Human Foie Gras — A Golden Opportunity

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foie-creative-commons

To kick things off, what is foie gras?

It can be explained with a short missive from our friend Wikipedia:

The California foie gras law, California S.B. 1520, is a California State statute that prohibits the “force feed[ing of] a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird’s liver beyond normal size”…

Former Senator John Burton called foie gras production “an inhumane process that other countries have sensibly banned.”

Given this outrage related to mistreating birds, you might be surprised to learn that human foie gras industries are booming.  Children’s livers are apparently particularly tasty. Not unlike veal, I suppose.

I’m putting $50K of my own money into related investments, but we’ll get back to that in a minute. First, some background…

For most of the 20th century, fatty liver and liver cirrhosis had two primary causes: drinking too much alcohol (e.g. Mickey Mantle) or hepatitis B or C (via IV drug use, unhygienic tattooing, tainted blood transfusions, etc.).

But in the last few decades, even infants are showing up with livers that should belong to hardcore alcoholics.  And the numbers aren’t small.

It’s estimated that one in ten American children now suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alongside 40 million affected adults. If you’re an obese Mexican-American boy, the odds are 50-50 (!) that you have NAFLD, thanks to genetic predisposition (PNPLA3 gene).

15 years ago, this disease was unheard of.  In 10 years, it’s projected to be the #1 cause of liver transplants. Put another way — In 2001, NAFLD was the reason for 1 out of every 100 liver transplants; by 2010, it was up a ten-fold to 1 in 10; by 2025, assuming nothing stems this tide, there could be five million Americans who need new livers because of it.

Who are driving this trend?

Some point fingers at good folks such as Coca-Cola, juice “cocktail” manufacturers, and the like.  Given that many researchers blame fructose, it’s not a huge stretch. Personally, the whole thing makes me sick.  I’d like to sic the best scientists in the country on them.

Ah, and this is where the good news comes in.

There is a way, albeit an indirect way, to do this. I implore you to read on and bear with me.  This is where it gets exciting.

The NIH alone has spent $155 billion on cancer research since 1972, and cancer survival is up a paltry 3% as a result. The US government spends over $25 billion EACH year on HIV/AIDS. That’s a lot of money.

One might assume fatty liver disease would require similar sums. After all, more American adults have NAFLD than prostate cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, or type 2 diabetes.

NAFLD

That’s the disconnect…and the opportunity to be part of history.

Enter the “Manhattan Project of Nutrition”

The Nutrition Science InitiativeNuSI–has been called the “Manhattan Project of nutrition.” They are run like a lean startup, and I’m proud to be a part of their advisory board.

They don’t take industry money, so they have no interests to protect.

They believe the NAFLD epidemic can be curtailed for a total of $50 million, but the whole domino effect starts with just $1 million.  It is a rare day in science when fundamental questions about an epidemic can be answered with such little money (respectively). It’s an incredible Archimedes lever.

For context, NuSI argues that there are dietary triggers of diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and fatty liver disease. To determine what the triggers are, NuSI assembles teams of the best scientists in the country (e.g., from Stanford, Harvard, Columbia, NIH, UCSF, UCSD, Emory, etc.) to fund and execute the kind of research nobody else is willing (or able) to perform.

For NAFLD, NuSI’s team of experts have designed three trials to determine the respective roles of too many calories, too many carbohydrates, and too much sugar–the leading three hypotheses–as dietary triggers.

In early 2015, this team will begin the first ever controlled clinical trial to see if removing sugars from the diet can reverse fatty liver disease in children.

40 kids with NAFLD will be split into two groups, with 20 simply observed on their normal diet as controls, and 20 provided with a diet that’s identical to what they usually eat, but completely devoid of added or refined sugars. The scientists’ hypothesis is that the sugar-free diet will at least stop the progression of NAFLD in these kids, and may even reduce the amount of fat in their livers.

If that’s the case, it’ll be the best evidence we have linking sugar to fatty liver disease.

My $50,000 Challenge…And How to Get Involved

I’m personally matching up to $50,000 for whatever is raised through this blog post, and every donation–big or small–makes a major difference.

Any donation is also a tax write-off, as NuSI is a non-profit organization (of course, speak with your tax advisor). Perfect for end-of-the-year giving.

