25 Great Things I Learned from Podcast Guests in 2015

173 Comments

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The Tim Ferriss Show has been selected as one of iTunes’ “Best of 2015.” Thanks for all the incredible feedback this year! It’s what makes the show fun for me.

To celebrate, this short episode (approximately 30 minutes) describes 25 of my favorite learnings from 2015: tips, gadgets, and quotes from podcast guests that I’ve incorporated into my own life.  Enjoy!

 

And thanks so much for listening. I’ll try and make 2016 my best year of content yet🙂

Happy holidays to you and yours,

Tim

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Want to hear a podcast about my rituals? — Listen to the episode where I share how to win each day. In it, I discuss my morning routine and habits that set me up for success. (Stream below or right click here to download):


This podcast is brought to you by Mizzen + Main. These are the only “dress” shirts I now travel with — fancy enough for important dinners but made from athletic, sweat-wicking material. They are a personal favorite of NFL phenom J.J. Watt, alongside many professional athletes. Mizzen now also make chinos, which stretch in four directions, and are perfect for all climates. For all of their clothing: no more ironing, no more steaming, no more hassle. Click here for the exact shirts I wear most often. Just go to fourhourworkweek.com/shirts and find what you like.

This podcast is also brought to you by Wealthfront. Wealthfront is a massively disruptive (in a good way) set-it-and-forget-it investing service, led by technologists from places like Apple and world-famous investors. It has exploded in popularity in the last 2 years and now has more than $2.5B under management. In fact, some of my good investor friends in Silicon Valley have millions of their own money in Wealthfront. Why? Because you can get services previously limited to the ultra-wealthy and only pay pennies on the dollar for them, and it’s all through smarter software instead of retail locations and bloated sales teams.

Check out wealthfront.com/tim, take their risk assessment quiz, which only takes 2-5 minutes, and they’ll show you—for free–exactly the portfolio they’d put you in. If you want to just take their advice and do it yourself, you can. Or, as I would, you can set it and forget it.  Well worth a few minutes: wealthfront.com/tim.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: Who was your favorite guest in 2015, and what was your favorite tip or lesson? Please let me know in the comments.

Enjoy!

Posted on: December 19, 2015.

Watch The Tim Ferriss Experiment, the new #1-rated TV show with "the world's best human guinea pig" (Newsweek), Tim Ferriss. It's Mythbusters meets Jackass. Shot and edited by the Emmy-award winning team behind Anthony Bourdain's No Reservations and Parts Unknown. Here's the trailer.

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173 comments on “25 Great Things I Learned from Podcast Guests in 2015

  1. I really liked Derek Sivers’ story about his bike ride and going much slower, the penguin/pelican shitting in his mouth, etc, etc. Lesson learned: stop freaking out about rushing things like exercise, travel, etc because it’s really worth taking the extra couple minutes to enjoy the moments.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Sivers was the best! Loved his story. i hope you have him back on again soon, but only if it’s a “Fuck-yeah!” for you; otherwise don’t. 🙂

    Like

  3. Earlier in the year on your Facebook you posted a pic of a monkey painting and in the background of that pic to the left of the monkey in another room there appears to be a painting of a nude, dark haired woman who is bound.

    What is the story of that nude woman painting?.:)

    Like

  4. So many great podcast guests. I find it difficult to nominate one guest or one tip as my favourites. Favourite guest is Rick Rubin. I liked every guest I listened to. Many of the guests influenced me to get into their work or get into books or other things they recommended. My favourite tip is one every guest and Tim himself gives out in all books and podcasts: find out what is important and do it!

    Like

  5. Was looking forward to a summary episode and glad to see Tim put one together. Tim mentioned that he is going to pull together a synopsis of his podcast episodes and I wanted to make a suggestion. Rich Roll did an end of the year podcast in 2014 and it was fantastic. Maybe this is a format Tim could use. Here is the link to that episode:

    http://www.richroll.com/podcast/the-best-of-2014-part-one-rrp-121/

    I was thinking through some of the great things I learned from Tim’s show this year and wanted to share them below:

    Tara Brach – the Victor Frankle quote she mentions “Between the stimulus and the response there is a space, and in that space lies our growth and our freedom”. This quote is so beautiful and wonderful. I practice Vipassana meditation and a lot of the focus is on cultivating that space which I take to mean increase our awareness of our emotions or sensations when we have a stimulus (positive or negative). This quote helped me crystalize that growth and freedom lie in that pause.

    Glenn Beck – This episode taught me to not judge a book by it’s cover and that you don’t really know a person until you know their story. I had a ton of preconceptions of who Glenn Beck was. His interview was heartfelt, honest, and candid. I really appreciated this episode because living in San Francisco and running in the circles I run in I don’t often get much exposure to people with differing points of view than my own. Glenn (in addition to Jocko and General Stan McChrystal) provided viewpoints that helped me understand where others who I might have thought I disagree with are coming from.

    Robert Rodriguez – how to use mishaps or things that happen unexpectedly to your advantage. Think he mentioned that while filming “From Dusk Til Dawn” they accidentally blew up a building too early (or something like that). Instead of trying to undo the mess they had made they decided to have the building look charred for the whole movie. Made me realize that you can use everything to your advantage – similar to a lot of the lessons I learned reading Ryan Holiday’s book “The obstacle is the way”

    BJ Novak – This was one of my favorite episodes of the year. Appreciated how prepared BJ was for the interview and the specific tips he gave throughout the interview. One of my favorite lessons learn was to do it for charity. If you don’t care about the money and are looking for an “in” give the proceeds of your event, project, whatever to charity. You’ll get more people (like Bob Saget for BJ) to say yes that way. I feel like Tim also refers to this when he speaks about the benefits of volunteer work he did early in his career to get in with startups and network with people in the valley. I am interested in filmmaking and I appreciated BJ saying that the one consistent is there is no consistent path to the industry. Also, BJ had fantastic analogies (“the kid who knows he’s cute is not cute”).

    Rainn Wilson – I loved this interview. Rainn seems like a beautiful human being. The lesson I learned from him was that negativity is easy. What I took this to mean is that it’s easy to give a ton of reasons why something won’t work, or you shouldn’t quit your job or whatever. While those reasons are important, and should be considered, I should not let them paralyze me into inaction. For me to continue to make progress in my life I should try to avoid taking the easy way out. Instead, I should try a little harder to find solutions, solve problems, and not just bitch and moan. Also, his delivery of “Fuck You” for people (me included) who did not watch his show that got cancelled was hilarious. So well timed and delivered. I must have listened to that “Fuck You” 5 times…so good.

