Are Psychedelic Drugs the Next Medical Breakthrough?

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Tabernanthe_iboga_MS_4098

The iboga plant (Photo: Marco Schmidt)

DISCLAIMER: DO NOT USE ANY DRUGS OR SUBSTANCES WITHOUT CONSULTING A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL. THIS IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY.

“Be curious.” – Dr. Dan Engle

Martin Polanco (@Martin_Polanco7), M.D., is the founder and program director of Crossroads Treatment Center, based in Rosarito, Mexico. Crossroads specializes in helping patients conquer powerful addictions (heroin, cocaine, etc.) by using the African hallucinogen ibogaine and 5-MeO-DMT, also referred to as “the God molecule.” Martin’s areas of expertise also include addiction medicine and therapeutic neurotechnologies.

Dan Engle (@drdanengle), M.D., is a psychiatrist and neurologist, who combines functional medicine with integrative psychiatry to enhance regenerative health and peak performance. His prior and relevant experience includes traumatic brain injury (TBI) and working in the Peruvian jungle with plant medicines such as ayahuasca.

In this episode, we step outside the lines of traditional medicine and discuss impulse control, introspection, and self-awareness through the use of powerful psychedelic and hallucinogenic agents like iboga, ibogaine, and 5-MeO-DMT.

We also discuss flotation tanks, which can simulate or even replicate many of the benefits that can result from the use of psychedelic and psychotropic agents. So you don’t have to be willing to experiment with these drugs to receive something valuable from this episode.

If you are interested in optimizing your psychological performance, emotional control, and exploring alternative medicine, then this episode is for you. Enjoy!


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Want to hear more from a world-class scientist? Check out my conversations with James Fadiman, Ph.D. In the below episode, we discuss LSD and micro-dosing for creative problem solving, anxiety reduction, and more (stream below or right-click here to download):




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QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What other methods of alternative medicine and therapy are you interested in learning more about? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Enjoy!

Selected Links from the Episode

  • More background and history about the psychedelic iboga.
  • More background and history about the psychedelic ibogaine.
  • More background and history about the psychedelic ayahuasca.
  • Commonly prescribed benzodiazepines:

klonopin | xanax |  valium

  • More about traditional ayahuasca.
  • Quality resources for people who want to learn more about psychedelic drugs and their uses:

MAPS | IICEERS

Twitter | Crossroads Ibogaine Center 

  • Connect with Dr. Dan Engle:

Twitter | Temple of the Way of Light Ayahuasca Center in Peru | Onnit Labs

Show Notes

  • Dr. Dan Engle & Dr. Martin Polanco share their background experiences that led them to be working in the field of psychedelics [08:56]
  • Martin’s first experiences with psychedelics and Ibogaine [11:01]
  • The primary differences between Ayahuasca and Ibogaine [14:20]
  • Dan explains what happens when you experiment with Ayahuasca, and the most common characteristics during the experience [19:45]
  • What most people feel during the start of an Iboga experience, and the common characteristics reported after use [23:15]
  • The reasons some people don’t have visions while taking Ibogaine [26:34]
  • The commonly prescribed benzodiazepines that don’t allow people to have visions taking Ibogaine [27:44]
  • What happens to your central nervous system during an ibogaine experience [29:58]
  • How should people view the use of psychedelics? [36:24]
  • The scarier aspects of the iboga experiences, and how to prepare for them? [43:06]
  • Martin explains how iboga works on a chemical level and what types of addictions it can help [46:15]
  • The resources people can use to educate themselves about psychedelic drugs and current research [48:34]
  • The background of 5-MeO-DMT and how it is incorporated into his program [54:48]
  • Different uses for ayahuasca and 5-MeO-DMT [1:00:26]
  • The relative importance of plant medicine and non-traditional treatments [1:08:36]
  • How often should psychedelic treatments be used for the maximum effect [1:11:11]
  • How people can use psychedelics to help with traumatic brain injuries [1:16:30]
  • The first person who comes to mind when Dan and Martin think of the word successful [1:26:39]
  • The books Dan and Martin have given the most as gifts [1:28:45]
  • The quote or statement Dan would have on a billboard [1:31:01]
  • The advice Dan and Martin would give their 30-year-old selves [1:31:49]
  • Who should and shouldn’t try ibogaine [1:34:15]
  • Flotation theory and other entry points for psychedelic experiences [1:35:28]
  • The single ask or recommendation Dan and Martin have for The 4-Hour Workweek audience [1:44:50]

People Mentioned

Posted on: September 14, 2015.

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122 comments on “Are Psychedelic Drugs the Next Medical Breakthrough?

  1. I found the mention of REM sleep in this conversation extremely pertinent to my experiences when I was an undiagnosed narcoleptic. I would repeatedly succumb to these, often frightening, hallucinations (visual, auditory, and tactile). A more enjoyable, yet equally confusing behaviour was this profound sequence of visions that would often precede falling asleep (for fear of sounding overly woo-woo, I’ll refrain from providing examples).

    In order to be diagnosed, I had to partake in a multi-latency sleep test (MLST), where my mean sleep latency was 3 minutes and mean REM latency was 1 minute (!!) across four allotted nap periods. It is considered standard to achieve REM sleep 70-90 minutes after falling asleep.

    I am content with my routine now that I am diagnosed, so I am not seeking ‘advice’. But I was rather interested if anyone knew of (or could direct me) how such ‘out-of-self’ experiences would correlate with REM sleep.

    Either way, as a result of this I am now a strong advocate for napping as a means for consolidating memory (although I suspect this is much more easier and also beneficial for me, and perhaps not for the entire population). Maybe this explains how I was able to do so well academically even when limited for years to my zombie “auto-pilot” level of functioning whilst awake. Also I recently learnt that Winston Churchill was a keen napper, so hey, that helps.

    I feel like REM is a ‘missing piece’ that ought to compliment areas of neurology that would otherwise be profoundly beneficial findings. But this is most likely just due to my lack of knowledge towards most things science-related.

    Like

  2. Does anyone else get anxiety listening to Martin talk? I feel like his cadence is a little off; misplaced pauses, etc. Arrgghhh, I really wanted to listen to this but I couldn’t get through it. I enjoy listening to Tim (per usual) and Dan. I actually like what Martin is sayin but his odd vibe just makes me feel insane.

    Like

    • I found Martin’s voice to be calm and preferable. From my perspective he communicated respect and humility. It’s unfortunate that his timbre was a barrier that may have caused you to be distracted from his message. My sincere hope for you is that this type of annoyance is infrequent in your life. Happy Day🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Now that’s really interesting. I just wrote in my notes that I found Martin’s timbre to be quite fascinating, having some kind of metallic quality, in a good way. And aside from that the quality of the guests Tim invites is outstanding, as is often the case. I was blown away by Tim Hof, the Dutch Ice Man the other week…

      Like

    • I agree, He does sound like he is uncomfortable with what he’s saying, it seems as though he’s overdoing it and putting too much on it- Or he’s making it up.
      Strange that he didn’t say where he got his training for addiction medicine and therapeutic neurotechnologies. Dan explained where he got his training.
      Can we see some certifications Tim from Martins claims on his expertise?

