Deadline in Less Than 7 Hours – An Important Bribe (Plus: Happiness Research for Economic Crashes)

167 Comments


Take 10 seconds today to fill up your karmic bank account. (photo: woodleywonderworks)

Part 1 – The Favor and Bribe

This two-part post is interrelated, so I recommend you read both sections. If you take 10 seconds to do the first part, it should — based on the research — make you a happier person.

The first part is simple. I want to give ten of you $150. More on this a little later…

There are less than 7 hours left to help 100,000 public school students get $1.5 million dollars in much-needed funding for their educations. A single click here is all I ask of you, and I sweeten the pot with a bribe below…

First, from the woman who convinced me to put up this post:

Where you grow up shouldn’t determine the quality of the education you receive. To help level the playing field, I propose giving 100,000 children in low-income communities the books, technology, and other materials that they need for a proper education.

The non-profit Donorschoose (who appear on the dedication page of 4HWW) only need 3,000-4,000 more votes to reach first place and receive $1.5 million dollars from American Express. As few as 500 more votes could lock them in for $500,000 (that means each vote is worth $1,000).

Earn some serious good karma and use this as your moment of Zen today.

You can make a difference in 100,000 lives with the click of a button. Please take these three simple steps to move from spectator to player in creating the world you want:

1. Vote here. If you don’t have an American Express Card, please forward this post to a friend and ask them to vote on your behalf.

2. Update your Facebook status, blog, twitter, e-mail or IM your friends either of these URLs:

http://www.membersproject.com/project/view/V8EWJV
http://snipurl.com/3zbdi (Same URL shortened)

A short message like this should do the trick:

“One click here today can give 100,000 students $1.5 million for education. No joke and no exaggeration. Take a second and earn some karma!”

The Bribe

Just do the following no later than midnight EST tonight:

1) Leave a comment on this post and tell me how you spread the word on the Donorschoose voting.

For bonus points:

2) Describe in the same comment which teacher, class, or school project had the biggest impact on your life and why.

Prize 1: Next Monday, I and several judges will pick the the 10 best comment give each person a $150 gift certificate to Donorschoose. The staff at Donorschoose can pick projects for you, if you’d like, and you’ll receive handwritten thank-you notes and photographs from every classroom you help. How cool is that?!

Prize 2:
I will also invite the 10 winners to a private 30-60-minute call where you can ask me anything in the world that you like.

If you need some more solid reasons…

So why DonorsChoose?

Many non-profits sound great on paper and then fail in execution.

I’ve seen inside DonorsChoose, read their financials, and known the CEO for 15 years. They are streamlined like a Silicon Valley start-up, have helped more than 600,000 students with almost no resources, and they have superstars guiding them, including the Chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures, the founder of NetFlix, the co-founder of Yahoo, and Bill Bradley, among many others. Their corporate partners include Crate and Barrel and Yahoo. The Omidyar Foundation helped finance them. It goes on and on.

Why education?

Education is, after much research, what I believe has the greatest long-term potential to solve all of our problems: potable water, AIDS, malaria, racial discrimination, unfair trade agreements for developing countries, and all of the rest. DonorsChoose isn’t just about colored pencils — they’ve already directly helped in preventing teen pregnancies and getting future leaders out of low-income housing and on the path to college.

Adding people without adding the tools — education and confidence — can create more problems than it solves. Increased disease, famine, and war are just three examples. The US, for example, has no problem multiplying its population; it’s training those people to get along and build a better future that’s the challenge.

With $1.5 million, DonorsChoose can change the future of US education. I’ve seen them execute.

I don’t expect them to get everyone’s vote, but they get mine. Get involved and vote, whichever direction you go!

To reiterate:

Earn some serious good karma and use this as your moment of Zen today.

You can make a difference in tens of thousands of lives with the click of a button. Please take these three simple steps to move from spectator to player in creating the world you want:

1. Vote here. If you don’t have an American Express Card, please forward this post to a friend and ask them to vote on your behalf.

2. Update your Facebook status, blog, twitter, e-mail or IM your friends either of these URL:
http://www.membersproject.com/project/view/V8EWJV
http://snipurl.com/3zbdi (Same URL shortened)

A short message like this should do the trick:

“One click here today can give 100,000 students $1.5 million for education. No joke and no exaggeration. Take a second and earn some karma!”

Let us bring power to the people, but let us also recognize that power begins with one simple tool: education.

Arm the masses. Click here.

Part 2 – The Latest Happiness Research – How to Smile During an Economic Crash

Psychologist Martin Seligman came at “happiness” (a problematic term that nonetheless fascinates me) from an unusual source: he’d previously studied depression and learned helplessness.

I came across some of his latest findings — all scientifically verified — in the most recent issue of the Princeton Alumni Weekly:

There are three levels to happiness: pleasure, the delight you get from chocolate, fast cards, and sex; engagement, the feeling of “flow” you get when you’re doing something you’re good at; and meaning, the fulfillment you get from being engaged in an effort greater than yourself. Pleasure is ephemeral and contributes very little to real happiness… but meaningful engagement brings lasting contentment.

For classmates who are headed towards retirement, Seligman offers the following tip: “Material objects have almost no role in positive emotion. As you organize your retirement, spend it on meaningful engagement. Don’t squander your savings on boats and houses.”

It’s pretty simple, actually. Figure out what you’re good at. And then apply your strengths to a greater purpose. And don’t forget to cultivate optimism along the way.

More coming on investment soon…

Posted on: October 13, 2008.

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167 comments on “Deadline in Less Than 7 Hours – An Important Bribe (Plus: Happiness Research for Economic Crashes)

  1. Hey Tim,
    Jet Set Life has got you covered. Updating my Facebook status as we speak and encouraging all our Jet Setters to do the same! Good luck and we’re all proud of you and the work your doing!

    Best,
    Rob and Kim

    Like

  2. Hi Tim, great cause, great initiative well executed as usual.

    I would have to acknowledge you as a great teacher and the lesson I believe most is to set unreasonable goals but plan small. Working hard to get that one right.

    However I don’t think that is what you are after.

    My greatest teacher was Mrs Newborn.

    Mrs Newborn taught us English and Drama, but she taught us all a lot about life.

    She taught us to step out and be vulnerable, no knocking, to cheer for others because it feels great when that happens for you. She taught us to honour creativity, that diversity was important, but above she taught us that life was a wonderful gift and how much you enjoyed depended on how much you lived it.

    No AMEX card but I did tweet your donor message.

    All the best, Dean.

    Like

  3. Hey there Tim! Another aspiring Four Hour-er here! The more I read your book the more I get amped up for the possibilities of finding my own muse and achieving my dreams! So, thanks a lot for your hard work and willingness to show others the way!

    I have retweeted on my own network, and attempted to have my sister Felicia Day (of The Guild internet series fame) raise awareness on her own blog and twitter feeds (no guarantees though!), which get much more visibility than my own! This is such a good charity. As I worked all the way through school, I know how hard it is to get a decent education when you don’t come from the most affluent roots.

