Tim Ferriss Interviews Neil Strauss, 7x New York Times Bestselling Author, on the Creative Process

113 Comments

Did you enjoy this sample of creativeLIVE content?

If so, you’ll love my extended interview of author Neil Strauss on The Tim Ferriss Show podcast. Click below to stream or you can find it on iTunes (see #15):

Posted on: June 14, 2013.

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113 comments on “Tim Ferriss Interviews Neil Strauss, 7x New York Times Bestselling Author, on the Creative Process

  1. Some really interesting ideas.
    I particularly liked your idea of how some topics are more transferable from blog to book.

    Neil’s idea of the kindle’s e-ink missing the feel of a book I think may be true. However, I think one point which all the ebook sellers are missing is the power of the library. The ability to put your physical books onto a shelf and display them in your house is a huge point of the print books.
    If Amazon were to acquire Goodreads (they’ve tried with their own service but it’s not there yet) then they could simulate it. The question is if a virtual bookshelf can satisfy our need to show off our library.

    Anyway great talk!

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  2. Tim & Neil – HOLY shyt, f***ing AWESOME! Seriously, fellas, this was awesome! I am finishing my first book and it’s a monster!

    Your tips on getting shyt done when writing were the best I’ve ever heard. REALLY grateful and hope U guys crush this again down the road, on ANY QnA whether it be writing, lifestyle, etc.

    Neil – BTW, how often are you surfing? Have U tried SUP?

    Again, thank YOU BIG time, brothas!

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  3. Great interview, and well run from Tim’s side too. Asking great insightful questions is half the power…really glad you posted this!

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  4. Tim, it is great to hear you’re an artist. Because of you, and particularly the 4HWW, I am escaping my professional career and pursuing my true passion: Art. I hope you do not give up on this creative process and would love to hear if you have ever analyzed this creative process as much as you have with writing.

    Brent

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  5. I really like the video chats as a format, followed by a transcript or something to print out points. They are more entertaining, so keep up Random shows, creative excerpts, and the like. The only writing I do is songwriting, so the technical publishing stuff ….meh. But the storytelling idea is gold. Keep them coming!

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  6. My first introduction to Neil Strauss was 2-3 years ago on this blog when Tim wrote about Neil’s book Emergency and how it would make you like Jason Bourne.

    Promptly bought the book, devoured it, started my own “survival” journey, and subsequently started a blog to chronicle everything. 3 years later, my blog is alive and well because of you 2 dudes! (and a little Gary V :-)

    Love whenever I can see you guys together!

    p.s. Tim–it would be cool to see you in more video brother! I know writing is your love, but anytime I watch a video of yours, I find it hard to go back to written posts. Videos are where I feel like we’re getting the “realest” access…

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      • When you plan on doing your next videos, please be considerate to have it in English subtitle. I would appreciate if you incorporate or/and let other content producers (Creative Live) to do the same.

        YouTube and others are making it easy to captioning on top of crowdsourcing and outsourcing.

        Enable to subtitle would enable me to enjoy the content as your readers enjoy. I would like to appreciate the same access since I am deaf myself.

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  7. I like Neil’s articulation of the different audiences for drafts: 1st for yourself (use ‘tk’, put everything in), 2nd for the reader (remove anything that can be cut without breaking the book), 3rd for the hater (answer arguments directly within the manuscript to ‘hater proof’ the book).

    It would be awesome to get more information from Tim on how to ‘get an A-list book agent.’

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  8. It’s strange how so many people who have published a book don’t consider themselves writers. I’ve published a book yet feel the same.

    Also, I consider self-publishing almost impossible without Stickk.com. You need to force deadlines upon yourself if no one else will. Otherwise Parkinson’s Law comes into effect and you find the time allotted is your entire life so it just keeps getting pushed back until it never happens.

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  9. Cool interview, Tim! As a big fan of both you and Neil, this was awesome to watch. Looking forward to seeing you speak at the Ignite event in Oshawa, Ontario next week!

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  10. I’d like to hear more about your writers retreat, what the routine was, how much time did you spend talking or other activities vs. actual writing. Have you done anything else like that? With who?

    I also enjoy drunk writing.

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  11. Tips from a comedian & author:

    1. Write ten minutes right when you wake up — your brain’s filter is not “on” yet so (1) you’ll look back with pleasant surprise at what it outputs and (2) it trains your brain to be open to “writing mode” throughout the day. As Seinfeld says, “do not break the chain”: write daily, no excuses.

    2. Get very comfortable writing in Evernote note pads (I used to use BlackBerry, but it sucked at backing up), and write EVERY amusing/interesting thought that comes to your mind — you WILL forget it if you don’t write it down NOW.

    3. Like Neal said, say the ideas aloud in conversation. Also, post “one liners” or snippets on Facebook / Twitter and watch the responses. Don’t pander, but do check that you’re communicating what you intended. (“The meaning of your communication is the response you get.” – NLP)

    4. As Tim alluded to, writing is entertainment: If you’re writing comedy and you’re not laughing, you’re not doing your job.

    5. Use the “red pen”: Cut every word you can.

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