      Like

      • Using an Oculus Rift in an isolation tank. I don’t have a Rift or an isolation tank, but it sounds like it would be great! Mediation for Oculus seems to make sense.
        Picture yourself lying on a beach in St. Martin at sunset listening to the waves. Slowly the sun sets and tide rises carrying you out to sea. As you float on the ocean listening to the roll of waves you peer up into a clear night sky blanketed with the brightest stars you have ever seen.
        The stars seem to getting closer and you realize you are floating up into the sky. You hear a slight hum like a mix of the sounds crickets and tree frogs.
        As you ascend the hum gets gets louder and more intense until you feel the vibration throughout your body.
        You keep ascending until you break the atmosphere and reach space. Complete silence. The stars and moons are brighter and clearer than you have ever seen before. You keep floating farther from the earth towards the edge of the galaxy. And so on.

        Hope that answers your question : )

        Like

  3. Thanks Tim for bringing awareness to these medicines!

    Psychedelics have been invaluable for treating my anxiety and OCD symptoms. I feel that every trip rewires my brain in a positive way and teaches me lessons that I remember daily. It’s truly a disgrace that these beautiful medicines have such a negative stigma, and that it’s socially acceptable to be medicated by substances that only mask symptoms and ignore the root causes. All I can say to anyone who’s a skeptic…. are you going to look back on your life and say “I’m glad I DIDN’T try that substance that some people claim gave them one of the most beautiful experiences of their life!” ? Don’t think so!

    Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

      • What if there aren’t any rewards? What if things are dredged up that are too difficult or the mind alters and breaks? If everyone responds differently, then, what are the risks if things go wrong? Also, how does a person who is really blocked (mentally) from staying on track with life goals, gain any betterment from doing one, two or more of these experiences?? I mean how are the symptoms (their personal issues) lessened by using psychedelics??

        Like

  4. Gracias Tim,
    I personally see this is where everything worth exploring will take form.
    Cautelous exploration of the more than 50 years of psychedelic lagged research is saved with this specific type of dialogues.
    Again, thanks for the heads up and nonetheless I won’t take dmt, ayahuasca, ibogaine or anything similar before heavy data and specific elegant processes have been developed.
    Which I hope comes at the same time our public opening is ready, simple easy to grasp elegant psychological development, or better if it comes before that.
    My two pennies worth from the low totem pole view, see you around!!!

    Like

  5. Love the podcast and the diversity of topics of which I am all keenly interested in. I would love to hear an interview with someone who about the long term benefits and effects of yoga and whether it has the ability to transform not only your physical state but your chemistry and your conscious relationship to your environment. This topic has been touched on with the discussion of mindfulness in many episodes and but I would like to hear it from the context of an experienced yogi.

    Like

  6. Please consider getting William Walsh on the podcast. He is a very science based creator of using nutritional therapy to deal with psychological disorders that were considered non-treatable and could only be manged. (I don’t mean eat whole food, I mean using blood work and samples to identify nutritional defects or toxic overload that would lead to the manifestation of a disorder such as cooper overload causing post-partum depression). Making bold claims that he could help put impossible mental disorders such as Autism, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer in remission. Anyway it goes with the same thread of what is on the horizon of the mental health field and moving from a reductionist medicating model to big picture getting to the root of the issue model. Some of his work is still in the theory stage and some has strong case studies.

    Like

  7. Tim, I enjoyed your book, the 5-bullet Friday emails, and the podcasts. In the email that came through today, you had mentioned Wealthfront. As a Wealth Manager (aka Financial Advisor), I tested out Wealthfront and found their investment mix poor and lacking performance. I like the cheap side but when my options are performing 1-1.5% per year better over a 10 year period, I’ve got to say something. I’d be happy to answer any questions.

    Like

  8. So fascinating…but it seems so hard to engage and do well by these substances. …which is unfortunate if it is as beneficial as it seems.

    In my experience, meditation can produce intense unitive and mystical experience too…but it takes focus and practice. It took me a few months…but I think my ability to lucid dream gave me an edge and cut down the time needed.

    …though I’m from an early-in-life Christian spiritual formation, my unitive experiences opened me up…Finding out many things, including that “God” is not a Christian or anything like I was taught…and it altered my perspective on spiritual experience, consciousness, and awareness. What I do hang on to is the personal/infinite paradigm of this “Source/Other”.

    Most faith/religious traditions contain this aspect of mystical experience and back to source experience through prayer/meditation (including Christianity, which is actually -orignally-Eastern in mindset) and it seems like this might be why humans have carried on with prayer and meditation to this level for so long in human history and will do so, worldwide, even if it seems rare (or woowoo) in the U.S..

    Essentially, the brain is the placebo.
    You might want to check out Ellen Langer (just featured on the podcast onbeing.org) has wonderful studies about placebo, mindfulness, perceived-time, and studies with language changes that enact tremendous healing and improvements in well-being (100% secular-based).

    Like

      • @Laura, I agree. There are many mind tools that can be used without the “aid” of drugs that potentially have the risk of altering a persons brain chemistry and even their personality for the negative. It’s not worth going to the extreme and taking the chance of hurting yourself either because of curiosity OR to escape. Someone close to me is too fascinated with the idea of trying these things and it really scares me. The fact is, mind-mining can create a break with reality and essentially F a person up. Ferris is someone he looks up to and it disturbs me… that he’s even considering this kind of ‘self-medicating’….

        Like

    • Interesting comment. I cannot meditate. Hallucinogens can break open your head and release the junk that is suppressed. They exist for a reason. They are not for everyone and they are not to be played with. They can be VERY beneficial if you use them to learn. Peyote will not be a party drug for a reason, it makes you vomit. BUT, if you want to learn about life or eliminate deep seated problems, it will heal you.

      Like

  9. My favorite part of this is how ancient these remedies are: and not just for healing, for spiritual transcendence. If you look through the earliest gods, they are almost always carrying poppy flowers (for obvious reasons) or wheat/grains – which could mean “bread of life” but could also hint towards ergot, and a naturally occurring form of LSD. Most of the gods were linked to visionary experiences or sacred journeys. The ancient mysteries were popular for over a thousand years, with every part of society traveling days to take part in a totally unique, totally “other” experience from normalcy. I’ve found a small daily dose of shrooms or ayahuasca (not enough to trip, just enough to feel good) keeps me in happiness and gratitude. Strong doses aren’t necessarily enjoyable, and generally, the deeper you go, the more ancient trauma (if you have any) is brought to the surface.

    Like

  10. Yayy! I’m so glad to see this up! I love Dr. Martin, and my experience at Crossroads last year was incredible. I have to say Tim, Iboga isn’t really terrifying. I guess it can be for some, but I feel like focusing on that aspect isn’t really convincing the people that need it to move toward treatment. I suppose it makes sense to consider all angles, but I must say that is wasn’t terrifying for me. It was incredibly beautiful and uplifting. I saw Goddesses who spoke words of encouragement to me, and had many peaceful visions. Yes, moments of it were a bit scary, but not any more than all of the other psychedelics!