    Although my degree itself was in Computer Science (UT Austin), I initially entered as a history major, completing my Senior Thesis on the Mongol Military system, before falling into the “You can’t make money with that crap” trap, and stumbling into an all-to-comfortable tech job.

    My Senior Thesis advisor, Dr. Lamphear, was and is an incredible man, and his guidance on my thesis was invaluable in showing me how to tap my inner creativity, work against deadlines, and from personal example, how to live a good life (as an Africanist, he was involved in many peace talks and political movements across Africa). Although he’s now retired from teaching, I do try and keep in touch with him from time to time.

    Cheers!

    Ryon D.

    Like

  4. Hey Tim!

    Decided that this was too good an offer (to help and be helped) to pass up. My Facebook status has been updated (visible to over 1900 individuals) and I tweeted about it (visible to much less). There’s also a Facebook note in the works…

    As for the teacher that most impacted my life, I’ve got far too many to mention (my life’s gone down a number of different paths already, and I’m only 20). The one who most influenced the path I’m on now, though, is Charlie Keil, my first-year Cinema Studies professor. I joined the class on the recommendation of a friend, hoping to add “watching movies, especially film noir” to my otherwise more typical-Psychology-student life at U of T. But this prof was incredible — energetic, passionate, motivated (and motivating) — he led me to see films in a different light. He’s the only professor I’ve actually cared to reach out to during my three years at U of T, and I’m deeply thankful for how he opened my eyes to a “brand new” art form (which, ironically, has been a part of my life since before my earliest memories).

    Good luck, Donors Choose!

    Like

  5. Done. Tweeted to all my friends.
    Educations biggest impact on my life: College.
    It didn’t necessarily change my thinking academically or instill me with life changing knowledge. But the environment of free thinking and socializing with people that were interested in learning fundamentally changed me.

    Questions were answered and answers were questioned.

    It was beautiful to see the flow of information not be bottlenecked by closed mindedness. Everyone should have the opportunity to learn in that kind of environment.
    Everyone should be able to ask the question: Why?
    Everyone should have access to the world’s knowledge.

    Like

  6. Tim,
    I have been a strong believer in Donorschoose and while i am not a cardmember because I am a poor starving student who has stayed debt free, I do have several friends who read my blog and should GOTV for donorschoose. I also updated my facebook status with the Karma line and have had two friends already comment and vote on it.

    Sincerely,
    David Baker

    Like

  7. Hi Tim!
    This is a good initiative, I didn`t see it before now!!!
    We don`t have American Express cards here in Norway.
    Still, I will do EVERYTHING I can in making a viral impact on this, it seems very likely to be meeting these goals by doing an Effort!
    I will push this forward to all the people i met at FoWA past week as well as social medias, hope it makes a difference!

    By the way, the “Future of web apps” event hosted by Carsonified in London the past Week was Amazing! and heavy on startups. But still i thought it Lacked your presence / T4HWW mentality presented on stage with an important message to all the startups. Don`t get me wrong, the speakers were excellent as well as the event…just missing some elements.

    We`ll see you there next time right? :)

    Best wishes.
    Bendik L.

    Like

  8. Tim, I am amazed in the differences in quality of public edu. available even in the small town where I live. I sure hope this word gets out. I updated my twitter status (which updates my facebook status) Great. Idea!

    One teacher, Mrs Geary, in my High School changed my life through her encouragement and belief in my talents as an artist. I would not be who I am today without her impact on my life.

    John

    twitter account http://www.twitter.com/johnflurry

    Like

  9. Hi Tim,
    I had already voted in the American Express Member Project, and this post persuaded me to change my vote (I previously agonized over which of the final 5 would provide the greatest and longest lasting benefit). I agree with you that education may be the best way to permanently change the course of the future for the better, and I have passed the word on to all of my friends.

    The single greatest impact that education has had in my own life has been the guitar lessons that my grandmother paid for when I was young. It could have very easily been a passing fancy for me, but she always believed in my ability. To this day, it continues to be a source of spiritual strength, creative exchange, and an instrument of social change for me.

    Like

  10. I have added the link to both my business and personal Twitter account, as well as my Facebook and Myspace profiles.

    I would have to say the teacher that has impacted me the most was a college professor of Media Philosophy at RIT named John A. Ciampa. Quite often, the lecture would take place with the 10 or so students (very low enrollment for the class) walking through the woods, or over a beer or two at a local bar. The class would begin with a question, and John would allow the students to debate back and forth what the best resolution would be. Answers were generally never wrong, because the best answer may come from two or three off the wall ideas. John would only chime in when he thought the discussion was moving too far from the central theme. At the end of class, he would neatly sum up what we discussed, and then give his opinion on what he thought the best answer to the question would be.

    I believe John impacted me most by showing that answers are never concrete. What may have worked in the past may not work at this point in time, or in the future. Fluidity must be accepted in thought and decision at all times. A very hard lesson to teach, and one I have to constantly remind myself of.

    Like

  11. Hi Tim,

    Done, done, and done. Glad to help out! I voted on the Amex site as well as updated my LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter profiles, that’s notice to somewhere around 900 or so people. . .yeah!

    Biggest educational impact of my life? Well, there are two actually. . .and since you didn’t specifically say which “single” experience, and neither were my teachers, I’m gonna run with it. . .both play into one another, though as you’ll see. . .

    The first impactful event took place when I was a freshman at Southern Illinois University. For whatever reason, a number of us freshman were crammed in the basement of our dining hall to hear a few folks give us the low-down on what life was going to be like in our new home of Carbondale, Illinois. Several people spoke that day. . .but I remember only one.

    He was a tall, and powerful lookin’ guy. . .someone you knew you wouldn’t want to mess with. . .and someone who looked even more menacing from my seated position on the floor, kinking my neck to get a good look at this man that was well over 6 feet tall. He was also wearing a suit — when we were all mostly clad in shorts due to the August heat in Carbondale — he was definitely a “presence”.

    I don’t recall his whole talk, but one aspect of a story he relayed to us changed my life forever. He mentioned that when he was a student himself some decades earlier, he got a bit sidetracked at one point, had a bit too much fun, and found himself on the opposing end of the university’s Registrar. In other words, he was asked to leave school for awhile to sort things out. . .

    . . .and yet while this disappointment was embarrassing, and no doubt, a blow to his ego, it gave him the greater resolve to come back and finish his education. And he did just that. He finished. AND, he finished with Dean’s list honors on top of it.

    However, despite this achievement, that’s not really the highlight. Nope. The highlight is that this towering gentleman many years my senior, decked out to the hills, and noticeable successful, was now an administrator at the same school that asked him to leave many years earlier. Wow, talk about a turn of events.

    Now, I can’t remember exactly his position, but my fuzzy memory has always put him near the top. . .a board member. . .or someone in the President’s office. . .something like that. I can’t recall exactly, but he was. . .SOMEONE. . .and he was telling us to never give up. To never surrender our dreams, and to never let anyone else tell us we cannot accomplish something we set out to accomplish.

    It was one of the most amazing lessons I ever learned, and I really wish I knew the name of this gentleman so I could thank him for influencing my life in the way he did.