NuSI is looking to raise $1 million dollars for the first of these three trials—the one that determines how the rest get done.  The snowball that starts the avalanche. There are few chances in the world to have this type of impact for this type of money.  Could it end up forcing labeling changes, product modifications, obligatory package warnings, policy shifts, and more?  I believe so.

Supporting this campaign very easy, and remember–I’m excited to be putting my own skin in this game.  I sincerely hope you join me.  Every bit counts.

There are three options:

1. Donate by credit or debit card. Visit: http://nusi.org/donate. Enter your donation amount, indicate “NAFLD — Tim Ferriss” in the message field, and click “Donate.”  Done.

2. Donate by check. Send your check to: NuSI, attention: Lacey Stenson, 6020 Cornerstone Court W. Suite 240, San Diego, CA 92121. Be sure to write “NAFLD – Tim Ferriss” in the memo line.

3. Donate by transferring securities (stocks, etc.). Email TimFerriss1million@nusi.org [remember the double “r” and double “s”] and they’ll do as much heavy lifting as possible.

Thank you for reading, and thank you for supporting if you’re able.  This is a good fight.

If you’d also like to hear a fascinating chat with Peter Attia, MD, co-founder of NuSI, I interview him here on radical sports experimentation, synthetic ketones, meditation, and more. He’s a competitive ultra-endurance athlete, MD, surgeon, and obsessive self-tracker, so we get along great :)


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Relevant reading and citations:

Browning JD et al. Prevalence of hepatic steatosis in an urban population in the United States: Impact of ethnicity. Hepatology, 2004.

Welsh JA, Karpen S, Vos MB. Increasing prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease among United States adolescents, 1988-1994 to 2007-2010. Journal of Pediatrics, 2013.

Targher G, Day CP, Bonora E. Risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The New England Journal of Medicine, 2010.

Dudekula A et al. Weight loss in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients in an ambulatory care setting is largely unsuccessful but correlates with frequency of clinic visits. PLoS One, 2014.

Kawasaki T et al. Rats fed fructose-enriched diets have characteristics of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis. The Journal of Nutrition, 2009.

Sanchez-Lozada LG et al. Comparison of free fructose and glucose to sucrose in the ability to cause fatty liver. European Journal of Nutrition, 2010.

Best CH et al. Liver damage produced by feeding alcohol or sugar and its prevention by choline. British Medical Journal, 1949.

Ouyang X et al. Fructose consumption as a risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Journal of Hepatology, 2008.

Abid A et al. Soft drink consumption is associated with fatty liver disease independent of metabolic syndrome. Journal of Hepatology, 2009.

Abdelmalek MF et al. Increased fructose consumption is associated with fibrosis severity in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hepatology, 2010.

Assy N et al. Soft drink consumption linked with fatty liver in the absence of traditional risk factors. Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology, 2008.

Stanhope KL et al. Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans. The Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2009.

Maersk M et al. Sucrose-sweetened beverages increase fat storage in liver, muscle, and visceral fat depot: a 6-mo randomized intervention study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2012.

Browning JD et al. Short-term weight loss and hepatic triglyceride reduction: Evidence of a metabolic advantage with dietary carbohydrate restriction. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2011.

Vos MB, Lavine JE. Dietary fructose in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Hepatology, 2013.
Chung M et al. Fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, sucrose, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or indexes of liver health: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2014.

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Writing with the Master – The Magic of John McPhee

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If I could study non-fiction writing with anyone, it would be John McPhee.

He is a staff writer at The New Yorker, a four-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and he won that award in 1999 for Annals of the Former World.  Even more impressive to me, he can turn any subject — truly, any subject — into a page turner.

An entire book about oranges? Check. Bark canoes? Done.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve raved about his books like a sweaty-palmed fan boy.  Personal favorites include the bite-sized Levels of the Game (about one epic tennis match), Coming into the Country (about the Alaskan wilderness), and his amazing collections of short stories (don’t miss Brigade de Cuisine in this one).

Now, a confession.  I did have the chance to study with McPhee as an undergrad at Princeton.  I still have all of the class notes.  I consider it one of the biggest strokes of luck in my life.  And… simply mentioning it makes me nervous as hell that I’m going to leave a typo in this post.  Besmirching the fine legacy of Professor McPhee!