    Like

  11. In response to your daily question regarding CAM, I think it would be interesting to hear a conversation on some of the up and coming uses for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and the potential to use it for precise neuromodulation targeting (both superficial and deep) for a variety of brain dysfunctions. There are very few experts in this field, but there are several on-going clinical trials, and one that I know of that is pairing it with imaging to get a better understanding of how/why/where/when it is working.

    Like

  12. QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What other methods of alternative medicine and therapy are you interested in learning more about?

    Extended fasting: 2-7 days.
    What are the applications? How-to do so safely? What are the potential benefits and risks?

    Like

  13. I wouldn’t label entheogens as alternative medicine; too many harmful associations, makes me think of rhino horns and deer penis.

    This is a neuropharmacological frontier, one that is increasingly accompanied by peer reviewed scientific literature. I think it’s an incredibly exciting and novel field.

    Question: what are the societal ramifications of proliferating psychedelic use? I used psychedelics for the first time about 2 years ago and my outlook on life has DRASTICALLY shifted, specifically in a socially liberal direction, I think because of a significant increase in empathy. What does this mean for a society that has classified these chemicals as having “no medical use?”

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Tim! I just got back from Costa Rica doing Iboga. I took notes throughout the entire experience and then recorded a 15 minute audio. Unbelievable healing experience. You might want to hear this.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Great interview! Thank you for pointing out how important it is to approach the plant teachers with respect and humility. Plant medicines prepared in the traditional manner and ceremonies with a trained vegetalista is going to give you a completely different experience than plants cooked in a crockpot served by your buddy. The later is a very bad idea and very disrespectful. I would not recommend it.

    Like

  16. Aubrey Marcus and Cory Allen had a conversation about something called “binaural beats” on the Aubrey Marcus podcast. It had to do with tricking the brain into different wave states with sound. Perhaps Cory Allen as a guest.
    Also author and mushroom expert Paul Stamets might be someone worth talking with. Thanks for everything.

    Like

  17. No time to listen to the podcast, but I’m already pretty familiar with psychedelics, and have tried several. Have you heard of microdosing LSD or psilocybin? That’s where you take a MUCH lower dose than you would need to see visuals or have powerful spiritual experiences– instead, you’re kind of perky and empathic all day, and everything just kind of goes your way.

    Like

  18. Oh, also, I’ve heard from friends that are seriously involved in iboga therapy in Mexico that western use of the iboga plant, much like with peyote, has been leading to severe shortages. Kind of like how quinoa use in the US has led to peruvians not being able to afford their traditional foodstuff, only it takes many years to grow these sacraments, they’re not crops, exactly. Just food for thought.

    Like

  19. Tim, could you start asking about evening rituals as well (or even daily rituals…not necessarily done during the evening or morning)? I read the book “The Way of the Seal” and he mentions doing evening rituals and they seem very powerful as well. Thanks for the awesome podcast! I look forward to each episode

    Like

  20. Tim, to understand the real effects of what these drugs are doing to the mind you need to understand what the mind actually is, how it stores memorys, how it mis-files memorys, how it looks at pictures, what it does with pictures and how psychidelic drugs cause it to make new pictures that really mess with the memorys and filing system of the person with many negative consequences.

    You are a smart man Tim, read Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. **Emphasis on Science**

    The next medical breakthrough will be in how thought, perception and emotions directly influences the body. Check out the work of the likes of Bruce Lipton and watch the trailer for the E-motion documentary.

    Like

  21. Tim, my man, you keep bringing it back around to the psychedelics. We’re really intrigued by the research about these things, but please hang up the phone when you get whatever message you’re looking for; the world needs more early-stage John C Lillys and not late-stage ones.

    Regarding float tanks: Some of the research on these for pain management and psychiatric benefits is impressive. I’ve personally had a HUGE short-term (1 week post float) anxiety reduction from the floats that I’ve taken. The first one in particular, for several days after, I was cognitively “outside” my anxious thoughts (like, the feeling would arise and I would go “oh, that’s anxiety” and then ignore it). Possibly something to do with the brain powering down the constant threat-scanning during the float, due to lack of an environment.

    I’m unsure of long-term benefit, but they were one of the big helpers for me (along with training working memory, exercise and social time) in recovering from the long-term effects of a medication-triggered psych emergency (which were basically identical to the cognitive damage from traumatic brain injury following an unintended psychedelic trip).

    Notes for anyone interested in the float stuff:

    1: Use a big tank if you can. Bumping against the walls is off-putting, and if you have a tight back/neck it can help to float with your arms over your head in a “hands up” gesture, or behind your head. I believe that the Float Center in Oakland has the biggest tanks in the Bay Area, not sure about other areas.

    2: Your mileage may vary on this, but go right before a sleep or nap, and go when you are not under the effects of stimulants (calculate your caffeine dosage that day, no cigarettes for a couple hours beforehand, etc.). You will sleep like a GOD afterward and the positive effects seem to last longer. Every time I went in the morning, I ended up dragging tail all day instead. This may only apply to the chronically sleep deprived.

    3: Earplugs. Good quality earplugs. Cannot stress this enough, not just because it is distracting but because of swimmer’s ear.

    Tim, RE Question of the Day: Have you checked out the Alexander Technique at all? It’s not the same as other similar-looking stuff; the basic concept is about learning to consciously override habitual patterns of movement and activity, which probably has some benefits beyond posture or pain management. Aldous Huxley was a huge fan. One caveat I’ve heard is that a lot of new-school teachers bring in new-age woo or baggage from other modalities. Still though, might be worth a look.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Tim! Please, please please interview Natalia Avseenko.

    On Mon, Sep 14, 2015 at 9:38 PM, The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss wrote:

    > Tim Ferriss posted: ” DISCLAIMER: DO NOT USE ANY DRUGS OR SUBSTANCES > WITHOUT CONSULTING A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL. THIS IS FOR INFORMATIONAL > PURPOSES ONLY. “Be curious.” – Dr. Dan Engle Martin > Polanco (@Martin_Polanco7), M.D., is the founder and program director of > Crossroads”

    Like

  23. Hi Tim. You may be interested in a book from Erika Dyck, Psychedelic Psychiatry;LSD On The Canadian Prairies..
    It is about LSD research in Saskatchewan Canada in the Mental Institution in Weyburn.
    It is available from Amazon.
    Great article, as usual.

    Like

  24. I bought the electronic version of 4 hour work week on nook and would like a blank dreamline please. CAn’t find it on the website. thanks.

    Like

  25. LOVED the interviews and what great, responsible and dedicated work from these two, ultra interesting and conscious men. I’m not sure why you, Tim, feel obligated to apologize for the “out there” factor. FINALLY we’re getting around to seriously exploring “spiritual technology”, for lack of a better term and there’s no need to relegate the process back into our oh-so-haggard and apologetic, solely reductionistic approaches. The latest and greatest scientific enterprise is the exploration of the brain and the nature of our “natural” existence with all of their psychological and spiritual implications.