    The irony, and second part of this story, is that when I too faced this same problem, not too many years after that little lecture in the basement of our dining hall, I remembered his words, and they stuck with me. So when I met with my adviser on my way out the proverbial door of the university, she turned to me at one point and said directly: “I don’t think you’ll be back”. I have never forgotten those words, and I THANK her every day of my life for saying them to me.

    I’m not sure whether she really thought I wouldn’t be back, or whether she was trying to light a fire under my rear, but I saw it as a spark and it ignited in me the wake-up call I needed to turn things around.

    So when I did get that chance to redeem myself not long after that fateful meeting, I too performed much better, graduated, and later went on to get a second degree (go figure) from the University of Minnesota where I scored a number of Dean’s list recognitions of my own and. . .GET THIS. . .even went on to become an academic adviser, sharing with panicked students also in the last weeks of their tenure as official students and soon-to-be “probationers” my story about what really matters: dusting yourself off and getting back on the horse.

    I loved sharing that lesson in humility with students, and now (gulp!) many more, and it made me as their adviser much more human as a result.

    Even the great Michael Jordan has acknowledged that without failing he could never succeed in the way he does. What a great lesson.

    Good luck with the attention-getting fund drive!

    Cheers,
    Doc

    Like

  12. Hey Tim!

    Updated my Facebook and Twitter accounts. This is a great project, I hope it wins!

    Mr. Malone was the one teacher that stands above the rest. He was my first teacher in America at Jupiter Elementary School. He helped me with my english and overall confidence. I will always be thankful for the great job that he did.

    Best,

    Janis

    P.S. After reading your book, I was inspired to start Elementz Nutrition, I look forward to sending you some product! We’re launching in January.

    Like

  13. First, this is an awesome project! My mother is a completely creative public school teacher and she has spent so much of her income to make learning interesting. Can you believe the only supplies she was given one year was 1000 sheets of copy paper!

    I posted this on my facebook status, because word of mouth from a person you trust is always the best way to get people to take something seriously. I live in the south where this still works:)

    I have had a number of amazing learning experiences but one of the best was in the class of Robert Gallagher. He changed the way I thought about how a class could be taught. I think he had ADD and he had to sustain his interest which sustained ours. First. he never lectured for more that 10 minutes and he let you know exactly how long he would so we could concentrate on his efficient lecturing style. Second. He made us apply everything we learned in the lecture immediately through group work. It could be a discussion, it could be artistic, dramatic, pretty much any way to make us meditate on the ideas. Third. He put every worksheet or reading we were going to need for the entire class in one book. What a fantastic idea because he and we always had everything we would ever need for any activity with us–super efficient. Third. We were always rewarded with a party. Even if it is 10 minutes in 50 you will work really hard for 50 minutes for 10 minutes of fun!

    Like

  14. I clicked, I contacted my colleagues (who all carry firm sponsored AMEX cards) and asked them to spread the word. Even a small % take-up of a 60,000+ firm should make a difference.

    Like

  15. Hi Tim!

    Thanks for posting that – I updated my facebook status, tweeted all my friends and sent an email round, all of us Sydney-siders are just waking up : )

    Hmm the teacher who influenced my life the most is not a college professor nor was she probably a certified teacher, but she made such a massive impact I will never forget it.

    My family and I ran away from Russia during the fall of the soviet union in 1991, I was about 5 and did not speak a word of English when we landed in NYC. The first school I went to was a tiny brick mess of a school in Brooklyn, there an elderly teacher/aid took me under her wing.

    While all of my designated teachers where mean and frustrated by me smiling and nodding at everything they said, she would sit with me in an empty classroom for hours teaching me English and comforting me. She also sparked an intense love of reading and writing in me that has never left to this day! Though I left the school after 3 years I will never ever forget her.

    Everybody deserves to have a teachers like her – somebody who believes and supports you no matter what, and no matter the resources or the frustration doesn’t give up on you.

    I hope this project wins, no child should ever be denied knowledge and resources.

    G

    Like

  16. Thanks for spreading the word about this Tim. What a great cause. For my part, I tweeted and encouraged people to vote. If you pick me to win the $150, please donate it to a underprivileged private school near you, so they can share some of the benefit too. Thanks!

    Like

  17. Hey Tim, would need to acknowledge you as a great teacher. The best lesson would be to choose unreasonable goals and plan small.

    Mrs Newborn was my best teacher.

    She taught us English and Drama, but she also taught us to step out and be vulnerable, to value the contribution of others (no knocking), to cheer for others because it lifted people up. But above all she taught us that life was a gift and enjoying it required declaring yourself in and going for it.

    Don’t have an AMEX card but did tweet yr request @eco2oh

    Great cause, great initiative and as usual excellent execution.

    Dean

    Like

  18. Tim,

    Great post today. This is my first time commenting on your blog, but I’ve been reading your blog (and book) for about a year or so.

    Is there any way for me to read the entirety of the article you quote in part 2 of your post today?

    Like

  19. Hi Tim.

    Thanks for putting out the call to action! What a great way to really get the word out for a very necessary cause. I have updated my Facebook status, wrote a note and put it on Twitter. Then I asked everyone to pass it on.

    I really believe in education and wish that more people would make it a priority because funding America’s education today means a better future for EVERYONE!

    I had an amazing teacher who started me out right in 1st and 2nd grade – Mrs. S. When people comment on something as simple as my handwriting, I give her all of the credit. She taught me that I could do anything and I still believe that today.

    I later had a phenomenal experience in high school that stays with me to this day. It was a high school volunteer trip to Mexico that enabled us to go and build 2 homes for 2 families there. What a huge honor it was to provide homes for these families. That experience really just expanded my heart on a global scale.

    And finally, I just recently started volunteering once a week in a underprivileged neighborhood school to help those children who struggle to meet grade level of children their same age. I have been able to arrange my time and schedule to allow me to take time to do something to make a difference for someone else.

    So I’ve had amazing teachers and experiences in schools, now it’s my turn to give back to them.

    THANKS AGAIN TIM!

    Like

  20. Charles here from DonorsChoose.org, just wanting to thank each of you for taking a moment to vote for “Help 100,000 Children Thrive in the Classroom.” As soon as Tim published this post and you accepted his call to action, we moved a lot closer to grabbing a huge chunk of AmEx funding. 100% of those funds will go to classroom requests in low-income communities, requests that have been posted by our most dedicated public school teachers–the kind profiled by you!

    Thank you again for coming to the aid of students in need!
    -Charles Best
    Founder & CEO
    DonorsChoose.org

    Like

  21. Hi Tim.

    Thanks for putting out the call to action! What a great way to really get the word out for

    a very necessary cause. I have updated my Facebook status, wrote a note and put it on

    Twitter. Then I asked everyone to pass it on.

    I really believe in education and wish that more people would make it a priority because

    funding America’s education today means a better future for EVERYONE!

    I had an amazing teacher who started me out right in 1st and 2nd grade – Mrs. S. When

    people comment on something as simple as my handwriting, I give her all of the credit. She

    taught me that I could do anything and I still believe that today.