Translated into my native Long Island-ese: If I fuck up anything in this post, it’s all my fault, and I didn’t listen to Professor McPhee well enough. He tried his best.

Now, moving on…

The below piece on McPhee is written by Joel Achenbach, a fellow graduate of McPhee’s class. Joel is now a staff writer for The Washington Post and the author of six books.

The profile recently appeared in the Princeton Alumni Weekly, and I absolutely had to share it with you. It’s the incredible story of a master writer, master teacher, and fascinating human being I aspire to emulate.  There’s so much to learn from McPhee, and the below is a laugh-out-loud sampling.

I’ve left in the graduation years to preserve the context.

Enjoy!

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John McPhee ’53 has many moves as a writer, one of which he calls a “gossip ladder” — nothing more than a stack of quotations, each its own paragraph, unencumbered by attribution or context. You are eavesdropping in a crowd. You take these scraps of conversation and put them in a pile. Like this:

“A piece of writing needs to start somewhere, go somewhere, and sit down when it gets there.”

“Taking things from one source is plagiarism; taking things from several sources is research.”

“A thousand details add up to one impression.”

“You cannot interview the dead.” 

“Readers are not supposed to see structure. It should be as invisible as living bones. It shouldn’t be imposed; structure arises within the story.”

“Don’t start off with the most intense, scary part, or it will all be anticlimactic from there.”

“You can get away with things in fact that would be tacky in fiction — and stuck on TV at 3 o’clock in the morning. Sometimes the scene is carried by the binding force of fact.”

The speaker in every instance is John McPhee. I assembled this particular ladder from the class notes of Amanda Wood Kingsley ’84, an illustrator and writer who, like me, took McPhee’s nonfiction writing class, “The Literature of Fact,” in the spring of 1982. In February, McPhee will mark 40 years as a Princeton professor, which he has pulled off in the midst of an extraordinarily productive career as a staff writer for The New Yorker and the author of more than two dozen books.

When the editor of this magazine asked me to write something about McPhee’s class, I knew it would be the easiest assignment ever, though a little nerve-wracking. It was, because most of McPhee’s former students have saved their class notes and marked-up papers (Marc Fisher ’80: “I’ve never lived anywhere without knowing where my notes from his class are”).

When I meet Rick Klein ’98 at a coffee shop down the block, we examine forensically Rick’s class papers and the McPhee marginalia, the admonitions and praise from a teacher who keeps his pencils sharp. McPhee never overlooked a typo, and when Rick (now the hotshot political director at ABC News) wrote “fowl” instead of “foul,” the professor’s pencil produced a devastating noose.

McPhee’s greatest passion was for structure, and he required that students explain, in a few sentences at the end of every assignment, how they structured the piece. (McPhee noted on a piece Rick wrote about his father: “This is a perfect structure — simple, like a small office building, as you suggest. The relationship of time to paragraphing is an example of what building a piece of writing is all about.”)

Rick reminds me that the class was pass/fail.

“You were competing not for a grade, but for his approval. You were so scared to turn in a piece of writing that John McPhee would realize was dirt. We were just trying to impress a legend,” he says.

Which is the nerve-wracking part, still. He is likely to read this article and will notice the infelicities, the stray words, the unnecessary punctuation, the galumphing syntax, the desperate metaphors, and the sentences that wander into the woods. “They’re paying you by the comma?” McPhee might write in the margin after reading the foregoing sentence. My own student work tended toward the self-conscious, the cute, and the undisciplined, and McPhee sometimes would simply write: “Sober up.”

He favors simplicity in general, and believes a metaphor needs room to breathe. “Don’t slather one verbal flourish on top of another lest you smother them all,” he’d tell his students. On one of Amanda’s papers, he numbered the images, metaphors, and similes from 1 to 11, and then declared, “They all work well, to a greater or lesser degree. In 1,300 words, however, there may be too many of them — as in a fruitcake that is mostly fruit.”

When Amanda produced a verbose, mushy description of the “Oval with Points” sculpture on campus, McPhee drew brackets around one passage and wrote, “Pea soup.”