    These two and you, Tim are yet more of the midwives courageously coming forward to give birth, to build the bridge back to our relationship with the entirety of where and how we exist.

    Thanks for this great conversation and I’ll look forward to more like it. And thanks to plant medicine and the way in which it beckons us all back into recognizing the whole shebang.

    Like

  26. I’ve been wanting to suggest this for a while now, but every recent episode it seems to me Peter Levine (researcher and psychotherapist, developer of Somatic Experiencing) would be the perfect guest for a future episode! He is such a pioneer in the area of PTSD/Trauma, but in general a ‘master psychologist’ with so much wisdom and expertise to share on areas such as nervous system regulation, transcendental experiences and a general understanding of us humans!

    Like

  27. Hi Tim,

    I’m a huge fan of your podcast. I don’t know if this is the right vehicle–or if you even taken interviewee suggestions–but there’s an individual who, combined with your energy and interview style, would make for a fascinating conversation:

    Col. Chris Hadfield (retired Canadian astronaut and author of multiple books on life as an astronaut)

    Like

  28. Tim I was wondering if you could talk more about your ayahuasca experiences. Where did you do it, how did you choose where you did it and with what shaman and what were your experiences and how did it benefit you.

    Another great guest to have on on this topic would be Chris Kilham, his latest book is Ayahuasca Test Pilots. You can find him at http://medicinehunter.com/

    Like

  29. Hi, I am a big Fan of the 4HWW “system” and I want to have a conversation, either in person, email or on the phone with Tim Ferriss. I am in Mexico but I have an idea of having a certificate coachs of the 4HWW system, so you can help a lot of people worldwide, having succesful start ups.
    Greetings!
    Guillermo Prieto.

    Like

  30. Very exciting cast. Tim I find it a bit curious that you seem a little apologetic or embarrassed about the fact that your experiences were profound and mystical and may have altered your atheistic world view or at the very least gave you some food for thought in that direction. I believe it was Sam Harris who said he would love to debate somebody who had the ability to make him rethink his position on something. If plant medicines did that for you, embrace it, respect it, and if possible share it. Clearly some psychedelic experiences are deeply personal and some are so profound you couldn’t find the words to share it if you wanted to. But if in your mental travels, you met a god, goddess, angel, demon or whoever, and they said something you found worthwhile, I for one would love to hear about it and I’m sure I’m not alone.

    I will extend the hand of sharing by offering a personal experience. I would like to propose that while group experiences have their place, what was not explored in the cast was how deeply two people can go together if they are lovers or close friends. In 1984 I took a very healthy dose of shrooms with a beautiful woman I was deeply in love with. The setting was nothing special, an average Hollywood apartment. It might be significant that she was a Krishna devotee and had an altar and art work dedicated to the Indian pantheon. When the visions began we ended up embracing without any sexual intent and talking about what we saw. Not unexpectedly, I saw her as Radha, the woman often depicted with Krishna in Indian religious art, It was photo real, I could see each jewel and each strand of thread in her garments. There was the sensation of “going down a level” as if we were on an elevator heading underground. The next level took us to a Greco Roman environment where I saw her as a more stately Athena- like goddess figure. We had stopped talking by this point and were so overwhelmed with love for each other that tears were streaming down our faces and there wasn’t the slightest question that we were exactly on the same wavelength. The descending of levels continued with each one more emotional profound and visually vivid. The last one was a Babylonian environment where I saw her as Ishtar. Draped in emeralds and green silk. She emanated feminine energy at an almost blinding intensity. When it wound down we were still embraced as tightly as possible, both of having the sense of a complete merging into one consciousness.

    Tim don’t be afraid to accept what you are offered by the plants and please share whatever you can. You are liked and respected by millions. If you saw an angel or goddess, and some idiot thinks you are weird because of it, fuck ’em.

    Like

  31. Great podcast and extremely fascinating. Seems we haven’t even scratched the surface of how far deep our mind can go and its full potential.

    Would warn that if anyone has aspirations to go into the military(or any gov’t job that needs a security clearance) or become a pilot, to not experiment as this would be a permenant disqualification mark.

    QOTD- I’m very interested to learn more about non-traditional healing methods using acupuncture or pressure point methods.

    Like

  32. Hey tim! Loving the willingness to go into psychedelics and the awesome terrain therein. I interviewed one of Dan’s colleagues on MDMA assisted psychotherapy on my podcast. You might enjoy it as well as my interviews and posts on ayahuasca.

    Dr Vanderveer might be a good interview down the road if you want to discuss MDMA.

    Rock on!

    Like

  33. Risks are expected with psychedelics but we cannot just shut down the idea because benefits come along with it.

    I have read the comments of few people since I’m not sure how I should go from here. I’m just depending on what information should be added on this talk.

    Like

  34. Tim do you have any experience with the neurofeedback training from biocybernaut? It’s the one popularized by Dave Asprey as “40 years of Zen.”

    Like

  35. Dear Tim,
    You will like it. This fits into the body experiments that you do.
    Please explore the “alternative medicine” that treats the relation between DENTAL OCCLUSION, BALANCE and symmetry of the body, posture and spine and neurological movement disorders (Dystonia, postural collapse, Tourette’s, Parkinson’s).
    (The quotes in “alternative” come from the fact that it is actually a more scientific approach than dental “pseudo-science” which is largely based on esthetics)
    I was a 42 year old athlete running 10k and swimming 1K several times a week until a negligent dental treatment caused my body to collapse, my skull to “sink” and my spine to get twisted. Within 24 hours I was “Stephen Hawking” like twisted and dystonic, with severe neurological symptoms.
    In my blog I describe the experimental treatment with “do it your own” home made dental splints that allowed me to recover health.
    I did extensive research and found out that mainstream dentistry is based on opinions, many dangeorus myths and fallacies. It ignores the scietific evidence while there are hundreds of thousands of sufferers and hindreds of top notch dentists who try to fix damage done by other dentist.
    Please start with this post in my blog (“can you trust your dentist?” It.went viral) and browsethorugh the blog.

    http://wp.me/p5BXae-6t

    I realky think that this is a subject that can really interst you and your readers. You may even want to try to build your own splint producing orthopedic forces (with a bio mechanic lever effect centered on molar teeth) that stretch and allign your spine. For a few days. It will blow you away. I promise.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. What a great episode, Tim!
    I’ve tried recently the floating tank for the first time and, oh boy, that was an experience! I was inspired by the book “You must be joking, Mr Feynmen”, by the way. Despite of the fact that I’ve been meditating regularly for years, the hour in the floating tank revealed a lot of things for me. I couldn’t just shut my thoughts down. When you are left alone only with your head and no other senses, it’s quite shocking first. I can’t say that was a very pleasant experience… I was able to come down and achieve total silence in my head after around 30-40 minutes only.
    Your discussion inspired me though to try it consistently for a couple of weeks. I totally see how it could be really beneficial.

    I would definitely like to learn more about lucid dreaming. Would you share your experience and how in particular can you use lucid dreaming for self exploration?