    I later had a phenomenal experience in high school that stays with me to this day. It was a

    high school volunteer trip to Mexico that enabled us to go and build 2 homes for 2 families

    there. What a huge honor it was to provide homes for these families. That experience

    really just expanded my heart on a global scale.

    And finally, I just recently started volunteering once a week in a underprivileged

    neighborhood school to help those children who struggle to meet grade level of children

    their same age. I have been able to arrange my time and schedule to allow me to take time

    to do something to make a difference for someone else.

    So I’ve had amazing teachers and experiences in schools, now it’s my turn to give back to

    them.

    THANKS AGAIN TIM!

    Like

  22. Hey Tim,

    Ok, so I posted the note and URL in my Facebook update, tweeted about it, put it in a forum post on MocoSpace (a mobile social network), put it in my status on Gmail so anyone in my network who is logged in will see it, and I did an old-fashioned email blast to my friends who tolerate that sort of thing.

    As far as my most influential teachers, I’d have to say my parents and I mean that literally. Before retiring both my parents were educators and at one time I had both of them as teachers in elementary school. Both gave me a love of learning that has served me very well over the years. My mother is a product of the 60’s so I also learned from her to care about what’s going on in the world at large and to resist the nonsense that’s going on here.

    Cheers,
    Ben

    Like

  23. Voted!

    Updated Facebook and Twitter!

    I had a number of incredible teachers growing up. Surprising considering I grew up in a town of 4k. The most influential and amazing of my teachers turned out to be my high school music teacher and choir director (due to the size of the school system, she taught music to both Jr. High and High School, and even grade school for awhile), Roz Strange (pronounced “Strang”). She could make the most rigorous of vocal exercises interesting or fun. She taught us the “why” behind the methods we use to create the sounds we did (good and bad). She wasn’t afraid to make mistakes, and assured us the same was ok of us as well.

    She took what kids she could (there were no try-outs) and transformed us into something amazing conquering Handel’s “Messiah” (Hallelujah Chorus).

    “Everyone can sing”, she’d say.

    I still think of her when I sing these days, even when it’s just to sing my little girl to sleep.

    Like

  24. Hello Tim,

    Thanks for the reminder…. I saw it a couple weeks ago from a teacher friend of mine in Queens, NY and just posted it to my facebook.

    Also, my dad is a site supervisor on construction projects. He just had open-heart surgery on Thursday and won’t be working for a while. I sent him your book. He’ll have time to read it, and hopefully he’ll be able to create a healthy, enjoyable life.

    Hugs

    Erin

    Like

  25. I tweeted, voted with my AmEx card, Dugg it, posted about it on a popular forum, emailed it, and signed up for Stutter and Stutter’d it.

    I absolutely love causes that have to do with education. Just like Tim said, education is the answer to every other problem.

    Interestingly, I don’t have a favorite teacher/class/school project – and that’s one reason I’m so passionate about this cause. I always did well in school, but I did well because I’m naturally competitive – not because I was ever motivated by a teacher.

    One of my good friends and I got to talking and somehow the subject of science came up. I told him I never cared much for science, and he said if I’d learned it “the right way” I’d love it. I asked him what he meant, and he told me about a friend he has who runs her own charter school.

    His friend hired an expert to come in one day and give an exciting day-long science lesson on many scientific fundamentals. The expert did it in a fun way, and people could leave the course answering questions such as “What methodology do scientists use to answer questions?” or “How can I prove theories and equations that up until now I’ve only memorized?”

    The class was set up to be FUN. It was set to make students understand – deeply and profoundly- what goes on underneath those formulas and equations that other students have to memorize and spit out.

    Even though the course was given to 6th and 7th graders, Chad told me I should get a copy of the DVDs that this particular man sells because I’d be able to get just as much out of them as he did (and he’s a very intelligent 31 year old).

    Now, Chad and I are not necessarily typical people – we’re constantly reading and trying to learn more. But what about the “average” adult? (I’ve read statistics saying that over 40% of adults don’t pick up another book once they leave college – I know how statistical validity goes, so I’m also basing this on my own personal experience – it seems to be accurate.)

    THIS is why I’m so passionate about education. I mean, think about it. These 6th and 7th graders were given ONE COURSE that forever changed the way they see the world. They look at television screens and understand how images come up. They really understand what happened when an apple fell on Newton’s head. You learn things like that and you can’t possibly see the world the same as you did before. This one day… one course… altered the lives of this woman’s students forever. It’s HUGE!

    I was going through DonorsChoose and looking at some of the projects, and I was blown away by how plain awesome the teachers were. One particular one that I had to donate to was one in which the teacher wanted to buy visual flash cards for her students because she discovered how well they retained information by using them. I just read a book on superlearning which confirmed that our subconscious filters everything via visuals, and I thought it was SO GREAT that this teacher made that realization and felt it important to bring it to her students.

    That’s the kind of stuff I’m talking about – it’s teachers like that who alter people’s lives permanently. This post has gotten so long that I won’t start to get into the benefits of how phenomenal education is for less privileged people – but MAN… this is just such a freaking awesome cause, I love it!

    Like

  26. I tweeted (and got friends to tweet), voted with my AmEx card, Dugg it, posted about it on a popular forum, emailed it, and signed up for Stutter and Stutter’d it.

    I absolutely love causes that have to do with education. Just like Tim said, education is the answer to every other problem.

    Interestingly, I don’t have a favorite teacher/class/school project – and that’s one reason I’m so passionate about this cause. I always did well in school, but I did well because I’m naturally competitive – not because I was ever motivated by a teacher.

    One of my good friends and I got to talking and somehow the subject of science came up. I told him I never cared much for science, and he said if I’d learned it “the right way” I’d love it. I asked him what he meant, and he told me about a friend he has who runs her own charter school.

    His friend hired an expert to come in one day and give an exciting day-long science lesson on many scientific fundamentals. The expert did it in a fun way, and people could leave the course answering questions such as “What methodology do scientists use to answer questions?” or “How can I prove theories and equations that up until now I’ve only memorized?”

    The class was set up to be FUN. It was set to make students understand – deeply and profoundly- what goes on underneath those formulas and equations that other students have to memorize and spit out.

    Even though the course was given to 6th and 7th graders, Chad told me I should get a copy of the DVDs that this particular man sells because I’d be able to get just as much out of them as he did (and he’s a very intelligent 31 year old).

    Now, Chad and I are not necessarily typical people – we’re constantly reading and trying to learn more. But what about the “average” adult? (I’ve read statistics saying that over 40% of adults don’t pick up another book once they leave college – I know how statistical validity goes, so I’m also basing this on my own personal experience – it seems to be accurate.)

    THIS is why I’m so passionate about education. I mean, think about it. These 6th and 7th graders were given ONE COURSE that forever changed the way they see the world. They look at television screens and understand how images come up. They really understand what happened when an apple fell on Newton’s head. You learn things like that and you can’t possibly see the world the same as you did before. This one day… one course… altered the lives of this woman’s students forever. It’s HUGE!