    Jocko – Sometimes it takes extreme darkness to see light. This is such a deep statement and what I feel like explains our experience as humans. We need the cold to feel warmth, we need sadness to experience happiness, etc. I had heard this before but it really registered for me coming from someone like Jocko who has seen so much darkness. Jocko also taught me the importance of using visualization for motivation. Jocko spoke in such detail about the image in his mind of the Taliban fighter rocking back and forth in a cave somewhere and that Jocko knew they were going to meet someday and that’s what motivated him to train hard, get up early, etc. Really crystallized for me what it means to visualize something and get energy from that to move me closer to my goals.

    Chris Sacca – learned the importance of going on the offensive. Chris spoke about how they moved to Truckee because in San Francisco they felt like they were always playing defense (taking meetings he didn’t really want to take, staying out late because they had to go to a dinner out of politeness, etc). When they moved to Truckee they were able to go on the offensive because they were too far from SF to attend things they weren’t really into and they could invite people who they were interested in connecting with better to their mountain home.

    Just wanted to say that I am so grateful for this podcast. Really appreciate the exposure I get to world class performers and we are so lucky to live in a time when this knowledge is so accessible. Thank you Tim.

    Some suggestions for Podcast guests:
    Elvis Mitchell – Incredible interviewer and has remarkable film knowledge
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Mitchell
    Werner Herzog
    Quentin Tarantino
    Joe Rogan

    Also, wanted to suggest that Tim write a blog post on interview tips. He gave a couple of great tips from Neil Strauss and Alex Bloomberg in this episode but I know he has also spoken with people like Larry King and likely done a ton of great research on becoming a great interviewer.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I really loved this comment and appreciated your level of detail I’m going to check out every episode you mentioned. (BJ Nowak’s book of short stories is fantastic, also. Funny, original, utterly non-formulaic.)

      Like

  6. My favorite guest was Derek Sivers. What an amazing guy… I really love his attitude toward life! Favorite tip: his summaries of 200+ books!

    Like

  7. Some suggestions for Podcast guests:
    Elvis Mitchell – Incredible interviewer and has remarkable film knowledge
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvis_Mitchell
    Werner Herzog
    Quentin Tarantino
    Joe Rogan

    Also, wanted to suggest that Tim write a blog post on interview tips. He gave a couple of great tips from Neil Strauss and Alex Bloomberg in this episode but I know he has also spoken with people like Larry King and likely done a ton of great research on becoming a great interviewer.

    Like

  8. Was looking forward to a summary episode and glad to see Tim put one together. Tim mentioned that he is going to pull together a synopsis of his podcast episodes and I wanted to make a suggestion. Rich Roll did an end of the year podcast in 2014 called “The best of 2014”. It’s episode 121 and it was fantastic. Maybe this is a format Tim could use.

    I was thinking through some of the great things I learned from Tim’s show this year and wanted to share them below:

    Tara Brach – the Victor Frankle quote she mentions “Between the stimulus and the response there is a space, and in that space lies our growth and our freedom”. This quote is so beautiful and wonderful. I practice Vipassana meditation and a lot of the focus is on cultivating that space which I take to mean increase our awareness of our emotions or sensations when we have a stimulus (positive or negative). This quote helped me crystalize that growth and freedom lie in that pause.

    Glenn Beck – This episode taught me to not judge a book by it’s cover and that you don’t really know a person until you know their story. I had a ton of preconceptions of who Glenn Beck was. His interview was heartfelt, honest, and candid. I really appreciated this episode because living in San Francisco and running in the circles I run in I don’t often get much exposure to people with differing points of view than my own. Glenn (in addition to Jocko and General Stan McChrystal) provided viewpoints that helped me understand where others who I might have thought I disagree with are coming from.

    Robert Rodriguez – how to use mishaps or things that happen unexpectedly to your advantage. Think he mentioned that while filming “From Dusk Til Dawn” they accidentally blew up a building too early (or something like that). Instead of trying to undo the mess they had made they decided to have the building look charred for the whole movie. Made me realize that you can use everything to your advantage – similar to a lot of the lessons I learned reading Ryan Holiday’s book “The obstacle is the way”

    BJ Novak – This was one of my favorite episodes of the year. Appreciated how prepared BJ was for the interview and the specific tips he gave throughout the interview. One of my favorite lessons learn was to do it for charity. If you don’t care about the money and are looking for an “in” give the proceeds of your event, project, whatever to charity. You’ll get more people (like Bob Saget for BJ) to say yes that way. I feel like Tim also refers to this when he speaks about the benefits of volunteer work he did early in his career to get in with startups and network with people in the valley. I am interested in filmmaking and I appreciated BJ saying that the one consistent is there is no consistent path to the industry. Also, BJ had fantastic analogies (“the kid who knows he’s cute is not cute”).

    Rainn Wilson – I loved this interview. Rainn seems like a beautiful human being. The lesson I learned from him was that negativity is easy. What I took this to mean is that it’s easy to give a ton of reasons why something won’t work, or you shouldn’t quit your job or whatever. While those reasons are important, and should be considered, I should not let them paralyze me into inaction. For me to continue to make progress in my life I should try to avoid taking the easy way out. Instead, I should try a little harder to find solutions, solve problems, and not just bitch and moan. Also, his delivery of “Fuck You” for people (me included) who did not watch his show that got cancelled was hilarious. So well timed and delivered. I must have listened to that “Fuck You” 5 times…so good.

    Jocko – Sometimes it takes extreme darkness to see light. This is such a deep statement and what I feel like explains our experience as humans. We need the cold to feel warmth, we need sadness to experience happiness, etc. I had heard this before but it really registered for me coming from someone like Jocko who has seen so much darkness. Jocko also taught me the importance of using visualization for motivation. Jocko spoke in such detail about the image in his mind of the Taliban fighter rocking back and forth in a cave somewhere and that Jocko knew they were going to meet someday and that’s what motivated him to train hard, get up early, etc. Really crystallized for me what it means to visualize something and get energy from that to move me closer to my goals.

    Chris Sacca – learned the importance of going on the offensive. Chris spoke about how they moved to Truckee because in San Francisco they felt like they were always playing defense (taking meetings he didn’t really want to take, staying out late because they had to go to a dinner out of politeness, etc). When they moved to Truckee they were able to go on the offensive because they were too far from SF to attend things they weren’t really into and they could invite people who they were interested in connecting with better to their mountain home.

    Just wanted to say that I am so grateful for this podcast. Really appreciate the exposure I get to world class performers and we are so lucky to live in a time when this knowledge is so accessible. Thank you Tim.

    Some suggestions for Podcast guests:
    Elvis Mitchell – Incredible interviewer and has remarkable film knowledge. His podcast is called The Treatment
    Werner Herzog
    Quentin Tarantino
    Joe Rogan

    Also, wanted to suggest that Tim write a blog post on interview tips. He gave a couple of great tips from Neil Strauss and Alex Bloomberg in this episode but I know he has also spoken with people like Larry King and likely done a ton of great research on becoming a great interviewer.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. I listened to every single podcast you had this year — wow, prob the most consistent thing I did in 2015. 😜 The Jamie Fox podcast was my favorite hands down, blew it out of the water. Had seen Jamie out in Miami a few times out having fun (even on his bday one time!) but was amazed and inspired by his seemingly effortless talent. I tried to vote for his episode but it said I had to give the company hosting the vote control of my Twitter account so decided against it. But know it was my vote!!

