Dr. Peter Attia on Life-Extension, Drinking Jet Fuel, Ultra-Endurance, Human Foie Gras, and More

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Tim Ferriss and Peter Attia

“How do you balance the desire to live longer with the desire to perform well?” (Tweet It)
– Peter Attia, MD

This episode delves into all types of performance enhancement and tracking — optimizing blood testing, drinking “jet fuel,” training for ultra-endurance sports, consuming synthetic ketones, using metabolic chambers, extending longevity by avoiding certain types of exercise, and much more.

Peter Attia is the co-founder and current president of the Nutritional Science Initiatives (NuSI).

He is an ultra-endurance athlete, compulsive self-experimenter, and one of the most fascinating human beings I know. Peter also earned his M.D. from Stanford University and holds a B.Sc. in mechanical engineering and applied mathematics from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. He resided at John Hopkins Hospital as a general surgeon, then conducted research at the National Cancer Institute under Dr. Steve Rosenberg, where Peter focused on the role of regulatory T cells in cancer regression and other immune-based therapies for cancer.

PLEASE:  Join Peter and I (I’m matching up to $50,000) in supporting this high-leverage project, ideally before the end of December.

This episode is brought to you by Onnit. Joe Rogan introduced me to Onnit, and since then, my garage has resembled a showroom. I own Onnit supplements (like chewable melatonin for jetlag and flights), maces, battle ropes (not “battle robes,” as I first heard it), kettlebells, and enough gear to ensure a lifetime of self-inflicted torture and higher performance.

This podcast is also brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY:  What counter-intuitive physical “hacks” or dietary approaches have been most impactful in your life? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Enjoy! Read More

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Human Foie Gras — A Golden Opportunity

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foie-creative-commons

To kick things off, what is foie gras?

It can be explained with a short missive from our friend Wikipedia:

The California foie gras law, California S.B. 1520, is a California State statute that prohibits the “force feed[ing of] a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird’s liver beyond normal size”…

Former Senator John Burton called foie gras production “an inhumane process that other countries have sensibly banned.”

Given this outrage related to mistreating birds, you might be surprised to learn that human foie gras industries are booming.  Children’s livers are apparently particularly tasty. Not unlike veal, I suppose.

I’m putting $50K of my own money into related investments, but we’ll get back to that in a minute. First, some background…

For most of the 20th century, fatty liver and liver cirrhosis had two primary causes: drinking too much alcohol (e.g. Mickey Mantle) or hepatitis B or C (via IV drug use, unhygienic tattooing, tainted blood transfusions, etc.).

But in the last few decades, even infants are showing up with livers that should belong to hardcore alcoholics.  And the numbers aren’t small.

It’s estimated that one in ten American children now suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alongside 40 million affected adults. If you’re an obese Mexican-American boy, the odds are 50-50 (!) that you have NAFLD, thanks to genetic predisposition (PNPLA3 gene).

15 years ago, this disease was unheard of.  In 10 years, it’s projected to be the #1 cause of liver transplants. Put another way — In 2001, NAFLD was the reason for 1 out of every 100 liver transplants; by 2010, it was up a ten-fold to 1 in 10; by 2025, assuming nothing stems this tide, there could be five million Americans who need new livers because of it.

Who are driving this trend?

Some point fingers at good folks such as Coca-Cola, juice “cocktail” manufacturers, and the like.  Given that many researchers blame fructose, it’s not a huge stretch. Personally, the whole thing makes me sick.  I’d like to sic the best scientists in the country on them.

Ah, and this is where the good news comes in.

There is a way, albeit an indirect way, to do this. I implore you to read on and bear with me.  This is where it gets exciting.

The NIH alone has spent $155 billion on cancer research since 1972, and cancer survival is up a paltry 3% as a result. The US government spends over $25 billion EACH year on HIV/AIDS. That’s a lot of money.

One might assume fatty liver disease would require similar sums. After all, more American adults have NAFLD than prostate cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, or type 2 diabetes.

NAFLD

That’s the disconnect…and the opportunity to be part of history.

Enter the “Manhattan Project of Nutrition”

The Nutrition Science InitiativeNuSI–has been called the “Manhattan Project of nutrition.” They are run like a lean startup, and I’m proud to be a part of their advisory board.

They don’t take industry money, so they have no interests to protect.

They believe the NAFLD epidemic can be curtailed for a total of $50 million, but the whole domino effect starts with just $1 million.  It is a rare day in science when fundamental questions about an epidemic can be answered with such little money (respectively). It’s an incredible Archimedes lever.