    I was going through DonorsChoose and looking at some of the projects, and I was blown away by how plain awesome the teachers were. One particular one that I had to donate to was one in which the teacher wanted to buy visual flash cards for her students because she discovered how well they retained information by using them. I just read a book on superlearning which confirmed that our subconscious filters everything via visuals, and I thought it was SO GREAT that this teacher made that realization and felt it important to bring it to her students.

    That’s the kind of stuff I’m talking about – it’s teachers like that who alter people’s lives permanently. This post has gotten so long that I won’t start to get into the benefits of how phenomenal education is for less privileged people – but MAN… this is just such a freaking awesome cause, I love it!

    Like

  27. Tim, your blog is quickly becoming a source of stuff I always want to forward to everyone I know! (Oh no I don’t want to be thought of as one of those spammers! But your stuff is always so important I just HAVE to share it!)

    Unfortunately, I’m not an AMEX owner, but I Dugg and Stumbled this, added your recommended message to my Twitter, Facebook, and Myspace status messages, and even wrote a personal email to about a dozen family and biz colleagues.

    The teacher who has been most influential on my life was my high school French professor, Alec Hodgins. I was in his classes 3 out of 4 years and became pretty close. His teaching helped give me an appreciation for a foreign culture that much of our country is afraid of for some reason. He was an early source of great world music, literature, and life philosophy, and also provided a great deal of travel inspiration for me, just as you have. I was lucky enough to have my first trip abroad on one of his class trips—spending a week with a host family in Cannes and a few days in Paris with classmates. The travel seed was sown! My interest in Thailand was first stoked when he shared about his experience taking his family there for an extended vacation. That interest was reinforced by your advice about geo-arbitrage, the positive experiences of dozens of other friends, and now I’m making it real and going to live abroad in Southeast Asia for the year ahead!

    Like

  28. Tim, your blog is quickly becoming a source of stuff I always want to forward to everyone I know! (Oh no I don’t want to be thought of as one of those spammers! But your stuff is always so important I just HAVE to share it!)

    Unfortunately, I’m not an AMEX owner, but I Dugg and Stumbled this, added your recommended message to my Twitter, Facebook, and Myspace status messages, and even wrote a personal email to about a dozen family and biz colleagues.

    The teacher who has been most influential on my life was my high school French professor, Alec Hodgins. I was in his classes 3 out of 4 years and became pretty close. His teaching helped give me an appreciation for a foreign culture that much of our country is afraid of for some reason. He was an early source of great world music, literature, and life philosophy, and also provided a great deal of travel inspiration for me, just as you have. I was lucky enough to have my first trip abroad on one of his class trips—spending a week with a host family in Cannes and a few days in Paris with classmates. The travel seed was sown! My interest in Thailand was first stoked when he shared about his experience taking his family there for an extended vacation. That interest was reinforced by your advice about geo-arbitrage, the positive experiences of dozens of other friends, and now I’m making it real and going to live abroad in Southeast Asia for the year ahead!

    Like

  29. Hi Tim,

    Done! Voted, Tweeted, and Facebooked.

    Thanks for bringing this cause to the attention of your enlightened readership.

    The class that was most inspiring for me came after college. I had the opportunity to teach English at a small rural university in the mountains of Haiti… but truth be told, I was woefully unprepared!

    Rather than give up on me… my students helped me improve my Creole, so we could better converse and learn together.

    Through a year of teaching, I had only one student absent from one class. Students were up studying by candlelight before dawn to cram for finals… just like in the US I guess, with less Dr. Pepper and pizza.

    I’m now on a “mini retirement” in Rio… look forward to comparing notes soon.

    Take care,
    Brian

    Like

  30. Hey Tim, thanks for the post–I updated my Facebook status. It’s amazing how many good deeds require just a tiny bit more effort than doing nothing!

    By far, my most inspirational teacher was Mr. Whitney in 6th grade. I have to credit a good friend I met in class for introducing me to electronics and computers, but Mr. Whitney, when he learned of our interest, gave us almost free rein to follow our passion. This was the “old days”, so we learned morse code and got our amateur radio licenses at age 12, built a little single-board computer, experimented, blew out a lot of LEDs and transistors, and sealed our fate as “makers” for life.

    Mr. Whitney showed a willingness to bend the rules and ignore the small issues for the greater good. I hope there are some teachers these days who are allowed to do the same.

    Like

  31. Hi Tim,

    Long time fan of the 4HWW. I’m continually impressed by how effectively you use your high profile on the web to impact important causes. Let’s get this done.

    I signed up on AMEX as a guest, and blasted facebook and twitter to try to get the vote out.

    Here’s my thoughts on my education:

    Sure, it’s a cliche, but education truly is a lifelong journey. The lessons that I learned from high school teachers almost ten years ago are increasingly clear (and applicable!) as I encounter new experiences and obstacles. I can’t remember a single thing about biology, but my 10th grade science teacher taught me a ton about the right way to conduct myself in the world.

    A teacher’s impact isn’t in the material that he or she presents; instead, they act as an incubator for ideas, morals, etc. Aside from (and in concert with) your parents, teachers are the main influence in a young person’s life. Even when you take into account how our crazy society awards risk rather than honest hard work and dedication, it’s still ridiculous that teachers make so little. Not to get into politics, but hopefully that’s something that will change in the next administration.

    Like

  32. Timbo-
    1. got the link up on my Facebook, as well as a blog post on my blog, see the latest here:
    http://archipreneur.blogspot.com

    2. the teacher who had the most impact on me was a high school PE teacher. She was also the gymnastics teacher. I was a fat kid and she talked me into joining the team, after which I promptly lost ~40 lbs in a few months, became lean, and in return my confidence gre strong, and I’ve been able to accomplish the things I’ve wanted to, have the balls to meet and network with people, and try things I normally wouldn’t. She gave me the fuel to light my ‘life fire’, and I’ve lived MUCH better since.

    I’d also benefit greatly from a 30-60 minute phone call with you. I’ve purchased your book twice and given them both away to friends I would think it would benefit.

    Like

  33. Hi Tim,
    Your challenge prodded me to take action where otherwise I wouldn’t have. So I thank you for that. I just sent an email to 35 of my biggest spheres of influence asking them to vote. I shared my passion for education and how easy it is to make a world of a difference. I posted the link on Facebook and added it to my Facebook status.

    Father Malo. Yes, he was a priest. As an incoming freshman to my Catholic high school, Father Malo greeted me with a huge smile and an exuberant personality. His class soon became the favorite part of an otherwise painful freshman year. What truly separated this jovial, middle aged celibate priest apart from my other teachers occured during one 10 minute “lesson”. I remember it vividly to this day. He called on a student in the class and had him sit on a stool in the front of the room. Out of nowhere, Father Malo began to call him names, bully him, and physicall abuse him. Me and my classmates sat there while tears beginning to role down the student’s face. No one in the class knew what was going on. My love towards my teacher were being twisted…I didn’t know what to do, feel, or what the heck was happening. I looked around the class to see what others did as Father Malo called him every bad name in the book. And then my teacher spit on this classmates face. I wanted to melt in my seat out of fear…what should I do, I thought? Then Father Malo turned around to witness a group of shocked faces and told the class that this will be a common scene in high school. He explained that we need to stand up for those who cannot defend themselves. He said that we cannot let bad things happen in front of us, such as what had just occured. In that 5 minute lesson, he taught me more about honor and justice than I have ever experienced thereafter. Father Malo was an example of bravery, passion, and intensity. I still look back on that moment and admire him for his intense desire to teach us, despite breaking every rule in the book. He was a maverick and a leader. He led by example and through experience. I love him for that and will never forget him.