    Like

  10. I would definitely have voted for the Jamie Foxx podcast. Unfortunately the voting site uses Facebook and Twitter logins only and I don’t use social media accounts for third party access.

    If you send out any further reminders about voting, perhaps you could include a synopsis of each podcast. I believe I enjoyed the Naval podcast too, but I had to look up the old “The Person I Call Most for Startup Advice” email to find the synopsis.

    Like

  11. My husband & I really enjoyed the Dr Domenic Agostino podcast. We learnt a great deal of interesting information in regards to the Keto Diet. We were so impressed with the information he shared that we both commenced Keto dieting in mid November & tracking well so far. Please invite Dr Agostino back for Part 2 as we need more tips & tricks for successful Keto dieting. (I also loved the Dr Peter ATTIA podcast – so funny. Made my cardio session almost enjoyable – if that’s possible???)
    Keep them coming Tim. (Oh yeah, we also like the 5-Bullet Friday)

    Liked by 1 person

  12. You got Jamie Foxx to relax and give you a relaxed, authentic interview. You shut up and let Jamie shine. Your fellow interviewers could learn from you. Keep up the good work.

    Like

  13. My favorite guest in 2015 was Pavel Tsatsouline. Probably on one levels as a personal bias because this was the first podcast of your’s that I listened to, but mostly because Pavel offers up very simplistic, good advice. However, my favorite lesson or advice came in the Robert Rodriguez interview, when he stressed creativity and being more creative. No matter what you do in life, if you approach it with a creative mind, you are sure to make improvements.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Naval, definitely still my favorite, well deserved nomination. Congratulations!

    I am guilty of neomania. New year’s resolution is to plan more repetition, digestion & reflection of amazingness like these podcasts.

    As unreligious as I am there is definitely something to be said for religion’s use of tradition and repetition insofar as teaching/training a large group of people.

    As my man T-Rob says “Repetition is the mother of skill”

    Happy Christmahanakwanzika Tim, don’t stop being awesome.

    Like

  15. For me, more to the point, each and every podcast has proven valuable and informative. As long as I get insight into what people are doing and who they are being I am satisfied and will continue to listen. Keep up the good work and creativity bring out the best in others.

    Like

  16. My favorite guest was Jocko Willink. As a Marine and an Iraq veteran that really resonated with me. The biggest lesson I got from that was his take on learning the skills for detachment. I loved his advice to put yourself in a high stress, high pressure, high risk situation that if you don’t separate yourself from it to get that big picture view, failure would be inevitable.

    I really enjoy the variety of guests you bring onto your show Tim. Offers a great deal of perspectives, which is invaluable for growth. In the context of your post about taking a long startup vacation, I am curious what are some of the new perspectives you are seeking in 2016? What areas are you looking to adapt into for next year?

    Keep up the awesome work Tim. Looking forward to more next year.

    Like

  17. Hard to choose from so many great episodes, some of my favorites are: Maria Popova, Rick Rubin, Phil Libin, Whitney Cummings, Matt Mullenweg, Laird Hamilton & Gaby Reece, I´m gonna stop it right here, the list could go on and on. Keep up the awesomeness in 2016, happy holidays Tim.

    Like

  18. I liked Maria Popova, Alain de Botton and Sam Harris. Not so much for any singular ‘tip’ but for their overall intellectual energy and vitality. If nothing more, the podcasts inspired me to check out Sam Harris’ film and book, Bookmark Maria Popova’s blog for regular reading and finally to find myself smiling while listening to Tim’s interview with Alain de Botton. It might not have been your niche as you mentioned Tim but you did a great job in getting such unlikely guests on the show. Kudos.

    Like

  19. You recommend 2 hours in float tanks, is that in complete darkness and with silence, or with changing lights and light background music? I can’t seem to find what you wrote in regards to that.

    I’ve only tried float pods once, but you have the option to leave the changing lights on or switch them off.

    Like

  20. Arnold Swarzenegger was my favorite interview of 2015. He had a very powerful quote that I have incorporated in my life. It was when he was telling a story about one of his early bodybuilding competitions. He said, “I felt I could win and that’s what I was there for. I wasn’t there to compete. I was there to win.” I have heard statements similar to that before, however hearing extract the completion factor and only except winning was key!

    Like

  21. 1) I got a ChiliPad and I love it!!! Thanks
    2) Jamie Foxx and Derek Sivers interviews were both incredible!!!!
    3) I freakin love your podcast and books, you are so authentic and you make people feel like you are talking directly to them.
    4) You’re Awesome

    Like

  22. Tim, thanks for bringig us all this stuff.
    A cheaper and simplet solution to the chillipad is to use two different duvets. So in summer, for example, I use a single Tog 3 and my wife a single Tog 6 duvet on our king size bed.

    Like

  23. Looking at this list, to me it seems that lesson 26 schools be to have more women on the show in the future – don’t you think? My favorite episode of this year was definitely the one with Alain de Botton, thank you for that!

    Like

    • It is interesting that you suggest that there should be more female guests, and then you pick as male guest as your most favorite one among all the guests. Just an observation from a female.

      Like

      • @Kiraz that seems to follow, that with few female guests to choose from, someone’s favorite would be more likely to be male. Just because Eva is a woman and is encouraging more diversity in the interviewee seat doesn’t mean that she can only appreciate female guests.

        Like

  24. Also, my favourite interview remains Kevin Kelly, it’s the only one I’ve listened to repeatedly. He just seems to seep wisdom and joy through the headphones. It’s very comforting.

    But runners up from this year would have to be Scott Adams and Rick Rubin. And the reading of Lazy: A Manifesto. Will you get Tim Kreider on?

    Like

  25. I started listening to the Tim Ferriss Show in 2015, and let me tell you it’s been one of the best things I have ever done. The lessons learned from the 100+ podcasts (almost gone through all of them!) are invaluable and I want you to know how much it has meant to me Tim.

    So since we’re making lists, here are my top3-takeaways-from-the-podcast:

    1. Books are awesome.
    Being a student and a gamer, I always saw books as work and computerstuff/games as fun. Through hearing inspired people talk about their own or favorite books, I now they are invaluable tools for stimulating and feeding my curiosity. My only regret is that I didn’t know this when I was a bored 8 year old!

