How to Create a Global Phenomenon for Less Than $10,000

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Here is my most recent keynote from the 2,000-person+ Le Web in Paris, which focused on how to catalyze a global phenomenon on a very limited budget. Topics include:

– How to sell “around the product” for more coverage.
– The three necessary types of media exposure.
– Real-world tipping points from the launch of The 4-Hour Workweek
– How to increase website conversion 80%.

It pulls from real case studies, including my own experience and tech start-ups I advise…

To advance slides on the presentation, just hover the mouse over the right-hand side of the displayed slide and click when a hand appears.

To embed the presentation in your own blog, find the embed code here.

Ferriss – Le Web 2

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Elsewhere on the web:
Get the New and Expanded 4-Hour Workweek with 50 new case studies and all-new tools and tricks.
Tim Ferriss on Twitter – real-time antics, and see the new launch techniques as they unfold beginning Monday, 12/14

Posted on: December 13, 2009.

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120 comments on “How to Create a Global Phenomenon for Less Than $10,000

  1. Already watched this when you put it on Posterous and it was definitely a great watch and overlapped nicely with your past talk about building a high traffic blog.

    And although I was a fan of the green in the blog design it’s a neat change to match the color scheme of the new book (still hoping I can get an ebook version down in Australia some how though).

    Like

  2. Tim,

    I’m curious if you ever read Unleashing The Ideavirus by Seth Godin and if it had any impact on your marketing plan and/or your strategy. The book had tremendous impact on the designing of my plan.

    This post comes with great timing to my own launch in January.

    Like

  3. Thanks for sharing Tim, it’s great to see the testing and data analysis behind your decision making with the 4HWW as well as some of your angel investing ventures.

    It’s amazing to see how being selective and being smart with the small things can lead to so much. Thanks again for taking the time to share the video!

    Like

  4. Outstanding. Shows that it’s now about how much money you have, but how good your strategies are.

    It makes me think about all the awesome things we can create with a small budget.

    Like

  5. Nice video Tim.

    Do you think the 4hrww could have worked as a digital ebook? I wonder if it would have been harder to build your fan base because of the negative perception the title has. A physical book makes it seem less ‘shady’.

    Good stuff, the Tucker Max anecdote at the end is right on.

    Like

  6. Tim,

    The presentation provides great insight into published content. Some aspects can be transfered into creating buzz around a product that is sold through a ‘muse’.

    The muse I operate has followed tips you gave suggested the past. After listening to your presentation I plan on using tools such as Crazy Egg, and tactics such as selectively limiting links.

    However, I have noticed from my Google analytics data, the sales conversions from Google PPC are a tiny fraction to those of when my product is mentioned in a blog.

    Given that my product is a “life-style design” product for iPhone users:
    -What is the equivalent for a “thought leader” if you are selling a niche product like mine?
    -What are some strategies to get blog writers to write about your product, muse, book, etc?

    Best,
    Vincent

    Like

  7. Pardon my lack of imagination, but how did you use the revelation that Germans like “Tim’s Favorites” and American’s don’t to help you market your book in Germany? I mean, did you put a big sticker proclaiming “Tim’s Favorite Book!!!” on the cover?

    Like

  8. Very interesting presentation. The concept of ‘choosing’ your thousand true fans is a really concept and after you said it I realized I was breaking on of the biggest fourhourworkweek commandments. I’ve just been working getting anyone and everyone to do podcasts with joint ventures etc when in reality I should take that time and invest it in a few select people that I really want to create relationships with.

    Creating one great connector is much more productive than doing 10 interviews with relative nobodies.

    Like

  9. @Pam I’m sure Tim didn’t hide his education it is a signifier of authority. But I think we can all becomse authorities in our own way.

    I wonder if there is anything we can do to encourage people to become True Fans. For example, think of collectors of card games like Pokemon, stamps, cars etc.

    A lot of people have a drive (it must tap into some innate human need for completion and resolution) to buy to finish a set. After a while to commitment and consistency principle kicks in; ‘I’ve been spending all this money collecting these XYZs, I must be a really like XYZ’.

    A little bit devious. I wonder in what other ways True Fans can be created?

    Like

  10. Euuh must stop sniffing glue while posting. Here it is again:

    @Pam I’m sure Tim didn’t hide his education. It is a signifier of authority. But I think we can all become authorities in our own way.

    I wonder if there is anything we can do to encourage people to become True Fans? For example, think of collectors of card games like Pokemon, stamps and cars etc.

    A lot of people have the drive (it must tap into some innate human need for completion and resolution) to to collect the set. After a while the commitment and consistency principle kicks in; ‘I’ve been spending all this money collecting these XYZs, I must really like XYZ’.

    A little bit devious. I wonder, in what other ways can True Fans can be created?

    Like