    Like

  34. Timbo-
    1. got the link up on my Facebook, as well as a blog post on my blog, see the my website link.

    2. the teacher who had the most impact on me was a high school PE teacher. She was also the gymnastics teacher. I was a fat kid and she talked me into joining the team, after which I promptly lost ~40 lbs in a few months, became lean, and in return my confidence grew strong and I’ve been able to accomplish the things I’ve wanted to, have the balls to meet and network with people, and try things I normally wouldn’t. She gave me the fuel to light my ‘life fire’, and I’ve lived MUCH better since.

    I’d also benefit greatly from a 30-60 minute phone call with you. I’ve purchased your book twice and given them both away to friends I would think it would benefit.

    Like

  35. Done. Tweeted, seeded all over Facebook via status and personal messages, text-messaged, emailed, and even got a friend to post a noticeable announcement on his site (www.enterandexcel.com – mine’s a work in progress at the moment). So glad to be able to help make greater opportunities available to kids!

    My best teacher was my piano teacher. When I was much younger, my parents worried that I wasn’t practicing the assigned pieces enough. When they asked her about it, she just asked, “Is he playing?” “Well, yeah – he plays all the time.” “Then it’s fine. The important thing is that he’s playing.”
    I didn’t find out about that until I was in college, but it was still one of the most profound lessons I have ever been taught – that I don’t have to follow the pack, that it’s okay to find my own way. She taught me to find what is unique to me. As a result, I have performed in such varied places as Milan, Glasgow, Mexico, Los Angeles, and New York. I thank her to this day.

    Like

  36. Done. Tweeted, on Facebook via status and messages, sms-ed, emailed, and even got a friend to post a noticeable announcement on his site (www.enterandexcel.com – mine’s a work in progress at the moment). So glad to be able to help make greater opportunities available to kids!

    My best teacher was my piano teacher. When I was much younger, my parents worried that I wasn’t practicing the assigned pieces enough. When they asked her about it, she just asked, “Is he playing?” “Well, yeah – he plays all the time.” “Then it’s fine. The important thing is that he’s playing.”
    I didn’t find out about that until I was in college, but it was still one of the most profound lessons I have ever been taught – that I don’t have to follow the pack, that it’s okay to find my own way. She taught me to do what I love & find what is unique to me. As a result, I have performed in such varied places as Milan, Glasgow, Mexico, Los Angeles, and New York. I thank her to this day.

    Like

  37. Tim –

    Vote complete, and I’ve posted the link to my LinkedIn profile that has these statistics:

    Your trusted friends and colleagues – 673
    Two degrees away – 109,700+
    Three degrees away – 5,161,200+

    I would like to dedicate my vote to my high school business law teacher; Gene Longinetti. He was a true NR before his time. He had made millions in real estate (and continues to do so) and became a high school teacher to fulfill a passion he had to share his experiences. I will never forget rolling past the teacher’s parking lot full of beat up Oldsmobiles and Chevrolets and one bad ass Mercedes S-Class. I knew exactly who’s car that was. He wasn’t the 50 year old with a red BMW – he was using techniques of the NR to make coin in real estate while teaching us 16 year old brats. Those were the days of Bud Fox and Gordon Gekko – Mr. Longinetti didn’t need more yachts to water ski behind – he spent his time and energy enabling a new crop of successful students – I was lucky enough to be one of them.

    He not only taught us about the law – he taught us the importance of doing what you have a passion for and not wasting time doing work for work’s sake. He ran his classroom that way – I learned the ways of the NR in the 1980’s and have benefited ever since.

    Here’s to you, Mr Longinetti – I salute you.

    Rob C.

    Like

  38. Done. Tweeted, on Facebook via status and messages, sms-ed, emailed, recruited a Montessori teacher friend to help spread the word both in her classes & with the parents at her school, and even got a friend to post a noticeable announcement on his web site. So glad to be able to help make greater opportunities available to kids!

    My best teacher was my piano teacher. When I was much younger, my parents worried that I wasn’t practicing the assigned pieces enough. When they asked her about it, she just asked, “Is he playing?” “Well, yeah – he plays all the time.” “Then it’s fine. The important thing is that he’s playing.”
    I didn’t find out about that until I was in college, but it was still one of the most profound lessons I have ever been taught – that I don’t have to follow the pack, that it’s okay to find my own way. She taught me to do what I love & find what is unique to me. As a result, I have performed in such varied places as Milan, Glasgow, Mexico, Los Angeles, and New York. I thank her to this day.

    Like

  39. I am going to send this to all the people in my address book and posted it on my linkedin group…As well as call some people on the telephone as this is mission critical and time is short…I grew up in the projects in NYC and went to public school…if it were not for “Free” lunch I wouldn’t have eaten. If it were not for a caring Guidance Counselor who always went above and beyond many times I would not have been able to get home on public transportation. The Guidance Counselor also made sure I knew that I was talented and gifted and I had a great future ahead of me. As a result I graduated ranked #1 in my class of over 1000 students. I was also nominated for a United Federation of Teacher’s scholarship that helped fund my undergraduate college education at Dartmouth. I am eternally grateful for all the support and love and when you support this, you support other people just like me, talented and gifted whose lives will be forever changed. Thank you !

    Like

  40. Got it on Facebook via status and messages, Tweeted, SMS’d, emailed, recruited a Montessori teacher friend to help spread the word both in her classes and with the parents at her school, and even got a friend to post a noticeable announcement on his web site. So glad to be able to help make greater opportunities available to kids!

    My best teacher was my piano teacher. When I was much younger, my parents worried that I wasn’t practicing the assigned pieces enough. When they asked her about it, she just asked, “Is he playing?” “Well, yeah – he plays all the time.” “Then it’s fine. The important thing is that he’s playing.”
    I didn’t find out about that until I was in college, but it was still one of the most profound lessons I have ever been taught – that I don’t have to follow the pack, that it’s okay to find my own way. She taught me to do what I love & find what is unique to me. As a result, I have performed in such varied places as Milan, Glasgow, Mexico, Los Angeles, and New York. I thank her to this day.

    Like

  41. No Amex so no vote from me, but I Tweeted so a few more folks should get the message.

    My favorite teacher… that’s a tough one. I’d have to say the one I haven’t met yet because I’m not prepared enough. I’m just trying to learn this life’s lessons so I don’t have to repeat any.