    Like

  37. Tim Thank you so much for having a great interview with two very qualified people to talk about the subject. I have done 3 Ayahuasca ceremonies myself, and man this medicine is powerful. I think this podcast really helped me get a better understanding of the medical applications. I’m not suffering from any addictions, but I have read about this work being done with addictions before. I saw a TedX talk about it earlier this year. This was much more informative because of your experts and you having tried this yourself. I can attest that it was very accurate, from the descriptions you all gave about what you have experienced. I have only worked with Ayahuasca. Not sure I’m ready for ibogaine. Have you worked with Cambo? The poison from the frog that you guys briefly discussed. It was presented to me, but sounded like it was going to be a rough detox.

    Like

  38. Thanks very much Tim Ferriss! Love all the podcasts, this one was amazing and well done for speaking about these types of topics. Just wanted to add a book recomendation for psychadelics – “Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution” by Terence McKenna

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Another wickedly valuable and informative Podcast Tim. I am still blown away how in the information age, and baring in mind these are free Podcasts, there are so many useful nuggets that people can apply to enrich their lives. As in everything research (in this instance), application and action all play a part. Appreciate everything you do. Cheers

    Like

  40. Tim,

    One psychedelic not mentioned is ketamine. I’m an anesthesiologist and routinely use ketamine infusions on opioid tolerant patients for its “de-escalating” effect (multiple research studies showing improved pain control and opioid sparing effects). Ketamine has also been successfully used to treat refractory depression and fibromyalgia. Pharmaceutical companies are trying to develop a ketamine derivative that eliminates the hallucinations that are considered a side effect. It will be interesting to see whether the psychedelic component of ketamine therapy provides benefit independent from its action as an NMDA antagonist (hypothesized to be the mechanism for its therapeutic effect).

    Jason (class of ’02 and one of your Sympoh compatriots)

    Like

  41. Hi Tim,
    Have you heard of the research done on Matthieu Ricard as presented in the book Destructive Emotions? Ricard was able to suppress the startle reflex while under three different meditative states. At the time of that publication he was described as Oser, a German national, instead of the Frenchman that he is. He was “revealed” in The Wisdom of Compassion by Victor Chan. I’m asking to get your view on meditation. Is it at best a transformative tool, or an elaborate form of denial at worst, or even a sophisticated coping mechanism? In the life story of the Buddha, after his enlightenment, he was reported to be able to see all his past lives, but they no longer affected him or caused him to produce more negative karma – actions. By this example the past is not, and cannot, be wiped away, the “healing” is in the transformation of ones view, and therefore response to, the past which is the “liberation”. In Buddhist practice, as far as I understand it, the past is brought up, not to be gotten rid of, but examined, and the ineffective conditioned response is de-conditioned. So the seed, or karma, does not produce the same fruit. In some traditions, like the one Larry Brilliant M.D., former Executive Director of Google.org and founder of the Seva Foundation, is from, teaches the natural giving up of ineffective patterns through an evolving preference of the effective response rather than the rejection of the ineffective response or behavior. It is the notion that the flower doesn’t fight the winter cold, but blossoms with the warmth of the spring. Doctor Brilliant is a peer of Doctor Richard Alpert aka Ram Dass, the original researcher of psychedelics. If possible, could you share what you’ve so far concluded?

    Like

    • Hi Matt. The sparing amounts of criticism found online are unfortunately fraudulent postings made by competitors which are meant to deter potential visitors. What is posted is absolutely false claims. I encourage you to visit The Crossroads Treatment Center’s website to read and view via video the many many positive testimonials by actual patients and reviews by respected publications and news programs as well as the bios of affiliated healing programs, clinicians and therapists : https://crossroadsibogaine.com/. Crossroads Treatment Center staff is also more than happy to answer any questions you may have about the program : 866- 956-7756. We look forward to helping you! Blessings!

      Like

  42. I look forward to listening to this podcast when I have some time, and think it is great that Tim is exploring psychedelics, which I do believe are about the most potent tools to actualising human potential that we have.

    Myself, I’m just about to explore float tanks AND psychedelics, for the 1st time tomorrow!, inspired by James Jesso’s experiments he highlights in his book “The True Light of Darkness”

    [Moderator: link removed]

    I don’t believe for most people that float tanks by themselves can take them where these plants can take us, and besides, there are so many medicinal aspects to taking plant medicines like ayahuasca, Iboga and DMT/Changa, which I go into, in my book “Articulations: On The Utilisation and Meanings of Psychedelics”

    I’ll probably have more comments on this podcast later.

    Like

  43. Thanks for another awesome podcast Tim! I am fascinated hearing more about these substances and how mind expanding is becoming more accessible and acceptable. I have many, many friends who have said that Ayahuasca has changed their lives for the better. After listening, I decided to book my first 3 sessions at a local floatation center. Thanks for the suggestion Dr. Dan!!!!

    Like

  44. Quick question for Tim and the community:

    Your guests mention that two 2 hour sessions per week for a month in a float tank can reap immense benefits. The typical meditation recommendation is 20-40 minutes per day every day. Have there been any discussions of a “hardcore” meditation schedule (eight 2 hour sessions in a month)?

    Like

  45. Dear Tim, i love your work and as an ADD guy (found out 2 years ago, always felt stupid, lazy and messy before) im interested in alternatives to ritalin or amfetamines like it.

    Stuff like fish oil, meditation, sports, GTD procedures and other routines greatly help but it seems i need ritalin for a normal level of productivity. Issue is the side effects are strong and not nice to relationships and to my body.

    Do you have any idea to help out?

    Christer from Holland

    Like

  46. My favorite podcast yet Tim, and I’ve been a listener and reader for several years now. Maybe the most important podcast you’ve done!

    An expert acupuncturist would be an interesting guest to have, especially one experienced in releasing emotional trauma.

    As another commenter commented, Paul Stamets would be awesome too.

    ‘Thank you’ falls short when it comes to all I’ve gleaned from you over the years. You’re the best, man!

    Liked by 1 person

  47. I have never been one for drugs, so I quickly took to the idea of a float tank. I bought an unlimited monthly membership at a place near my house, Nova Center (formerly LA Float Center). Last night was my first session, and have to say nothing really interesting happened. I focused on relaxing my muscles and breathing but my mind was still going. I’ll be back for 2-3 sessions a week and see what practice brings.

    Like

  48. Tim, I wonder if perhaps you could do a segment on binaural beats some time. I have meditated sporadically for 40 years and, upon learning about binaural beats 10 years ago, I began to to use the guided meditations with embedded binaural beats of Robert Monroe and the Monroe Institute on a regular basis with intense results – often at the level of a mild hallucinogen.
    I have witnessed some rather unbelievable results from this practice in terms of mental acuity, clairvoyance, health, and age reversal in individuals whom I know, and who practice regularly.
    This topic should fit right in with your interests in heightened states of awareness, meditation, brain changes, trauma healing, and neuroscience as it has been thoroughly studied and applied in all of these fields. In 1978, the U.S. military evaluated the Monroe Institute and arranged to send officers there for training. In 1983, it sent further officers. The Monroe Institute, During this time TMI was involved in training some of the personnel who are featured in the movie “The Men Who Stare at Goats”. TMI’s Wikipedia page has further notes and references in case you are interested.