For context, NuSI argues that there are dietary triggers of diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and fatty liver disease. To determine what the triggers are, NuSI assembles teams of the best scientists in the country (e.g., from Stanford, Harvard, Columbia, NIH, UCSF, UCSD, Emory, etc.) to fund and execute the kind of research nobody else is willing (or able) to perform.

For NAFLD, NuSI’s team of experts have designed three trials to determine the respective roles of too many calories, too many carbohydrates, and too much sugar–the leading three hypotheses–as dietary triggers.

In early 2015, this team will begin the first ever controlled clinical trial to see if removing sugars from the diet can reverse fatty liver disease in children.

40 kids with NAFLD will be split into two groups, with 20 simply observed on their normal diet as controls, and 20 provided with a diet that’s identical to what they usually eat, but completely devoid of added or refined sugars. The scientists’ hypothesis is that the sugar-free diet will at least stop the progression of NAFLD in these kids, and may even reduce the amount of fat in their livers.

If that’s the case, it’ll be the best evidence we have linking sugar to fatty liver disease.

My $50,000 Challenge…And How to Get Involved

I’m personally matching up to $50,000 for whatever is raised through this blog post, and every donation–big or small–makes a major difference.

[UPDATE: An anonymous donor — a generous reader of this blog — has offered to match up to another $150,000. That means that if you all help donate or contribute just $200,000, another $200,000 will be matched for a total of $400,000!]

Any donation is also a tax write-off, as NuSI is a non-profit organization (of course, speak with your tax advisor). Perfect for end-of-the-year giving.

NuSI is looking to raise $1 million dollars for the first of these three trials—the one that determines how the rest get done.  The snowball that starts the avalanche. There are few chances in the world to have this type of impact for this type of money.  Could it end up forcing labeling changes, product modifications, obligatory package warnings, policy shifts, and more?  I believe so.

Supporting this campaign very easy, and remember–I’m excited to be putting my own skin in this game.  I sincerely hope you join me.  Every bit counts.

There are three options:

1. Donate by credit or debit card. Visit: http://nusi.org/donate. Enter your donation amount, indicate “NAFLD — Tim Ferriss” in the message field, and click “Donate.”  Done.

2. Donate by check. Send your check to: NuSI, attention: Lacey Stenson, 6020 Cornerstone Court W. Suite 240, San Diego, CA 92121. Be sure to write “NAFLD – Tim Ferriss” in the memo line.

3. Donate by transferring securities (stocks, etc.). Email TimFerriss1million@nusi.org [remember the double “r” and double “s”] and they’ll do as much heavy lifting as possible.

Thank you for reading, and thank you for supporting if you’re able.  This is a good fight.

If you’d also like to hear a fascinating chat with Peter Attia, MD, co-founder of NuSI, I interview him here on radical sports experimentation, synthetic ketones, meditation, and more. He’s a competitive ultra-endurance athlete, MD, surgeon, and obsessive self-tracker, so we get along great :)


###

Relevant reading and citations:

Browning JD et al. Prevalence of hepatic steatosis in an urban population in the United States: Impact of ethnicity. Hepatology, 2004.

Welsh JA, Karpen S, Vos MB. Increasing prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among United States adolescents, 1988-1994 to 2007-2010. Journal of Pediatrics, 2013.

Targher G, Day CP, Bonora E. Risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The New England Journal of Medicine, 2010.

Dudekula A et al. Weight loss in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients in an ambulatory care setting is largely unsuccessful but correlates with frequency of clinic visits. PLoS One, 2014.

Kawasaki T et al. Rats fed fructose-enriched diets have characteristics of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis. The Journal of Nutrition, 2009.

Sanchez-Lozada LG et al. Comparison of free fructose and glucose to sucrose in the ability to cause fatty liver. European Journal of Nutrition, 2010.

Best CH et al. Liver damage produced by feeding alcohol or sugar and its prevention by choline. British Medical Journal, 1949.

Ouyang X et al. Fructose consumption as a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Journal of Hepatology, 2008.

Abid A et al. Soft drink consumption is associated with fatty liver disease independent of metabolic syndrome. Journal of Hepatology, 2009.

Abdelmalek MF et al. Increased fructose consumption is associated with fibrosis severity in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hepatology, 2010.

Assy N et al. Soft drink consumption linked with fatty liver in the absence of traditional risk factors. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology, 2008.