    2. My body matters (and sitting sucks)
    One of the biggest eye-openers was to really start thinking about my body and the small things I do that makes it feel shitty. One of my favorite podcasts of 2015 was Pavel Tsatsouline, not because I care about lifting, but because it made me realize that I can think on my own regarding health. Furthermore, when I graduated and got a nice desk at my new job, the many talks about standing-vs-sitting inspired me to try it out, and I am very happy to say that I stand almost all day and that it makes me feel great!

    3. WTFIMAT (Would Tim Ferriss Interview Me About This)
    While it would be cool to go on the podcast, this takeaway is not really related to getting my brain picked by Tim. Instead, it is the condensation of my realization that all the people Tim interviews are passionate about what they do. So I ask “WTFIMAT?” in the face of a new opportunity as a way of looking forward. As a test of whether I am truly excited about what it will bring. And to be honest, it has been a bigger eye-opener than expected: I have always been very fortunate with getting jobs/grades thrown at me, but I also have a deep-rooted need to make an impact. And doing so requires passion.

    So thank you for a wonderful year Tim, you have truly improved my life forever and I am sure I am not alone. Not bad for a kid from Long Island🙂

    Like

  26. oh man. Just scrolled through all the episodes for reminders and to help me pick one and I cant!! I have listened to your podcast since day 1 (i do miss the drunken ones and Tim Tim Talk Talk) BUT if I had to choose from the more recent.
    Sammy Kamkar – the hacking stuff was just cool.
    Kevin Costner – putting in the hard work when “successful”
    Jimmy Chin – Loved Meru
    Iceman – pushing your body beyond limits (and cold showers – can’t quite push myself to do the bath yet)
    Brene Brown – such a valuable message for our society
    Who am I kidding. ALL OF THEM. Best podcast out there by a long shot. Thank you!

    Like

  27. I was listening to this yesterday after my Simple & Sinister workout, and was surprised there was no mention of Pavel!! The two podcasts with him were pivotal for me in changing how I train since I listened to it in May, and I’ve even gone back and listened to them both again. (I just ordered a 32kg bell yesterday too!!) But that episode is very unique as I think I listened to it at least twice that weekend to absorb every morsel out of it, and I can bring myself back to that weekend very distinctly, both with driving around Daytona Beach, the flights involved there & back and the drive home from the airport on Sunday. Interestingly enough, Charles Poliquin’s podcast has my memory of the day just as vividly engaged (I was taking a test that weekend, so my brain was extra on), but more for the nutritional advice, which I’ve been using in my daily life since (zinc & magnesium threonate have changed my life!!)

    Arnold & Tony Robbins were also very impactful (tho Tony was 2013 I recall). And all the information on going ketogenic have been very helpful (Scivation’s Xtend Raw tastes horrible, but recovery results are IMMEDIATE!).

    I definitely think you need to keep doing year in review episodes, but you have SOOOO MUCH amazing material that you should do one of these QUARTERLY. I say that b/c there are many of your podcasts that I’ve glanced over initially because the title or interviewee didn’t appeal to me. But once I hear a little about a few select nuggets, I often go immediately to that episode and invest the time in listening to it! Besides, weren’t you looking for a good topic for in-between-isodes?

    As an aside, Tim, I have to express my gratitude for your podcast. It explores the many of the topics that I am interested in without the ego that other podcasters have to interject. I had started listening to podcasts when I found Nerdist’s podcast, and while I still listen to them from time to time, I have fallen away from listening to them regularly in favor of diving into the worlds you uncover. While I’m waiting to hear you talk to a chiropractor who’s going to talk neurology & not doing more nutrition or muscle therapy, I look forward to hearing more on world class performers!!

    Keep up the good work!!

    Like

  28. Hi Tim, I’ve only just started to listen to your podcasts. So far I have liked what I’ve heard. Yo Betts’ story resonated with me. I love food and drink. Such a simple pleasure in life, so underestimated by most people around us.

    I liked your interview with Derek Sivers yesterday, but you and Derek did sound misogynistic at one point, which was probably fully unintentional. It sounded like you were saying that people of great influence in your lives were either very beautiful women or a fantastic mentor, eg (very beautiful) women cannot be mentors?

    Like

  29. Hi Tim,
    Thought this would be the best way to reach to you.

    I am reading your book, 4 hour work week- currently up to the part where you challenged students to reach 3 seemingly impossible figures for a prize.

    Thought I would give it a try and ask you- could I take on this challenge?

    John.

    Like

  30. Favorite guests in 2015- Tara Brach, Pavel, Scott Adams, Naval, Jamie Foxx, Derek Sivers, Maria Popova, Wim Hof, Rick Rubin, Laird, Brene Brown, and Jocko. Have listened to these podcasts 4-5x each. A lot of the take always include taking the time to meditate, read, create systems, discipline is freedom, relax more than strain, GTG, breathe motherfucker, take the time to play the right notes, hot sauna to ice bath, underwater workouts, ignore the haters, and get a good nights sleep.

    Thank you Tim for your hard work with interviewing these guests.

    Like

  31. Thank so very much for your podcasts, and I’m glad you love doing it so most likely you won’t stop for a long time. I discovered your podcasts this year, have heard them all now, and in thinking back, your podcasts have been one of the highlights of my year, information-junkie that I am, although I am a highly discriminating info-junkie. Can’t pick out what I like best, because I love everything about your podcasts. I always look forward to the “standard” questions you ask at the end, and I especially like the show-notes so that I can access the books & sites talked about in the podcasts. Can’t think of a thing that you could do to make them better, but I love the exercise of trying to think of what you could do to be more creative–I’ll consider and get back to you.

    Thanks again, and keep up the good work! (P.S. I’m a vipassana meditator. In my Very limited observation, most of the women I know do vipassana, most of the men I know do t.m. Wonder if that’s just my world, or if there is a broader implication here…)

    Like

  32. My favorite of your 2015 guests was Whitney Cummings. I thought that she was so full of insights into what it means to be human and how to keep the BS from taking over your life. Also, just the experience of listening to the two of you interact was great! She is super-smart, super-aware, and super-articulate and you obviously knew that and, on the one hand, were proceeding with caution so that you wouldn’t say things you would be called on, and on the other were working hard to give her every possible chance to be herself to the fullest. Your job is not an easy one! But you did it really well and served her and your listeners to the fullest. I hope you have her on again some time. Although she was my favorite of your guests, she was a star in a big constellation of standouts. Tara Brach was great, McChrystal was great, Hof was great, I could go on and on.
    Thanks for having found your way to this podcast and for the effort and courage that go into creating and sustaining it!
    Stephen

    Like

  33. Hi Tim, I just want to thank you for allowing us to tap into the brain and experience of all the great people you interview in your show. Also, for pointing me towards stoic philosophy which now I am starting to read and practice. As a gesture of gratitude I would like to make a donation to a charity of your choice. Just let me know which or mention it in the next show. Best holiday wished for you and yours!