    Like

  49. Really enjoyed this episode, Tim. If there is a follow up interview, I’d love to get Dan and Martin’s take on near death experiences that create “DMT like” states.

    Like

  50. I tried a flotation tank today for 60 minutes and absolutely hated it. I was tense, anxious, panicked, muscles cramping and bumping into the walls the whole time. Eventually I had to turn on the light in the tank and use a flotation pillow, which helped with the panic and a bit with the tension, but I still feel really disappointed. Can anyone offer any advice? Should I try again or is it just not for me? (V. frustrating given the high cost!!)

    Like

    • “Can anyone offer any advice?”

      Advice. Yes i can offer some, and hopefully, helpful too.

      I had a two-hour float on the same day, Wednesday from 7 – 9 pm. It was GREAT, really wonderful. I hardly needed to sleep that night. Awakened Thursday morning totally refreshed and energized.

      Varia, Hi. Stuart here.

      First, i agree with, “frustrating given the high cost!! – I Totally Get you THERE!

      “Should I try again or is it just not for me?”
      IMHO, Yes, you should try again, and soon. In fact, your the perfect candidate for another float, since your first experience was not about floating, but about resistance to floating.

      You write, “I…absolutely hated it. I was tense, anxious, panicked, muscles cramping and bumping into the walls the whole time.”

      OK, next time, try a two-hour float without pillows or lights – and if and when the panic starts – resolve to mindfully go deeper with your awareness into your body – peace and safety is inner, it’s referred to as inner peace for a reason – so when you go inner, it’s toward peace and away from anxiety. This takes time and effort, yet in floats, that’s the reward! Inner Peace!

      And the next time, work on picking up the sense-impressions from within your neural cord. In other words, go into the float-experience with an assignment. You strike me as a personality, who is extremely adept, you just need patience.

      Begin at the base of your spine. Stay there in the pelvic region until you pick up a strong signal from your BODY. Follow that sense-impression signal to the tips of your presence. Notice your energy-body emerge, your chi, circulating within you. And now, extend that real physical sense-impression of YOU, and with a relaxed and non forced manner, comfortably extend yourself outward from your SENSES and not your MIND. Grow out into the world from your inner peace.

      Said without rebuke, harshness or criticism, however, i think your problem was this, you were attempting to have a mental experience which excluded the body, when in floating, you begin with the body at rest, and journey into fortitude of calmness – which is infinite resolve. Peace is a resolution, it’s the solution to personal happiness.

      [Moderator: Email address removed]

      Like

      • One more point, concentration : IS : “time and effort”. Focus : IS: “sight and sense”.

        Varia, What i am saying is this: your at the “Stage in Life”, when you shift mentally from “Focus to Concentration”.

        Focus is for adolescents and Concentration is what Adults do. So Varia, your
        actually on THE CUSP of a HUGE F’ing breakthrough – good luck – /.

        Like

    • One more point, concentration : IS : “time and effort”. Focus : IS: “sight and sense”.

      Varia, What i am saying is this: your at the “Stage in Life”, when you shift mentally from “Focus to Concentration”.

      Focus is for adolescents and Concentration is what Adults do. So Varia, your
      actually on THE CUSP of a HUGE F’ing breakthrough – good luck – /.

      Additionally, let me add Varia, for yourself, though not for everyone, that you enter the tank with a Visualization of Who You Really Are : “As an Adult” :. And for this we go to art, Rodin’s : ‘The Thinker’ : the tinkerer : into details and not interoffice. Here’s a link:

      Add a bit of ‘Official” (not actually offal) description of significance of :The Art:
      AUGUSTE RODIN (1840 -1917)
      THE THINKER
      MONUMENTAL
      1903
      青铜
      H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
      S.2838
      When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanum, The Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

      While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of Hell, The Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
      – See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.nkFPFxYE.dpuf

      Now, for a comparison of the FeMale Form thinking, try this: https://www.victoriassecret.com/swimwear

      Ok, with an ‘idealized body image’ enter the tank and notice : this : as your sense of self, as only this, idealized body image’, you get to replace ‘ THE HEAD’, yes of course it’s not you, though the ‘content will become the form soon enough’, and no more is The Thinker, me, or any other guy, it’s positive imaging : it’s : ‘is Visioning’ : your future : ‘States’ :.

      OK, two realities exist, That of Form, and That of Content.

      Prostitution represents The Form of Love
      Marriage represents The Content of Love

      The Only Love is The Love of God.

      OK, The Path of Love begins in form and moves over to content, when the time is Right, This is Your Time.

      “Psychedelic and psychotropic agents” are about content.

      The Float tank is about Form. – i think i’ve said enough – not everything i wanted to, but email if you would like to know more.

      Like

    • “Can anyone offer any advice?”

      Advice. Yes i can offer some, and hopefully, helpful too.

      I had a two-hour float on the same day, Wednesday from 7 – 9 pm. It was GREAT, really wonderful. I hardly needed to sleep that night. Awakened Thursday morning totally refreshed and energized.

      Varia, Hi. Stuart here.

      First, i agree with, “frustrating given the high cost!! – I Totally Get you THERE!

      “Should I try again or is it just not for me?”
      IMHO, Yes, you should try again, and soon. In fact, your the perfect candidate for another float, since your first experience was not about floating, but about resistance to floating.

      You write, “I…absolutely hated it. I was tense, anxious, panicked, muscles cramping and bumping into the walls the whole time.”

      OK, next time, try a two-hour float without pillows or lights – and if and when the panic starts – resolve to mindfully go deeper with your awareness into your body – peace and safety is inner, it’s referred to as inner peace for a reason – so when you go inner, it’s toward peace and away from anxiety. This takes time and effort, yet in floats, that’s the reward! Inner Peace!

      And the next time, work on picking up the sense-impressions from within your neural cord. In other words, go into the float-experience with an assignment. You strike me as a personality, who is extremely adept, you just need patience.

      Begin at the base of your spine. Stay there in the pelvic region until you pick up a strong signal from your BODY. Follow that sense-impression signal to the tips of your presence. Notice your energy-body emerge, your chi, circulating within you. And now, extend that real physical sense-impression of YOU, and with a relaxed and non forced manner, comfortably extend yourself outward from your SENSES and not your MIND. Grow out into the world from your inner peace.

      Said without rebuke, harshness or criticism, however, i think your problem was this, you were attempting to have a mental experience which excluded the body, when in floating, you begin with the body at rest, and journey into fortitude of calmness – which is infinite resolve. Peace is a resolution, it’s the solution to personal happiness.

      Like

      • Very interesting, helpful, and actionable advice. I think you’re spot on that I was trying to exclude the body whereas I actually needed to embrace the sensations. Thank you so much!

        Like

    • this is the first comment : somehow they got reversed.

      “Can anyone offer any advice?”

      Advice. Yes i can offer some, and hopefully, helpful too.