    Like

  42. Great post, Tim. Thanks.

    MySpace Blogged:
    http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog&Mytoken=C1F04C3B-1FAD-4525-85BE39474F85557174330033

    FaceBook Updates:
    http://profile.to/chucklasker/

    Twitter:
    http://twitter.com/chucklasker

    LinkedIn “What are you doing now” update:
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/doubleplus

    Teacher Story: My first grade teacher, Mrs. Massaro, and I did not get along. It was a miserable year. To my shock on entering my first day of second grade, Mrs. Massaro was my teacher. Before I could scream and cry, she explained that she changed grades just to be my teacher again so she could figure out how to get along better. We ended up great friends and she inspired me to see school as valuable. She passed away a few years ago, but her teachings are a part of who I am and always will be.

    Like

  43. Hey Tim-

    Did the usual facebook, myspace, etc. Also sent a mass email out to family members seeing as they are the most affluent people I know and the ones most likely to carry an AMEX card.

    I am currently an ESL teacher in Taiwan, and this has inspired me to challenge some of my adult students to participate in this project. Although many people in Asia don’t use credit cards, I believe it will start an interesting dialogue about education in the world. Thanks for spreading the word!

    Like

  44. 1) I have publicized the voting via links in my twitter status & facebook status.

    2) Entrepreneurship teacher. He provided a coherent framework of what Web 2.0 was and is. He inspired me to actually start a startup–and I’m absolutely glad I did. I’ll never be the same again.

    Like

  45. Hey Tim-

    Did the usual facebook, myspace, etc. Also sent a mass email out to family members seeing as they are the most affluent people I know and the ones most likely to carry an AMEX card.

    I am currently an ESL teacher in Taiwan, and this has inspired me to challenge some of my adult students to participate in this project. Although many people in Asia don’t use credit cards, I believe it will start an interesting dialogue about education in the world. I’ll be sure to post the results on my blog. Thanks for spreading the word!

    Like

  46. Hi Tim,

    I forwarded your blog post (via email) to everyone in my address book and requested they vote (if they have an AM EX card) and forward on.

    The teacher that had the biggest impact on my life was my high school art teacher, Mrs. Porter. I had the opportunity to work with her for several semesters over a few years. She taught me to tap into my creativity and gave me the encouragement to explore my talent like no other teacher had before. She was extremely patient and understanding at a time when the world was very confusing to me (my mother passed away when I was 14).

    I still remember one project where we were to make paper-mache masks.
    I had the vision of an awesome Nikki Sixx mask (mind you this was 1989 and Motley Crue was my lifeblood). The harder I worked on that mask, the worse it looked! When it came time to do the hair, nothing was working (the straw I decided to spraypaint black looked ridiculous)! Sensing my aggrevation, Mrs. Porter came up to me at the end of class and gently said to me, “Just go outside and throw the mask as hard as you can I will just give you a C for effort.” While it was hard to accept a C (being an A student), I couldn’t get outside fast enough! I smashed the mask into the pavement and immediately felt a wave of relief. It was a great lesson: sometimes things don’t turn out the way we hoped, but you can either give up or just try again. We had to move on to another project so I didn’t get to start again on another mask, but it’s a lesson that I have remembered since that day.

    My hope is that all students have the opportunity to have a Mrs. Porter in their life. She was the epitome of teaching excellence.

    Sincerely,
    Jen Z

    Like

  47. Tim – I made it in with 4+ hours to spare, and forwarded to my business buds.

    The teacher who most influenced me, is the HS history teacher had by all 3 of my sons, who was also the baseball coach for 2 of them. His name is Mike Ludwig, and I am proud to call him my dear friend. I have known him almost 10 years now.

    He has helped me to raise these three young men, and instill into them, values which include: hard work ethic, sportsmanship, respect for classmates / teammates and tradition, and a strong drive to win fairly, and to always do the best that one possibly can. Do the work, it’s worth it. Play fair. And a tip of the hat to the student or team who bests you, they helped make you better.

    Wish you would take a few minutes to check out, and possibly promote, my cause….

    http://www.operationfirstresponse.com/ofr_005.htm. This story will bring tears to your eyes, guaranteed.

    Thanks, I know you are busy (as usual)

    Like

  48. First, this is an awesome project! My mother is a completely creative public school teacher and she has spent so much of her income to make learning interesting. Can you believe the only supplies she was given one year was 1000 sheets of copy paper!

    I posted this on my facebook status, because word of mouth from a person you trust is always the best way to get people to take something seriously. I live in the south where this still works:)

    I have had a number of amazing learning experiences but one of the best was in the class of Robert Gallagher. He changed the way I thought about how a class could be taught. I think he had ADD and he had to sustain his interest which sustained ours. First. He never lectured for more that 10 minutes and he let you know exactly how long he would so we could concentrate on his efficient lecturing style. Second. He made us apply everything we learned in the lecture immediately through group work. It could be a discussion, it could be artistic, dramatic, pretty much any way to make us meditate on the ideas. He told us how much time we had and then we would have to report the results to the larger class. Third. He put every worksheet or reading we were going to need for the entire class in one book. What a fantastic idea because he and we always had everything we would ever need for any activity with us–super efficient. (I use this as a teacher) Third. We were always rewarded with a party. Even if it is 10 minutes in 50 you will work really hard for 40 minutes for 10 minutes of fun!

    Like

  49. After sharing the link and making it my status on Facebook, I decided to leave a note.

    As an educator for five years, I’ve seen the difference that quality materials can make in classrooms and for kids. When kids have nice things (this is one of the few times I’ll cave to that idea), they believe that they are worth it, and their self-confidence leads them to better performance in the classroom. I couldn’t wish for anything better for them.

    Like

  50. Hi Tim,

    It’s neat to see a project like the one you’re promoting! Education is lacking in our system and we need to work together to find solutions. Here’s ANOTHER ONE where the money’s already put up for a project–just need people to give us referrals!

    I work with a company who has a marketing director that wants to give away a million books to teens, a book that will educate, uplift and change their lives. The generous person who’s doing this is Jeff Olson, network marketing godfather and author of the book “Slight Edge” who has a new book called “Success for Teens–real teens talk about using the slight edge” and he wants to donate it to non-profits, etc, that could put these books into the hands of teens that need a hand!

    If you go to http://www.successfoundation.org for details on book and see link to apply for the books. It’s a workbook, and gets kids thinking about how to have success in their lives–very empowering!

    Sue Tjernlund
    503-227-5342

    Like

  51. Hey Tim,

    What a great cause! I have notified my group Athletic Body Club on facebook only 6 or 7 hundred people but hey it something right!?

    I personally, do not have an American Express! (STUPID IRISH CREDIT CARD) but im sure some of the people on my facebook group have and I told them to pass it on to any that DO have AMEX cards!

    I liked the hurl in your blog picture a couple weeks ago! It looked familiar!

    I was actually on my FIRST mini retirement (ok I was binge travelling lol) when I bought your book! Got the book in LA airport on the way to Auckland after which I was 4 weeks in Aus and a week in Dubai!

    I’m a black belt in TaeKwonDo and international boxer and have competed international loads of time but money and time off work are always a factor that restricts my travelling/training time. . NOT FOR LONG! I have begun working on my muse and I am following your book to a T. Bring on the FHWW ?

    Have worked a heap of hours in the past (I’m actually a tradesman/plasterer by trade and have been slaving on a building site since I was 12) and I personal train a few people/athletes in my spare time (possibly not the best utilisation of my degree in sport science haha)

    Always wanted to learn MORE German and learn Spanish!