    Like

      • No, please do keep spelling them out. One time you suggested some kind of special tea in a video. Not the Yogi one. I listened to that part 5 times but I still didn’t get the name of that tea. Not a big deal. I am mentioning it as an example. On that note, I appreciate your voice and your articulate way of explaining everything. The way one delivers the info is as important as the info itself. You absolutely nail it. Thank you.

        Like

  34. My favorite episode (and there were many) was with the Terminator, The Governator, Arnold Schwarzenegger. There was a statement that he made that connected with me on so many levels. He said, “I felt I could win and that’s what I was there for. I wasn’t there to compete. I was there to win.” That type of statement is loaded with confidence and the strategy is simple–win period.

    Looking for more great interviews in 2016!

    Like

  35. I listen to your podcast while Ed drives to work and I usually take notes on your podcast (books to read, films to watch, exercises to avoid, etc) – this episode was pure awesome. My notes look like a direct transcription. Thank you for your podcast. Cheers to an incredible 2016 Tim!

    Like

  36. I’m not sure about the advice of pull ups. Unlike the exercises in The 4-Hour Body, pull ups are an advanced exercise: require low fat-ratio, require mobility (flexibility) and strength, and being injury free.

    “We’re a combination of levers; that’s how we move,” Vanderburgh said. “Generally speaking, the longer the limb, the more of a disadvantage in being able to do a pull-up. I look at a volleyball player and wouldn’t expect her to be able to do a pull-up, but I know she’s fit.”
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/25/why-women-cant-do-pull-ups/?_r=0

    Like

  37. Hey Tim-

    I am a huge fan of your books and podcast. Thank you for the consistent high quality content.

    I was wondering if you have any insight (articles, books, talks, or previous podcasts etc.) that cover fear of making a mistake or failure. The incessant need of checking & rechecking things whether it be checking if the oven was turned off to actual work in the office. This is closely related to OCD behavior, but maybe not as extreme. I am a very detail oriented person, but it can be a detriment.

    Any insight or direction would be great.

    Thanks again.

    Like

  38. I think Jamie Foxx was probably my guest on the Tim Ferris show – except maybe Matt Mullenweg – and that was hugely surprising for me as I never had a lot of exposure to Jamie Foxx before the episode.

    I’m also excited about you interviewing a “mainstream” celebrity, it helps me share your work with coworkers and friends who wouldn’t be interested in the more obscure (but equally interesting) guests you interview.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Couldn’t agree more with you Jacob. I am a big fan of all Tim’s podcasts, but they are always easy to share with those who are looking for something outside entrepreneurship and self-improvement.

      Jamie Foxx is someone a lot of people know and that makes it easier for people to relate to that particular podcast. Aside from that, Jamie’s podcast contained so much information and was helpful in so many ways.

      Tim thanks for doing what you are doing and keep it up in 2016!

      Like

  39. My favorites were Rick Rubin, Wim Hof, Laird & Gabby Alain de Botton and Derek Sivers and i actually listened to every Podcast you made this year. Will keep shouting it from the hilltops, always feel I get sooo much goodness into me, when listening. You are adding so much value to my life and the lives of others and it really is inspiring. Keep on rocking it!!

    Like

  40. Hey Tim, I’m from Zambia and I’d just like to appreciate the work you put out. Reading the 4HWW and your blog plus the podcast has helped make this my best year yet. Never stop being a teacher.
    Cheers.

    Like

  41. My favorites are Sam Harris, Derek Sivers, Rick Rubin and Alain de Botton, but I must add I didn’t listen to all of the podcasts. I like well-spoken, articulate, intellectual people who say a lot of things in one sentence.

    And you are the master of asking the right questions, Tim. You maneuver the conversations in the right way. Your funny jokes rescue the conversations from getting stiff.

    On another note, I grew up eating sardines but I do have special obsession with sardines. People ask me where I go for skin treatment. I tell them that it is about what I eat: sardines, calamari, shrimp, salad with olive oil and lemon, almonds and peanuts. In the USA, I have to get the sardines in cans unfortunately. It is best with arugula salad (arugula, tomato and lemon).

    I read 4HB. I know you don’t recommend eating fruit and nuts to lose weight, but if you are able to maintain your weight, you should have a handful of peanuts everyday or every other day. Not peanut butter. It is not the same thing. They made a research in China. The women who ate peanuts everyday for 10 years lived longer than those who never ate peanuts. I know it is a lot to do with our genes too, but if doing something improves your chances, why not do it?

    Btw, I bought Bose wireless headphone after you mentioned it in a periscope video. Bose is top notch. Now I can enjoy the podcast while I’m cooking and cleaning. Hope you have a great time in Christmas and New Years Eve wherever you are. xx

    Like

  42. Just found you and your work, first off Congratulations! I’m an instant fan of your style of creating such positive content for the masses. Favorite so far -> Jocko Willink. All our respect is due to the true heroes living and passed on. Our grandparents and some of us it’s Mom and Dad, who bravely take off “the rose colored glass” and “stare down the darkest parts of humanity,” so we as Americans (and hopefully the world) can remain FREE. Inspiring and humbling to do more with my every second. Thanks

    Like

  43. I was thinking through some of the great things I learned from Tim’s show this year and wanted to share them below:

    Tara Brach – the Victor Frankle quote she mentions “Between the stimulus and the response there is a space, and in that space lies our growth and our freedom”. This quote is so beautiful and wonderful. I practice Vipassana meditation and a lot of the focus is on cultivating that space which I take to mean increase our awareness of our emotions or sensations when we have a stimulus (positive or negative). This quote helped me crystalize that growth and freedom lie in that pause.

    Glenn Beck – This episode taught me to not judge a book by it’s cover and that you don’t really know a person until you know their story. I had a ton of preconceptions of who Glenn Beck was. His interview was heartfelt, honest, and candid. I really appreciated this episode because living in San Francisco and running in the circles I run in I don’t often get much exposure to people with differing points of view than my own. Glenn (in addition to Jocko and General Stan McChrystal) provided viewpoints that helped me understand where others who I might have thought I disagree with are coming from.

    Robert Rodriguez – how to use mishaps or things that happen unexpectedly to your advantage. Think he mentioned that while filming “From Dusk Til Dawn” they accidentally blew up a building too early (or something like that). Instead of trying to undo the mess they had made they decided to have the building look charred for the whole movie. Made me realize that you can use everything to your advantage – similar to a lot of the lessons I learned reading Ryan Holiday’s book “The obstacle is the way”

    BJ Novak – This was one of my favorite episodes of the year. Appreciated how prepared BJ was for the interview and the specific tips he gave throughout the interview. One of my favorite lessons learn was to do it for charity. If you don’t care about the money and are looking for an “in” give the proceeds of your event, project, whatever to charity. You’ll get more people (like Bob Saget for BJ) to say yes that way. I feel like Tim also refers to this when he speaks about the benefits of volunteer work he did early in his career to get in with startups and network with people in the valley. I am interested in filmmaking and I appreciated BJ saying that the one consistent is there is no consistent path to the industry. Also, BJ had fantastic analogies (“the kid who knows he’s cute is not cute”).