      I had a two-hour float on the same day, Wednesday from 7 – 9 pm. It was GREAT, really wonderful. I hardly needed to sleep that night. Awakened Thursday morning totally refreshed and energized.

      Varia, Hi. Stuart here.

      First, i agree with, “frustrating given the high cost!! – I Totally Get you THERE!

      “Should I try again or is it just not for me?”
      IMHO, Yes, you should try again, and soon. In fact, your the perfect candidate for another float, since your first experience was not about floating, but about resistance to floating.

      You write, “I…absolutely hated it. I was tense, anxious, panicked, muscles cramping and bumping into the walls the whole time.”

      OK, next time, try a two-hour float without pillows or lights – and if and when the panic starts – resolve to mindfully go deeper with your awareness into your body – peace and safety is inner, it’s referred to as inner peace for a reason – so when you go inner, it’s toward peace and away from anxiety. This takes time and effort, yet in floats, that’s the reward! Inner Peace!

      And the next time, work on picking up the sense-impressions from within your neural cord. In other words, go into the float-experience with an assignment. You strike me as a personality, who is extremely adept, you just need patience.

      Begin at the base of your spine. Stay there in the pelvic region until you pick up a strong signal from your BODY. Follow that sense-impression signal to the tips of your presence. Notice your energy-body emerge, your chi, circulating within you. And now, extend that real physical sense-impression of YOU, and with a relaxed and non forced manner, comfortably extend yourself outward from your SENSES and not your MIND. Grow out into the world from your inner peace.

      Said without rebuke, harshness or criticism, however, i think your problem was this, you were attempting to have a mental experience which excluded the body, when in floating, you begin with the body at rest, and journey into fortitude of calmness – which is infinite resolve. Peace is a resolution, it’s the solution to personal happiness.

      Like

  51. I am at the point where I’ve tried all of the traditional methods (and some untraditional) to deal with my ongoing major depression but have never done Ayahuasca or psychedelics. I’m off anti-depressants and doing daily meditation but it isn’t enough to make me want to live a long life. I’ll try floating first but I’m open and ready to try something like Ayahuasca. I am not a “walk on the wild side” type of person and would only do it in a safe and supervised and supportive environment. Preferably with a doctor around. Where do I go? Who do I trust? I definitely do not want to go to an isolated village in Peru or some sketchy commune in NorCal or any tweaker pad to be raped. That would not be good.

    Like

  52. Sometimes, two things can NOT BE compared.

    Two days ago, i spent two-hours in a floatation tank, and that’s because, eight days ago an ambulance rear-ended our stopped-car, i was the passenger and now my body is seeking a new alignment.

    I’ve had over fifty float sessions – your comment, “flotation tanks, which can simulate or even replicate many of the benefits that can result from the use of psychedelic and psychotropic agents” is ersatz speculative science.

    In other words, your reasoning combines the uncombinables and your neither insightful about what you appear to know, “psychedelic and psychotropic agents” or informationally present we speaking of what you don’t appear to know, flotation tanks.

    In a floatation tank, sense-impressions are the guide. And Sense-Impressions are a part of the physical-world, you can feel yourself, and your ‘psychic journey’s are grounded in the SENSE-world – this is known as moving-matter.

    The use of ‘psychedelic and psychotropic agents’ is a part of our knowledge-world of self-awareness, and a part and parcel of our non-Sense world, that of MIND, psyche, and is known as lucid-material.

    Now, ‘moving-matter’ and ‘lucid-material’ appear to relate. Don’t relate them, or you will know neither.

    The world of the senses and the world of the psyche, the twain shall never meet. Otherwise, we’d all be bang ganging whores.

    So, don’t compare the possibilities of passionate whoredom with love within marriage. Yes they “look and feel the same” but they’re not. IMHO

    Like

      • “Can anyone offer any advice?”

        Advice. Yes i can offer some, and hopefully, helpful too.

        I had a two-hour float on the same day, Wednesday from 7 – 9 pm. It was GREAT, really wonderful. I hardly needed to sleep that night. Awakened Thursday morning totally refreshed and energized.

        Varia, Hi. Stuart here.

        First, i agree with, “frustrating given the high cost!! – I Totally Get you THERE!

        “Should I try again or is it just not for me?”
        IMHO, Yes, you should try again, and soon. In fact, your the perfect candidate for another float, since your first experience was not about floating, but about resistance to floating.

        You write, “I…absolutely hated it. I was tense, anxious, panicked, muscles cramping and bumping into the walls the whole time.”

        OK, next time, try a two-hour float without pillows or lights – and if and when the panic starts – resolve to mindfully go deeper with your awareness into your body – peace and safety is inner, it’s referred to as inner peace for a reason – so when you go inner, it’s toward peace and away from anxiety. This takes time and effort, yet in floats, that’s the reward! Inner Peace!

        And the next time, work on picking up the sense-impressions from within your neural cord. In other words, go into the float-experience with an assignment. You strike me as a personality, who is extremely adept, you just need patience.

        Begin at the base of your spine. Stay there in the pelvic region until you pick up a strong signal from your BODY. Follow that sense-impression signal to the tips of your presence. Notice your energy-body emerge, your chi, circulating within you. And now, extend that real physical sense-impression of YOU, and with a relaxed and non forced manner, comfortably extend yourself outward from your SENSES and not your MIND. Grow out into the world from your inner peace.

        Said without rebuke, harshness or criticism, however, i think your problem was this, you were attempting to have a mental experience which excluded the body, when in floating, you begin with the body at rest, and journey into fortitude of calmness – which is infinite resolve. Peace is a resolution, it’s the solution to personal happiness.

        One more point, concentration : IS : “time and effort”. Focus : IS: “sight and sense”.

        Varia, What i am saying is this: your at the “Stage in Life”, when you shift mentally from “Focus to Concentration”.

        Focus is for adolescents and Concentration is what Adults do. So Varia, youractually on THE CUSP of a HUGE F’ing breakthrough – good luck – /.

        Additionally, let me add Varia, for yourself, though not for everyone, that you enter the tank with a Visualization of Who You Really Are : “As an Adult” :. And for this we go to art, Rodin’s : ‘The Thinker’ : the tinkerer : into details and not interoffice. Here’s a link:

        Add a bit of ‘Official” (not actually offal) description of significance of :The Art:
        AUGUSTE RODIN (1840 -1917)
        THE THINKER
        MONUMENTAL
        1903
        青铜
        H. 189 cm ; W. 98 cm ; D. 140 cm
        S.2838
        When conceived in 1880 in its original size (approx. 70 cm) as the crowning element of The Gates of Hell , seated on the tympanum, The Thinker was entitled The Poet. He represented Dante, author of the Divine Comedy which had inspired The Gates, leaning forward to observe the circles of Hell, while meditating on his work. The Thinker was therefore initially both a being with a tortured body, almost a damned soul, and a free-thinking man, determined to transcend his suffering through poetry. The pose of this figure owes much to Carpeaux’s Ugolino (1861) and to the seated portrait of Lorenzo de’ Medici carved by Michelangelo (1526-31).