That one was a famously difficult assignment: You had to describe a piece of abstract art on campus. It was an invitation to overwriting. As McPhee put it, “Most writers do a wild skid, leave the road, and plunge into the dirty river.” Novice writers believe they will improve a piece of writing by adding things to it; mature writers know they will improve it by taking things out. Read More

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The $5,000 Secret Santa and Other Goodies

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This is a housekeeping post with one time-sensitive update and smaller recommendations. It’s split into two parts:

  • The $5,000 Secret Santa
  • Bite-sized Recommendations: 2 Books, 2 Movies, 2 Tweets, and 2 Songs.

The $5,000 Secret Santa

The short version: I’ve decided to go crazy and do a one-time-only $5,000 Quarterly box. It’s limited to the first 1,000 people, and it will ship before December 25. For that reason, I’m calling it the “Holiday Mega-Box.”

If you’re interested in learning more, please click here. (Note: This is completely separate from the regular Quarterly subscription described below)

Normally, every three months, I ship out a box of amazing physical products with a personal letter explaining everything. It costs $100 per box, and thousands of people subscribe to it here. The theme is obsession–the ideas and objects I can’t get out of my head. Sometimes I’m hooked on a great travel gadget. Other times, I find an incredible book or productivity hack through my experiments. Here are the contents of some previous boxes. They’re often worth $200 or more and include custom items you can’t buy, liked original artwork from Simon Bisley or letters from authors, etc..

Interested in the absurd $5,000 box that’s destined to be unforgettable? Click here.

Interested in becoming a “curator” and creating your own boxes? Quarterly.co does all the legwork of procuring items (or manufacturing them), as well as fulfillment and customer service. Click here if interested.

Bite-Sized Recommendations

Here are a few things that have been capturing my interest recently: 2 books, 2 movies, 2 tweets, and 2 songs… Read More

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NOBNOM Winners and Other Updates

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2008 pic, RV breakdown en route to Burning Man. Shit happens, but that’s OK.

Ladies and gents!

A few updates:

1) If you missed instructions for the three quick-start videos from Tony Robbins, or his morning breathing routine and Cryotherapy, I’ve added the links here.

2) I’m so very sorry for the delay in announcing NOBNOM prize winners.  Many of you have rightly asked: What the hell, Ferriss?  Why the radio silence?

To that, I answer: Mea culpa. Alas, I simply get my ass kicked sometimes. This time around, a few things happened:

1) Lyme disease completely annihilated my health, which led to strong antibiotics for 8+ weeks, which…

2) Produced side-effects (on top of Lyme) that disrupted my digestion, created “food allergies,” and additional hospital visits.

3) The data set was huge! You guys asked and answered 1,000s of questions. It was amazing but exceeded all expectations. To organize and analyze everything took a while.  There is a fun wrap-up post in the works that will discuss the fascinating patterns and findings.

To try and atone for my tardiness, I’m adding $100 to all the prizes, so $600 (instead of $500) to the grand-prize winners, and $200 (instead of $100) to all of the others.  I know it’s nominal, but please accept my apologies.

If you won — names below! — please email Tony at tony at lift dot do (@lift.do).  He will also attempt to reach out to you, and you can also ping him on Twitter at @tonystubblebine.

Now, to the good stuff… Read More

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Ramit Sethi on Persuasion and Turning a Blog Into a Multi-Million-Dollar Business

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Ramit_Sethi

If you want detailed tactics and hilarity, Ramit Sethi is your man. Here one quote from this episode, to give you an idea: “Indian people don’t get punched, dude. We don’t get into fights. We’re doing spelling bees.”

Ramit Sethi built his personal finance blog up to 500,000+ readers per month, and has since turned it into a revenue generating monster. I don’t use that phrasing lightly. In this episode, we dig into the nitty-gritty tools, software, and experiments he’s used to turn a college side project into a multi-million-dollar business with 30+ employees.

Tons of amazing links and goodies below…

Stream with the player below:


If you can’t see the above, here are other ways to listen:

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

Also, how would you like to join me and billionaire Richard Branson on his private island for mentoring? It’s coming up soon, and it’s all-expenses-paid. Click here to learn more. It’s worth checking out.

QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: Do you think I should create a course of some type? If not (and if writing a book isn’t an option), what would you like to see me create next? What would be most helpful to you? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for all show notes.

Enjoy!