    Rainn Wilson – I loved this interview. Rainn seems like a beautiful human being. The lesson I learned from him was that negativity is easy. What I took this to mean is that it’s easy to give a ton of reasons why something won’t work, or you shouldn’t quit your job or whatever. While those reasons are important, and should be considered, I should not let them paralyze me into inaction. For me to continue to make progress in my life I should try to avoid taking the easy way out. Instead, I should try a little harder to find solutions, solve problems, and not just bitch and moan. Also, his delivery of “Fuck You” for people (me included) who did not watch his show that got cancelled was hilarious. So well timed and delivered. I must have listened to that “Fuck You” 5 times…so good.

    Jocko – Sometimes it takes extreme darkness to see light. This is such a deep statement and what I feel like explains our experience as humans. We need the cold to feel warmth, we need sadness to experience happiness, etc. I had heard this before but it really registered for me coming from someone like Jocko who has seen so much darkness. Jocko also taught me the importance of using visualization for motivation. Jocko spoke in such detail about the image in his mind of the Taliban fighter rocking back and forth in a cave somewhere and that Jocko knew they were going to meet someday and that’s what motivated him to train hard, get up early, etc. Really crystallized for me what it means to visualize something and get energy from that to move me closer to my goals.

    Chris Sacca – learned the importance of going on the offensive. Chris spoke about how they moved to Truckee because in San Francisco they felt like they were always playing defense (taking meetings he didn’t really want to take, staying out late because they had to go to a dinner out of politeness, etc). When they moved to Truckee they were able to go on the offensive because they were too far from SF to attend things they weren’t really into and they could invite people who they were interested in connecting with better to their mountain home.

    Just wanted to say that I am so grateful for this podcast. Really appreciate the exposure I get to world class performers and we are so lucky to live in a time when this knowledge is so accessible. Thank you Tim.

    Some suggestions for Podcast guests:
    Elvis Mitchell – Incredible interviewer and has remarkable film knowledge
    Werner Herzog
    Quentin Tarantino
    Joe Rogan

    Also, wanted to suggest that Tim write a blog post on interview tips. He gave a couple of great tips from Neil Strauss and Alex Bloomberg in this episode but I know he has also spoken with people like Larry King and likely done a ton of great research on becoming a great interviewer.

    Like

  44. Hey Tim,

    First and foremost: thanks for your podcast and the amazing knowledge and resources you’re putting out there. It is much appreciated.

    Only one question: we hear a lot in your podcasts and books about foods and concretely animal proteins and how they can help us humans perform. However, there has been no mention by any of your guests or you, not in your books, about Cowspiracy.com or documentaries/texts that raise the hand to advert the tremendous amount of energy and water resources that is needed to feed the animals we feed to afterwards eat. Have you ever considered opening a discussion about this? Or is it something you would prefer not to talk about?

    Thanks!!

    Like

  45. Hi Tim,

    I’d just like to say thanks to you for putting together these spectacular podcasts/resources. I’ve very much enjoyed listening to them this year. I look forward to seeing what value you’ll bring us all in 2016!

    Cheers,
    Josh

    Like

  46. Love the year-end wrap-up, and that’s a really tough choice between two fantastic conversations and guests (I’m keeping my choice a secret). Though it wasn’t mentioned in this year-end review, something worthy of honorable mention (although it wasn’t actually a podcast) is Tim’s May 6th post “Some Practical Thoughts on Suicide”, including the audio commentary by Tony Robbins:

    http://fourhourworkweek.com/2015/05/06/how-to-commit-suicide/

    Having helped someone dear to me work through this issue in the past year, I can testify to the valuable perspective and talking points that both Tim and Tony shared; and this is truly one of the most usable contributions that both of these guys have given to the world around them, as nearly every one of us will at some point cross paths with this issue.

    Tim, thanks so much for a wonderful year of actionable information and fascinating conversations; keep up your wonderful art!

    PS – a few recommendations for podcast interviews in 2016:

    1. University of Texas Chancellor and former Navy Seal – Admiral William McRaven
    2. Sequoia Capital partner and successful startup CEO – Aaref Hilaly
    3. Willie Nelson – legendary musician and music establishment rebel
    4. Either of the conservative radio talk show hosts – Mark Levin or Rush Limbaugh (this could get interesting🙂.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. First, have loved the podcast this year. Thank you for all of your hard work. My Q: Is there a show notes / links for this episode? I’d like to check out the travel fitness equipment you had mentioned as well as several of the other items. If this is a “best of,” it would be great to consolidate these links rather than need to hop to many different podcasts to find all of the links. Thanks Tim and team

    Liked by 1 person

  48. The best podcast of the year are: by far No.1 is with Noah Kagan. So many gems inside that I have listen it 5-6 times to catch everything. Second one I wold highlight is one with Arnold Schwarzenegger. Lot of good things about mentality of a Winner with capital W.
    Keep up with good work Tim, and have the best year yet in 2016😉

    Like

  49. Tim,

    To the Matt Mullenweg suggestion…check out Spiritualize by Lotus. This song has been my go to put on repeat for about 8 years now.

    You rock!

    -Ryan

    Like

  50. 1st post!
    Naval was so good. I don’t know where to begin, but I felt like while he operates at such a high level, he was able to explain and breakdown his processes and motivations for individual success. No BS, no dogma, just honest truths as he knows them.

    Naval, Noah Kagan, and now Derek Sivers are constantly on repeat in my playlist.

    Like

  51. Many thanks for the year-end wrap-up, and for sharing the idea of revisiting previously consumed great content! It was just about a year ago that I started listening to the podcast (with the Rick Rubin interview, I believe), so this was an especially enjoyable walk down memory lane for me.

    Though this wasn’t an actual podcast, I think something that deserves honorable mention in this episode is the May 6th post on “Some Practical Thoughts on Suicide”, including the audio portion with Tony Robbins. Having helped someone very dear to me work their way through this issue in the past year, I think this is one of Tim and Tony’s most significant contributions to-date. Nearly all of us will cross paths with this issue in some fashion, and the perspectives and thought-processes that both guys shared are tremendously helpful.

    Tim, thanks so much for a wonderful year of entertaining conversations and actionable information; you are on fire, and keep up the great art! 🙂

    Like

  52. Derek Sivers was absolutley amazing because his information lined up when i needed it most. Outside of that, I really connected with Naval during the podcast. Those two will be my newest additions to my mentor group for the coming year

    Like

  53. Scott Adams of Dilbert! His discussion about Hypnosis made me realize how it is used everywhere and the best utilizers of this skill have people captivated. This skill can be used for good, though. As a culinary instructor and just as a teacher in general, if you can engage your audience using these techniques that Tony Robbins does so well, then you can teach so much more effectively.