        While remaining in place on the monumental Gates of Hell, The Thinker was exhibited individually in 1888 and thus became an independent work. Enlarged in 1904, its colossal version proved even more popular: this image of a man lost in thought, but whose powerful body suggests a great capacity for action, has became one of the most celebrated sculptures ever known. Numerous casts exist worldwide, including the one now in the gardens of the Musée Rodin, a gift to the City of Paris installed outside the Panthéon in 1906, and another in the gardens of Rodin’s house in Meudon, on the tomb of the sculptor and his wife.
        – See more at: http://www.musee-rodin.fr/en/collections/sculptures/thinker#sthash.nkFPFxYE.dpuf

        Now, for a comparison of the FeMale Form thinking, try this: https://www.victoriassecret.com/swimwear

        Ok, with an ‘idealized body image’ enter the tank and notice : this : as your sense of self, as only this, idealized body image’, you get to replace ‘ THE HEAD’, yes of course it’s not you, though the ‘content will become the form soon enough’, and no more is The Thinker, me, or any other guy, it’s positive imaging : it’s : ‘is Visioning’ : your future : ‘States’ :.

        OK, two realities exist, That of Form, and That of Content.

        Prostitution represents The Form of Love
        Marriage represents The Content of Love

        The Only Love is The Love of God.

        OK, The Path of Love begins in form and moves over to content, when the time is Right, This is Your Time.

        “Psychedelic and psychotropic agents” are about content.

        The Float tank is about Form. – i think i’ve said enough – not everything i wanted to, but email if you would like to know more.

        Like

  53. I found your podcast the other day and love it. This episode, in particular, brought to mind an idea of a topic that I would find so interesting (and hopefully others would too!). Would you consider doing a podcast based on the rhetoric of controversial topics? (To bring up one of the most prevalent: think pro-life vs. pro-choice.) When I was listening to this episode, it struck me that both interviewed experts did not use the word “trip” to describe the psychedelic experiences mentioned. The closest thing I heard was “journey,” which I think truly speaks to the general societal understanding of such experiences. Generally speaking, the term “trip” has become marginalized while, in your podcast (and I assume the pro-psychedelic healing world), “journey” almost became a “scientific” term used by the experts. (If for nothing else than to connote a positive outcome/accomplishment/destination of the experience.) I think there are a lot of topics out there that this could touch. Or, perhaps, it could be nothing more than an interesting question added to your interview.

    Thanks for the educainment.🙂

    Like

  54. I think that it is important to point out that Martin Polanco is not a degreed medical doctor and therefore it is not accurate or appropriate to put the letters “MD” after his name. This is particularly important since conventional wisdom about best practices is that a medical professional (MD, nurse, or EMT, typically) is present during ibogaine treatments for drug addiction, and that an MD should be on call during the treatments in case the patient’s life becomes endangered. I am pretty sure that Martin Polanco does typically have trained medical staff on hand during treatments, and that there is typically an MD on call for emergencies. However, he does not have a medical degree.

    Like

    • This is untrue and slanderous. I am a licensed medical doctor and have my degree in medicine. These comments are posted by competition to damage our reputation and boost theirs. Sadly anybody can post anything on the internet with no accountability. Why does the person posting choose to remain anonymous? Here is a link with my diploma/degree.

      Like

      • I am curious as to the affects of serious 3+ hours of purging… expelling acid= more alkaline body? the relationship between the gut and the brain… please help or link to some studies… thank you

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  55. I did Ibogaine 3 times. I like the stuff. It is a very strange trip. And the days after it are imo simply described as: No thinking, smiling happy. Absolute peace in the brain. Nerve believed that something can do that.

    But for the addiction i have to say, ibogaine just takes the craving and deletes trauma. After ibogain people with addiction have to change there lives, not going back into old behavior. You need professional help after it. I got my kratom addiction ended only with help after it.

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  56. As one who is interested in helping people attain optimal performance states of being for a wide range of activities ranging from sports and arts to eating and speaking, I am particularly interested in the similarities of the psychedelic experience and the so-called “zone” we have all found ourselves in at one time or another. Moving forward, I also believe that making this connection could be useful in facilitating the disassociation of the psychedelic experience’s many misunderstood qualities so more folks might benefit from the many upsides. The underlying goal of oopSee (our content platform for guiding users through real life training drills and learning games) is to promote heightened awareness, which begins with offering our users tools for displacing distractions via sensory observation. oopSee comes from the acronym OOPSE, which I developed to assist tennis players in my RPM-Tennis perspective. It stands for: Observing Our Present Sensory Experiences.

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  57. Probably Tim’s most revealing podcast. So thankful that you shared with us your journey as a truth seeker. I knew there was more to you and your work than what you have broadcast this far.

    Please do an interview with Graham Hancock, that would be just WOW.

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  58. Sorry, haven’t listened to the whole thing, the plug at the start is too funny. The concept for Trunk Club is neat, but why let other people define you? The irony of being slave to the fashion opinions of others and then going on about psychedelics is just too much. There are no rules in fashion just like art. Its about expressing the human soul not oppressing it with definitions made by others. The elite at the top pull those “rules” out of nowhere to inform and control the minds of consumers. Why be slave to their opinions about what looks good, what’s in, what’s attractive. Whats in is what you make it. What looks good is what looks good to you. What its about is expressing yourself, your feelings, your thoughts. Not those of the clothing manufacturers and designers. This is the great truth tough by all the psychedelic masters down through the ages.

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  59. Does anyone know of equally powerful alternatives to float tanks? They are awesome, but it’s not environmentally sustainable for 7 billion people to use 800-1200 pounds of salt for a personal float tank. I’m curious whether there’s an good substitute requiring a significantly smaller environmental footprint. Thanks!

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  60. Hello Tim and others,

    During the interview, Tim kept referring to the “pre-work” needed to successfully reap the benefits of these experiences. Does anyone know what he is talking about?

    Thanks! I really appreciate the time and effort by everyone to continually search for improvements to life.

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  61. Tim, Will you or have you ever talked at length about your experiences using these drugs as therapy? Or even what was the catalyst that drove the need or desire to want to do this type of introspection?

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  62. Tim,
    You commented in an interview on psychedelics that Bill Wilson, one of the founders of AA, had used LSD to get sober. I do not believe this is quite correct. Bill W got sober in 1935, and was involved with a group popular at the time called the Oxford Group. The OG had a set of steps designed to help followers in building a spiritual life. The AA 12 steps are close derivatives of the Oxford Group steps, and all 12 were firmly in place by 1939. As you know, Hoffman did not synthesize LSD until 1937, and it’s psychedelic effects were not known until 1943 (and the first commercially available formulation did not come out until 1947). In the 1950s, Bill W. did use LSD several times–during the early period of excitement about LSD–as there was early evidence that it helped alcoholics and addicts achieve sobriety. Based on his experiences with the drug he thought it was very promising, though he was 20+ years sober at the time. When LSD fell into disrepute a few years later (rightly or not), Bill W. severed his association with it, probably because a major goal of his was for AA to be widely accepted and non-controversial.
    Thanks for all your work, Tim!
    John Meyers
    Ridgefield, CT

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