Who should I interview next?  Please let me know on Twitter or in the comments.
Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here.  It keeps me going…
Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

LINKS FROM THE EPISODE

Books Mentioned in the Episode

Entrepreneur Resources Mentioned in the Episode

  • Basecamp – Web-based project-management tool
  • Google Docs
  • Aweber – Email marketing and autoresponder software
  • Infusionsoft – A complete sales and marketing automation software for small businesses
  • Surveymonkey – Create and publish online surveys in minutes, and view results graphically and in real time
  • GitHub – Powerful collaboration, code review, and code management for open source and private projects.
  • Asana – A web and mobile application designed to enable teamwork without email.
  • Screenflow – Screen recording and editing software for Mac
  • Dropbox – A free service that lets you bring your photos, docs, and videos anywhere and share them easily
  • Wufoo - Online form builder with cloud storage database
  • Skype – A freemium voice over IP service and instant messaging client
  • Visual Website Optimizer – A/B Testing Software for Marketers
  • Umbel – a tool for understanding your audience

Documentaries Mentioned in the Episode

Show Notes

  • Why Ramit Sethi’s parents added the “R” to his original name, Amit
  • His grassroots beginnings as a personal finance teacher to friends
  • How his persistence garnered exposure for his blog in the Wall Street Journal
  • How his site functions like a laboratory
  • Why you only need to focus on caring for 1,000 die-hard fans
  • How a few world-class posts can change your life forever
  • The “secret recipe” for attracting lots of people to your posts and making them fall in love with your content
  • Ramit’s email practices and marketing techniques that generate 99% of his revenue
  • The entrepreneurial tools and software Ramit’s team uses to systematize the daily functioning of the business
  • A common email practice that people share as the “Law of God” that is completely false
  • Why you should encourage people to unsubscribe from your email list
  • How to sell a product without coming off like a spammy Internet marketer
  • Why Ramit turns away customers who have personal debt
  • What roles race and culture play in Ramit’s life
  • How I Will Teach You To Be Rich is like the Asian father some of us never had
  • His book recommendations for entrepreneurs
  • The longest lie his father ever told and why Ramit can’t wait to do the same to his children
  • The best investment he’s made for under $100
  • Email tips for building respectful relationships with busy people
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Tony Robbins and Peter Diamandis (XPRIZE) on the Magic of Thinking BIG

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If you want to 10x or 100x your results and impact, this interview with Tony Robbins and Peter Diamandis is a must listen.

Where else can you find two people who regularly advise everyone from Serena Williams to Bill Clinton, from NASA to the world’s fastest growing companies? Here’s their next project, if you want a sneak peek.

Stream with the player below:

If you can’t see the above, here are other ways to listen:

This podcast is brought to you by 99Designs, the world’s largest marketplace of graphic designers. Did you know I used 99Designs to rapid prototype the cover for The 4-Hour Body? Here are some of the impressive results.

Also, how would you like to join me and billionaire Richard Branson on his private island for mentoring? It’s coming up soon, and it’s all-expenses-paid. Click here to learn more. It’s worth checking out.

Now, on to this episode’s guests…  Note that show links are included below their bios.

TONY ROBBINS

Tony Robbins has consulted or advised international leaders including Nelson Mandela, Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher, Francois Mitterrand, Princess Diana, and Mother Teresa. He has consulted members of two royal families, members of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Army, the U.S. Marines and three U.S. Presidents, including Bill Clinton. Other celebrity clients include Serena Williams, Andre Agassi, golf legend Greg Norman, and Leonardo DiCaprio. Robbins also has developed and produced five award-winning television infomercials that have continuously aired on average every 30 minutes, 24 hours a day somewhere in North America since their initial introduction in April 1989.

PETER DIAMANDIS

Dr. Peter Diamandis has been named one of “The World’s 50 Greatest Leaders” by Fortune Magazine.

In the field of Innovation, Diamandis is Chairman and CEO of the X PRIZE Foundation, best known for its $10 million Ansari X PRIZE for private spaceflight. Today the X PRIZE leads the world in designing and operating large-scale global competitions to solve market failures. Diamandis is also the Co-Founder and Vice-Chairman of Human Longevity Inc. (HLI), a genomics and cell therapy-based diagnostic and therapeutic company focused on extending the healthy human lifespan. He is also the Co-Founder and Executive Chairman of Singularity University, a graduate-level Silicon Valley institution that studies exponentially growing technologies, their ability to transform industries and solve humanity’s grand challenges. In the field of commercial space, Diamandis is Co-Founder/Co-Chairman of Planetary Resources, a company designing spacecraft to enable the detection and mining of asteroid for precious materials.