    Also, Scott’s theory about Donald Trump has been a great conversation starter at parties!

    Like

  54. Tim – great summary of the highly interesting mix of guests, topics and insights in 2015.

    One of my favorite episodes was the one with Tara Brach. Tara has such a natural way of teaching. The urge to teach broke out of her a few times during the conversation. Having been a keen listener to her dharma talks and guided meditations, I did enjoy the personal background. You Tim, too have such a way with words and personal situations.

    My biggest piece of advice I took away for myself was based on a realization we both seemed to have had at about the same time. While reading and working with books is nice and well, reflection and action must follow. The curious mind is all too eager to jump to the next interesting topic and the effect or learnings of the things read in the first book fade away.

    So reading, reflecting and applying is the ticket. I will bring down my non-fiction read to about 6 books and focus more on being and doing.

    Any updates on The Tim Ferriss Exerpriment rights outside of the U.S. i.e. in Europe/Germany?

    Like

  55. My 5 favorite eps of the year in no particular order were: Robert Rodriguez, Jamie Foxx, Derek Sivers, Jocko Willink, and Tony Robbins.

    My favorite piece of advice was from Robert Rodriguez, paraphrased here: There’s NEVER any reason to be upset about anything. Everything has a purpose. Turn it around: let’s make something out of it. How can we find good in it.

    Like

  56. Thank you for what you do, and do so well. You add a ton of value to my life and as a result those I share your ideas and thoughts with. Thank you and Happy Holidays.
    -Bryan

    Like

  57. Tie for first place between KEVIN COSTNER and Derek Sivers!

    Kevin Cosner: very interesting hearing about Kevin’s life-shaping experiences (e.g., near-death experience on his way to tryouts for a play, or even the “chalk-board” experience as a youngster). I also loved hearing about the life lessons he learned from his father, such as hard work, etc., and how Kevin lives with a hybrid ‘work smart and hard’ format.

    Derek Sivers: this guy is very fascinating. I loved how you let him tangent off into any direction his mind would lead, and then coming back to the main artery of the convo. I would of loved to hear about how he learned about how he got interested in programming, as shown on his GitHub site.

    Lastly, Jamie Foxx’s interview was also up there as well… top three podcasts I would say. I liked how you had Jamie expand upon his many diff talents and even talk in depth about his grandmother and life lessons she taught him.. even further, how he USED those life lessons from g-ma to progress in life.

    You’re an excellent listener and interviewer, I like how you hear an interesting tangent and run with it.

    P.S. Matt Mullenweg and everything Kevin Rose (random podcast) is super chill

    Like

  58. Tie for first place between KEVIN COSTNER and Derek Sivers!

    Kevin Cosner: very interesting hearing about Kevin’s life-shaping experiences (e.g., near-death experience on his way to tryouts for a play, or even the “chalk-board” experience as a youngster). I also loved hearing about the life lessons he learned from his father, such as hard work, etc., and how Kevin lives with a hybrid ‘work smart and hard’ format.

    Derek Sivers: this guy is very fascinating. I loved how you let him tangent off into any direction his mind would lead, and then coming back to the main artery of the convo. I would of loved to hear about how he learned about how he got interested in programming, as shown on his GitHub site.

    Lastly, Jamie Foxx’s interview was also up there as well… top three podcasts I would say. I liked how you had Jamie expand upon his many diff talents and even talk in depth about his grandmother and life lessons she taught him.. even further, how he USED those life lessons from g-ma to progress in life.

    You’re an excellent listener and interviewer, I like how you hear an interesting tangent and run with it.

    P.S. Matt Mullenweg and everything Kevin Rose was super chill

    Like

  59. Pavel Tsatsouline — listed to it again and again, referred it to at least a dozen different people. Shit, I listened to the opening sound byte a dozen times and laughed every time. “Sound check: Breakfast. Coffee.” Freaking priceless!!! But I’ve used a lot of what you and Pavel discussed there, i.e. grease the groove, max of 5 reps for strength gains, hold the plank like you’re about to be kicked. All of it is brilliant, wickedly effective, and pure joy to listen to two such eloquent, sophisticated people discussing it. You’re awesome, Tim!

    Like

  60. Hey Tim,

    Huge fan. I listen to your podcasts at the gym, so the show notes are always something that I make sure to look at after listening. Will there be notes and links from this episode?

    Like

  61. Hi Tim,

    I just want to say, keep up the good work mate! I read 4HWW multiple times during 2015 and I have to thank you, that book became my bible and I’ve recently launched my product, a website that sells 9 week healthy habit formation programs with the assistance of an exercise, nutrition and motivation expert. As I write this, I’m creating content for the site after a sizeable lifestyle re-design. I’m sat next to a pool with a beautiful coastline view of Kep in Cambodia while simultaneously ‘working’.

    I think everyone on here would agree with me when I say; this man has created more time that Father Time himself (for those willing to apply his advice)!

    All the best for 2016!

    Like

  62. Hi Tim,

    I heard in this last episode and from a twitter request that you are looking for someone to create concise notes for your podcasts and I’d like to throw my hat into the ring. This is exactly what I’ve already been doing for some of your and other podcasts for about the past 6 months. My goal is to pull out all the key ideas/recommendations/etc. into a readable format that is more useful than transcription and more meaty than a simple list of links. Believe it or not, this is my attempt at a 4-hour workweek type lifestyle business. I’m still at the early stages, but it is my goal to keep growing things slowly over time.

    Rhonda Patrick seems to like them so far and has tweeted out links a number of times, so please reach out to her if you’d like a trusted perspective.

    I’d be happy to discuss changes/improvements in format/content/etc. to match your vision. In general, when writing up my notes, I’ve done my best to link directly to the original podcast and note any sponsors/sponsored links in the show to drive traffic back to you/others.

    I’ll avoid a direct link as requested in your rules above, but you can consider podcastnotes dot org as my resume (also find me via @podcastnotes). I suggest checking out the posts for your show, but also some from Joe Rogan, Rhonda Patrick and others as well.

    It would be an incredible opportunity to work with you!

    Thanks!
    Yoni

    PS: This seemed to be the best way to reach out to you from what I can tell, but I’ll try send over a few tweets as well to try grab your attention.

    I’m also a big fan, read all the books, watched your show, etc.

    Like

      • Hi Tim,

        Thank you so much for taking the time to take a look!

        I’m ashamed with the last rush post. No excuses, but the content has been fixed. I’ve also added some other minor improvements and additional useful links throughout. In the future I would be happy to ensure quality by having all posts are edited by a proof-reader. http://podcastnotes DOT org/?p=267

        Acknowledging that I might already have lost my shot. I would make the case that I bring a uniquely broad perspective and can integrate concepts from your full body of work, scientific/clinical research, economics, business, psychology and other fields (happy to provide specific credentials if you are interested).