Stanhope KL et al. Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans. The Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009.

Maersk M et al. Sucrose-sweetened beverages increase fat storage in liver, muscle, and visceral fat depot: a 6-mo randomized intervention study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2012.

Browning JD et al. Short-term weight loss and hepatic triglyceride reduction: Evidence of a metabolic advantage with dietary carbohydrate restriction. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2011.

Vos MB, Lavine JE. Dietary fructose in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hepatology, 2013.
Chung M et al. Fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or indexes of liver health: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2014.

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Marc Goodman, FBI Futurist, on High-Tech Crime and How to Protect Yourself

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The Tim Ferriss Show with Marc Goodman

“The fact of the matter is, back in 2008, terrorists were using search engines, like Google, to determine who shall live and who shall die. I know it’s a black swan event, but when you’re sharing on Facebook, it’s not just the media and marketing companies that you need to be concerned about. When you share openly, everybody has access to it.” (Tweet It)
– Marc Goodman

[Quick announcement: The Tim Ferriss Show is officially one of iTunes’ “Best of 2014“! Would you or your company like to sponsor the show? Click here for more details.]

Marc Goodman has been a Resident Futurist for the FBI and a senior adviser to Interpol.  He is also author of the much anticipated Future Crimes.

In this episode, we’ll go deep into the digital underground to expose the alarming ways criminals, corporations, and even countries are using emerging technologies against you…and some simple steps you can take to decrease your vulnerability.

To start, 3-D printers can produce AK-47s, bio-terrorists can download the recipe for Spanish flu, and cartels are using fleets of drones to ferry drugs across borders (all of which we touch on), but what else is waiting for you? What else is potentially targeting you right now?

If you want to hear about current and future threats, and simple defensive steps you can take, this interview is for you.

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

This episode is also brought to you by ExOfficio, which I’ve personally used since 2005 or so. They make ultra-lightweight, quick drying, antimicrobial clothing for men and women. Here’s my own ultra-light packing list (scroll down for video), which went viral.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: Have you ever been hacked or cyber-attacked? What practices are you using to mitigate the threat in the future? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Enjoy!

Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here. It keeps me going…

Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes

  • Rapid fire questions [7:45]
  • Marc Goodman’s daily rituals [11:55]
  • Surprising examples of Internet-based crime [13:25]
  • Personalized biological weapons, genetic sequencing, etc. [16:25]
  • 23andMe best practices: paranoia vs. preparedness [22:10]
  • Examining the urban myth (or not?) of personalized biological weapons [26:10]
  • Debunking the myth that terrorists and criminals are simply uneducated [28:10]
  • “Public safety is too important to leave to the professionals.” [35:55]
  • Do you think having iodine tablets and gas masks at home is overkill? [44:05]
  • Kidnapping in the modern world [45:40]
  • The story of Andy Grove and data infiltration in China [50:10]
  • Spear-phishing e-mails and how billions can be lost [52:50]
  • How to Armageddon-proof yourself [54:55]
  • The digital underground and how to access it [57:00]
  • The illicit drug industry and how disruptive technology is a threat to it [1:00:00]
  • On “Narco” R&D budgets, drones, submarines and shock and awe  [1:06:55]
  • Potential threats of artificial intelligence (AI) [1:12:25]
  • The scalable paradigm shift in modern crime [1:15:15]
  • A handful of simple steps to decrease the odds of successful attacks [1:18:55]
  • Low-hanging fruit in terms of security [1:25:25]
  • On cyber crime cottage industries [1:27:40]
  • Why there is a Post-It note on every camera of Marc Goodman’s devices [1:29:05]
  • How the Crowne Casino in Melbourne was hacked for $33 million [1:33:05]

People and Concepts Mentioned (Partial List)

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Bryan Callen on Eating Corgis (Yes, The Dogs) and Improving Creativity

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Tim Ferriss and Bryan Callen discuss craft, comedy and achievement

“There are three things you can’t fake: 1. Fighting, 2. Sex, and 3. Comedy.” (Tweet It)
- Bryan Callen

Alright, this may be the funniest episode yet.

Bryan Callen is a world-class comic and prolific actor. He travels the globe performing stand-up comedy for sold-out audiences, and — in his spare time — regularly appears on shows like Frasier, Entourage, Law & Order, CSI, Sex and the City, Oz, The King of Queens, and How I Met Your Mother.

Bryan is also INCREDIBLY well read.  Don’t miss the show notes and links below.