Scroll below for all show notes.  Tons of amazing links and goodies…

Enjoy!

Who should I interview next?  Please let me know on Twitter or in the comments.
Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here.  It keeps me going…
Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Selected Links, Including Projects, Books, Etc.

BE SURE TO VISIT THE FIRST TWO TO SEE WHAT WE’RE WORKING ON

Global Learning XPRIZE

Indiegogo XPRIZE

Feeding America

XPRIZE

Ansari XPRIZE

TED AI XPRIZE

Jim Rohn

John Grinder

Clinton Global Initiative

Elon Musk TED Talk

Date with Destiny

BOOKS MENTIONED

The Spirit of St. Louis by Charles Lindbergh

Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Man Who Sold the Moon by Robert A. Heinlein

The Singularity is Near by Ray Kurzweil

As a Man Thinketh by James Alan

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl

The Fourth Turning by William Strauss

Generations by William Strauss

Slow Sex by Nicole Daedone

Mindset by Carol Dweck

Brain Rules by John J. Medina

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QUESTION OF THE DAY:  What books or resources have most inspired you to think BIGGER, to 10x your results or impact?

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The Tim Ferriss Show: Tracy DiNunzio on Rapid Growth and Rapid Learning

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tracy dinunzio in chair

This single interview with Tracy DiNunzio, founder of Tradesy, was recorded in three short parts.  You can:



This podcast is brought to you by The Tim Ferriss Book Club, which features a handful of books (4-6) that have changed my life.  Here is the list, including free samples of every one.

Also, how would you like to join me and billionaire Richard Branson on his private island for mentoring? It’s coming up soon, and it’s all-expenses-paid. Click here to learn more. It’s worth checking out — trust me.

Now, on to this episode’s guest…

Tracy DiNunzio is a killer. She’s the self-taught founder and CEO of Tradesy.com, which has taken off like a rocket ship. She’s raised $13 million from investors including Richard Branson, Kleiner Perkins, and yours truly, and board members include the legendary John Doerr. Tradesy is on a mission to make the resale value of anything you own available on demand. Their tagline is “cash in on your closet.”

Tracy is in the trenches 24/7, making it the perfect time to ask her… How has she created such high-velocity growth? How did she recruit the investors she did? What’s been her experience as a female founder? What are her biggest mistakes made and lessons learned? This multi-part series, fueled by wine, will answer all this and more.

Even if you have no desire to start your own company, this 3-part series will get you amped to do big things.

This episode touches on a lot of cool stuff. It’s a mini-MBA in entrepreneurship, hustle, and tactics.

Scroll below for all show notes.  Tons of amazing links and goodies…

Enjoy!

Who should I interview next?  Please let me know in the comments by clicking here.
Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, please leave a short review here.  It keeps me going…
Subscribe to The Tim Ferriss Show on iTunes.
Non-iTunes RSS feed

Show Notes and Select Links from the Episode

  • Tracy DiNunzio’s unlikely resume
  • How her business model reflects her lifestyle, and why that’s intentional
  • How another startup (and her bootstrapping) helped her find her husband
  • The story of bootstrapping her first company, Recycled Bride, and how she traded skills for food
  • Why the current day is the best (and worst time) to start an online company
  • How she funded and launched Tradesy
  • Why she chose venture capital rather than continuing to bootstrap
  • The trade-offs — the cons — of venture capital
  • Common mistakes Tracy made when she began pitching to investors
  • How the rules of dating apply to pitching investors
  • The creative way she found her CTO and technical co-founder… on Craigslist
  • Addressing the pink elephant in the room — What’s her experience as a woman in the tech start-up world?
  • The “Hail, Mary” that kept Tradesy going before its upswing
  • What attracted iconic investors like Sir Richard Branson and John Doerr to Tradesy
  • How to spend 13 million dollars without blowing it
  • Numerous resources for would-be entrepreneurs
  • Tracy’s advice to anyone who is unhappy in their current career

LINKS FROM THE EPISODE

Books Mentioned in the Episode

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QUESTION OF THE DAY: What startup resources (books, articles, interviews) have you found most helpful or inspiring? Please share in the comments!

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