        I hope to hear back, but regardless keep on doing what you do!

        -Yoni

        Like

  63. It’s impossible to choose only one guest. This is my top-7 for 2015, in alphabetical order:

    Scott Adams
    Jamie Foxx
    Sam Harris
    Kevin Kelly
    Phil Libin
    Matt Mullenweg
    Rick Rubin

    PS: you want freedom with books? Self-publish: you have money, contacts, and most of all skills. You don’t need publishers. Publishers need you: who cares? Just write.

    Like

  64. Great summary episode!

    BEST upcoming podcast recommendation: Greg McKeon- author of “Essentialism”

    Greg took the Pareto principle and put it on steroids!

    His mantra of “less but better” combined with the most practical tips that I ever learned, make him a top candidate.

    The ultimate challenge, however, is: can you convince an expert who built a career in teaching leaders the fine art of saying “No” 😃?

    Tim – I would love to see you accept the challenge!

    Like

  65. Tim, I was introduced to your podcast earlier this year, and believe me when I say it has been one of the constant positives of my life ever since. Your interview style is novel and refreshing, and I really appreciate the way you “get deep” (as Jocko described it) with so many different types of remarkable people.

    Favorite interview: Laird Hamilton (when I think of the word “successful,” he and Gabby come to mind.)

    Favorite quote: “Breathe, motherfucker!”

    Misc.: I watched “Meru” recently while on a flight to Colorado. WOW.

    On another note, can I buy some NZT from you? Jk… (but seriously, I have a sneaking suspicion that you’ve discovered the formula).

    Like

  66. Thank you for so many great podcast. I have found great nuggets in all of them. Also, thanks for the slow carb, I lost 40 pounds from May til August and have kept it off. Thanks to Pavel I started hand grips and simple and sinister. I even went to a strong first kettleball course. I have just completed the wim hof method and take cold showers for 10 minutes daily here in the upper midwest as well as the breathing techniques. More than anything else I now have a morning routine that sets my day. As a physician I really enjoyed Dom D’Agostino’s podcast, so many nuggets. I would like to see you do for a ketogenic diet what you did for slow carb. Tara Brach and Sam Harris have gotten me to mediate and I feel calmer. I recommend the slow carb diet to all my patients that want to lose weight. Thanks again for such a podcast. I would like to see you interview Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

    Cheers, and Happy Holidays.

    Like

  67. Hey Tim, your podcast is the one I consistently listened to the most throughout the entire year. At the beginning of your “Best of 2015” podcast you said something that have stuck with me: “constant ingestion of information is procrastination” (I’m paraphrasing). I will definitively spend more time “digesting” what I read or listen to instead of trying to keep up with the latest book/article/podcast/blog post. My favorite guests in order were: Naval Ravikant, Jane McGonigal, Charles Poliquin, Tara Brach and Doctors Martin Polanco and Dan Engle. My metric to pick them was simple: if I found myself constantly talking about what those guests shared to family and friends for many weeks, I figured they have made and impact on me.

    Like

  68. Sorry, Tim. I’m unsubscribing from the blog and the website. Wanted to let you know why since I’m right in the target audience (male, mid-30s). Short answer: it’s just too much self-promotion and ads. You’ve worn out your welcome.

    By way of background, I bought 4HWW, 4HBody and 4HChef (and have given them as gifts), and initially liked the blog and podcasts.

    But it’s just too much self-promotion for me now.

    I don’t get 2 emails a week for each blog post from Nerdist and other podcasts I like, or emails from Chris Hardwick about what he’s listening to on the radio, what quote he thought was clever, what article he read this week, etc. Too much of a “cult of personality.”

    I also don’t like the shameless begging for likes/upvotes and, even worse, the audience manipulation tactics of “hey, whoever promotes my [thing] the most can win a dinner with yours truly!”

    Lastly, your podcast is the only podcast where I can safely fast-forward 5-6 minutes into it and miss nothing but pre-recorded ads.

    I may come back at some point, but for now, I need a break.

    Like

      • Thanks. Just wanted to say that the reason I left the comment in the first place was not to be a “hater” or a “troll,” but because I like you and the 4HWW (in particular) was a game changer book for me. I’ve re-read The Low Information Diet chapter probably 10 times. And although I need a break for a while, I wish you success.

        Like

  69. Hi Tim,

    I always find your “in-between” podcasts to be really insightful. I love the concentration of useful tips and ideas.

    I also love that you in your normal podcast show notes you post links to things you reference in the show notes.

    I would find a ton of value in having similar show notes with links to all of the great tips you suggest for your “in-between” episodes too.
    Or if you’re up for it, having the whole 25 things you learned bullet pointed in the show notes.

    I’m usually not in a position to take notes while I’m listening to podcasts.

    Thanks!
    Chema

    Like

  70. I was only somewhat familiar with Tony Robbins from his interview with Lewis Howes before I heard your coversation with him. I’m surprised this was not in more of the comments below but I found his personal and financial advice extremely powerful .
    The simple function of incorporating “priming” type thoughts into my morning meditation has helped me make some big leaps this year.
    And although his new book is very long the information for most people is hugely impactful and sad that most will never take two steps to secure there future by taking some easy investing ideas and applying them.

    Monthly round table with Mark Hart in Fort Worth.
    I have the privilege of being apart of a small group of tinkers that take part in a monthly round table hosted by Mark Hart. I was surprised last week when he mentioned the work he had done with you and Time he has spent with Josh.
    I was wondering if you had a question that we could pose to the group that might spark a great conversation?

    Thanks for all the great content in 2015 and looking forward to what’s to come in 2016

    Like

  71. Thank you Tim, I’ve truly enjoyed your podcasts and the nuggets of gold you and your guests have been dropping. Have yourself a wonderful Christmas and look forward to more excellent work from you in 2016. Pura Vida my friend. Ciao. AV .. p.s Sivers and Ravikant my fave so far😉

    Like

  72. Tim-
    Thanks for the podcasts in general. We have been having quite a rough patch lately – big job change for my wife looming and looming would have us moving away from Oakland after 16 years. (though to Hawaii) Daughter is homeless locally and doesn’t want help so the holidays are particularly shitty. Honestly your podcast helps us find ways we can just deal. I regularly quote and discuss things with my wife on how to handle life in general from tidbits from your guests. I have my own podcast and have stolen your format for my niche only because I am so addicted, and enjoy your podcasts. It is a sort of homage to you. I can’t put a finger on which is my favorite show. The Derek Sivers one was pretty epic. His quote if you don’t think something is “FUCK YEAH then don’t do it” will really change my 2016. I never write shit like this to anyone and I am not a fanboy but I thought you should know how much you have helped us. Tipping a glass of Casa Dragones to you right now. Merry Christmas.

    Like