In this episode, we delve into the craft of comedy, fixing education (or shortcuts within it), habits and tricks for boosting creativity, writing, and the general pursuit of excellence.

And, of course, eating corgis…

Eat a Corgie - Bryan Callen on the Tim Ferriss Show

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

This episode is also brought to you by ExOfficio, which I’ve personally used since 2005 or so. They make ultra-lightweight, quick drying, antimicrobial clothing for men and women. Here’s my own ultra-light packing list (scroll down for video), which went viral.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: Who are your 2-3 favorite comedians? What style or traits make them memorable? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Enjoy!

And PLEASE — Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here. They’re very important and keep me going.

Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes

  • How Bryan Callen and Tim Ferriss started dating [9:45]
  • On fighting, sex, and comedy [10:50]
  • How to create a long-term career in comedy [11:45]
  • On public education [15:45]
  • Bryan Callen’s creative process [23:45]
  • Comics who inspire Bryan [34:05]
  • Bryan’s first great performance [36:50]
  • How Bryan Callen developed his appetite for reading [42:05]
  • Bryan Callen’s first paid gig [47:30]
  • Rapid fire questions: Pilsner, aged wine, politics, pit bulls, hunting, originality, and eating corgis [01:04:45]

People Mentioned

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The Random Show: Hating Tech, Hidden Japanese Gems, Sexual Awkwardness, and More

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This episode of The Random Show is a mind snack… fueled by wine. There are dozens of topics covered in this bromantic session of scatterbrained nonsense.

Like what? To start off: hidden gems in Japan, hating tech, Kevin’s new obsessions (and projects), gifts, books we’re reading, excessive sexual awkwardness, and much more. O-tanoshimi dane!

For all previous episodes of The Random Show, including the infamous China Scam episode, click here.

Can’t see the video above? Click here.

Want audio to listen on the go?  Here you go…

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

This episode is also brought to you by ExOfficio, which I’ve personally used since 2005 or so. They make ultra-lightweight, quick drying, antimicrobial clothing for men and women. Here’s my own ultra-light packing list (scroll down for video), which went viral.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What should other people be more grateful for this Thanksgiving? Perhaps something regularly overlooked? Please share in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Enjoy!

Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here. It keeps me going…

Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Selected Links from the Episode

Abbreviated Show Notes

  • Thoughts on WatchVille  [5:00]
  • The environment and new book recomendations [11:50]
  • Fermented coffee beans [18:45]
  • Tips for ice baths [24:45]
  • Tim’s next big thing (or not) [40:15]
  • How to get involved in the tech scene without tons of capital [42:25]
  • On Influence by Robert Cialdini [45:15]
  • Too Many Cooks video recommendation [49:35]
  • Gratitude this coming Thanksgiving [50:50]

People Mentioned

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Nick Ganju on The Majesty of Ping Pong, Poker, and How to Write Hit Songs

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ping-pong

(Photo: Foxxyz)
“It turns out that writing Tetris on your calculator doesn’t actually win you the cheerleaders.”
-Nick Ganju 

Housekeeping Note: The e-mail subscribers who won the SONOS PLAY:1 (The Best $200 on Sound) are Drew Glaser and Kristopher Chavez. Guys, keep an eye on your inboxes! Are you still not an e-mail subscriber? It’s free, no spam, and I send out awesome VIP exclusives. Click here to sign up, and you can always easily opt out.

In this episode, I talk to my old friend Nick Ganju about ping pong, poker, hit songs, and tackling my most feared subject (oh, the suspense!).

He makes complex subjects seem simple, which is a rare gift.  Nick is one of the few people I consistently ask for advice when trying to acquire tough skills.

Nick is the founder and CTO of ZocDoc, which allows you to find doctors and immediately book appointments online. As CTO, he is responsible for overseeing all software development. It’s a huge job for one of the fastest-growing startups in the US (6+ million monthly users, $95M+ in funding raised to date), and he’s repeatedly proven himself to be a master teacher.

Enjoy!

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

This episode is also brought to you by ExOfficio, which I’ve personally used since 2005 or so. They make ultra-lightweight, quick drying, antimicrobial clothing for men and women. Here’s my own ultra-light packing list (scroll down for video), which went viral.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY:  Have you overcome subjects or skills you initially found super-intimidating? What was the key moment? Please share in the comments.

Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here. It keeps me going…

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes

  • ZocDoc stats [6:34]
  • Rewinding the clock, comfort with computer science and global thermo-nuclear war [10:44]
  • What makes the University of Illinois a top computer science school [14:04]
  • “Coachablity” of computer languages and thoughts for those starting in computer science [16:14]
  • How to make it easier to develop high-level math and computer science skills [21:44]
  • Resources and books for optimizing your math/emotional intelligence skills [28:44]
  • Setting objective goals and how Monsters Inc. can help [30:14]
  • How to encourage measurable goal selection and tracking within your team [38:14]
  • Excel spreadsheets? [44:14]
  • Nick Ganju’s favorite movie [53:14]
  • Skill acquisition and the glory of ping pong [55:29]
  • How to practice ping pong when no one is around, plus the most common mistakes [1:02:44]
  • The daily rituals of Nick Ganju [1:05:44]
  • What it means to rid yourself of cognitive biases [1:06:29]
  • Cognitive Biases and how to price anchor like a god [1:11:14]
  • The Bill Gates-like life plan [1:16:04]
  • Rapid Fire Questions: Punchable, frequent plays, and how to get people hooked on music. [1:17:39]
  • Advice for the 20-year old Nick Ganju, or anyone seeking to rapidly develop business skills [1:25:14]
  • Choosing your fist gig or your next gig -> How to get started [1:27:14]

People Mentioned

36 Comments / Leave a comment or question

Margaret Cho on Comedy, Bisexuality, and The Slow-Carb Diet

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Margaret Cho on the Tim Ferriss Show

“My dog thought I was a singer… because dogs don’t understand standup comedy.”
-Margaret Cho [20:40]

[Housekeeping update: The demand for my $5K Holiday Megabox exceeded expectations, so I’m opening up a few more slots. First come, first served, and deadline is 11:59pm PT today, November 11, 2014. Click here for more details.]

Margaret Cho is a polymath.

She is an internationally acclaimed comic, actress, author, fashion designer and singer-songwriter. Perhaps you’ve seen her on the big screen, or in TV series such as Sex and the City and 30 Rock.

But well before she was on Dancing with the Stars (yes, she’s done that, too), she decided on her comedy career… at the tender age of eight.  The stage has been her constant companion ever since.

In this episode we delve into her comic influences and approaches, bisexuality, slow-carb adventures, and much more. Please indulge me as we dig deep into the lesser-known tricks of the Slow-Carb Diet. Margaret had a lot of detailed questions (she’s followed it for ~3 months), and the answers might help accelerate your own fat loss.  (If you want more, here are several case studies — with pics — who’ve lost 100+ pounds.)

Enjoy!

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

This episode is also brought to you by ExOfficio, which I’ve personally used since 2005 or so. They make ultra-lightweight, quick drying, antimicrobial clothing for men and women. Here’s my own ultra-light packing list (scroll down for video), which went viral.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What’s your favorite curse word — or phrase — and why? Please click here to let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Enjoy!

Who should I interview next? Please let me know on Twitter or in the comments.

Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here. It keeps me going…

Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Selected Links from the Episode

  • Explore Margaret Cho’s Writing:

I Have Chosen to Stay and Fight | I’m The One That I Want

Show Notes

  • What compels Margaret to perform stand-up comedy [3:30]
  • The early years of Margaret’s comedy career [4:50]
  • On the appeal of Joan Rivers and her immense gratitude [8:50]
  • Fearlessness and Margaret’s most fearful on-stage moments [11:30]
  • How to deal with hecklers [15:45]
  • Margaret’s inspirations [19:30]
  • Revealing intimate traits on stage and thoughts on female bisexuality [23:00]
  • The challenges of the isolated comedian lifestyle, and the potential for drug addiction [30:00]
  • Personality traits for those who gravitate towards stimulants vs. depressants [33:00]
  • The catalyzing moment when Margaret decided her prescription pill addiction needed to be fought [34:45]
  • Margaret Cho’s process for creating new material [40:30]
  • Why to hone an act (or product) internationally before bringing it to the USA – Note: Nike does this. [42:30]
  • “Successful” — who comes to mind? Does Margaret self-identify as successful? [48:00]
  • Clarifications on the Slow-Carb Diet and cheat day [50:30]
  • Hunger and human resilience [58:30]
  • Her death-row meal and why it’s changed since starting the SCD [1:10:30]
  • Margaret’s favorite curse word [1:11:45]
  • Stand-up pre-game rituals [1:13:45]
  • On Hollywood success and the types who aren’t tortured by it [1:16:10]
  • What attributes Dave Grohl exhibits, and why drummers tend to be positive people [1:17:30]

People Mentioned

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