    I have never read a book that was that inspiring and opened my mind to all the things I CAN have and WILL have.


    Bryan Kavanagh

    Like

  52. Tim,

    I’m actually a teacher with the program Teach For America (www.teachforamerica.org). I teach in Southwest Atlanta, Georgia at Ralph J. Bunche middle school. If you don’t know much about the program, follow the link and read up on it!

    I’ve known about donorschoose.org for sometime now. I read your post at school, and even though it was after hours, I made an announcement over the intercom so that all the teachers still in the building could hear it. I also emailed my program director at TFA your post and asked her to send it to anyone she could. I realize that a lot of posters involved more people, but after spending 12 hours at school- grading, working with children, lesson planning, and teaching- it was all I could do.

    The experience that has most changed my life since being a teacher at a Title I school has been watching a boy named Dontrez. At the beginning of the year, Dontrez told me he would kill all ‘white people’. He then made a 7 on his first social studies class. Since then, Dontrez has brought his test grades up to a 79 (almost a B!), and is actively working every day on his homework and classwork (including projects!). He even calls me personally to tell me how his homework is going. It really is a life altering experience to watch children, that through no fault of their own, have been left behind by families, schools, and society as a whole, being able to work hard and succeed. I fully expect this to change the way I view the world, and the things I’m working toward when I leave the world of teaching.

    Like

  53. Thanks for caring about public school education and staff, Tim. What a pleasure to read all the inspiring comments (51 at this time) from people given the opportunity to think of teacher.

    For 16 years, I was one of those public school teachers/coaches and though I’m not in the “real” classroom any longer, I still am teaching through my various websites. As for my favorite teacher, that’s easy: ANY teacher who genuinely cares about young people deserves our support and encouragement.

    Through FB, my blog & my list of 8,300 I shared your request to spread the word. Indeed, these are dark times for many parents, children & public schools. In Florida, the county where I used to teach is down 4300 students in the last two years. It’s easy to think only the inner city schools are at risk, when today almost every public school is at risk. At my 7-year-old son’s grade school, a guidance counselor sadly shared the other day just how large her list has become of parents needing help paying their rent (mortgage payment).

    Tim, especially in these darker times for many people, thank you for carrying the torch, lighting our journey and reminding us there’s much more to life than the material “stuff”.

    Just a thought,Tim, but wouldn’t it be amazing if instead of awarding 10 lucky winners to a private 30-60-minute call where you allow them to ask you anything in the world that (they) defer, asking you instead if you would do a video (or LIVE :) visit to a classroom (near to you or near where you’re traveling today, this week or this month :), spreading your most positive message to the staff and children?

    I would love for EVERY single young person to feel your positive energy.

    Thanks to all who make your blog even more special :)

    Mike

    Like

  54. Cool – have posted on my blog and Facebook

    My most influencial teacher was Mr Osborne. Unlike other teachers, he was not interested in just following the rule book – but in stretching us and preparing us for life (I didn’t realise it at the time – but do now!)

    As a class of 9 and 10 year olds:

    – We did everything in small teams
    – We all had regular opportunities to lead others (very scary at that age)
    – He tried to create healthy competition for most activities we did
    – Encouraged us to stick our neck out, take risks and try something new
    – Rewarded us not just on results – but willingness to step outside comfort zone
    – He would regularly have rows with the head teacher to cover our backs when we not doing exactly as per the ‘rules’ when he felt the rules needed to be flexible

    It resulted in a slightly maverick class that were the most rounded class in school – were performed well academically, in drama, in sport and also led most charitable activies the school did for local community. We were the first group of students from our school to ever compete with local schools in debating competitions, public speaking competitions – all of which game us all a huge bost in self confidence

    Interestingly, even the most apathetic and deadbeat kids got excited about being in he’s class because the culture he’d created within the group made it hard to be a dead beat for very long!

    Like

  55. I’ve twittered and facebooked my our request to vote. thank u for bringing the contest to my attention. It feels nice to participate.

    I’m lucky to have had a top-notch public school education. Oddly though, there wasn’t one individual teacher that I recall having had an impact on my study habits or my life. My strongest influence came from my parents who would sign my homework (even though the teachers or the school never required it), pay me to do current event articles on the weekend and buy me books as rewards. That said, I did like how frank my high school math teacher was – Mr. Cher who always expressed his disappointment in poor grades and pushed for us all to excel. He’d never curve an exam b/c he knew that 100% was not too much to expect.

    Like

  56. Best advice I ever got was from a a teacher named Luis Zelaya: “A degree can be obtained collectively, but one’s true achievements are gained by one’s self”. Basically a paper doesnt tell you who you are, it’s the experiences you go through and the effort you put into things that define who you are today and tomorrow.

    Additionally, your message is here:

    http://help100000children.org (registered an hour ago, hope it works!)
    http://beta2.blipea.com/perfil/josuef (latin version of twitter)

    cheers,

    -Josue

    Like

  57. I’m an Amex holder so I voted. Then posted the voting instructions on my Twitter site.

    My school days started in a small Catholic school in a tiny Mississippi town. In first grade, I had a teacher, Ms. Reagan, who was young, blond…..great looking. She was my science teacher and my male classmates and I sat everyday for one hour listening intently to every word. I learned more science that year than I learned in four years of college!

    Like

  58. Tim,

    1. I do not have a Facebook account or an American Express card, however my wife has both. I forwarded the email and walked her through the process of doing everything asked, including forwarding your request to all of her contacts.

    2. The most influential project in my college career involved a semester working for a children’s homeless shelter in the heart of Ann Arbor named the Ozone House. This house contained a call center for at-risk youth and parents who needed advice on how to handle their children. It was often full and housed approximately 7 children at a time. The center also provided other resources such as clothes, a food pantry, and information for other homeless people. Our project included 5 other members and our main objective was to create awareness of the organization and raise money while doing so. We generated about 300 dollars bucketing and canvassing neighborhoods asking for donations. In addition to the project our team handled inbound calls for the center and debunking the homeless stereotype. Leaving the building and class left me furious about what we saw first hand to children and forever changed the way I treated children. Their actions are a result of learning right from wrong and if they don’t know the difference the community suffers. Abusing and neglecting children is unacceptable and leaving them uneducated falls under those titles. Societies need to be responsible to carry on where someone left off, regardless of the reason. Anything that we can do to advance and educate our younger generations in a positive direction should be done.

    Like

  59. Tim,

    Thanks for using your influence to make a difference (and highlighting a cause/event I otherwise wouldn’t have known about)!

    I added the following short & sweet version to my Twitter & Facebook:
    “One small click today: http://snipurl.com/3zbdi; one giant educational leap for the leaders of tomorrow…”

    My audience is smaller, but hopefully they’re listening too. Keep up the great work.

    R

    Like

  60. Vote is in. I don’t have a card, but immediately called my mother who does and asked for her card number while assuring her my financial situation is fine :)

    The most influential teacher in my life was Professor Steven Walker from Brigham Young University who brought literature to life, gave me the confidence to question, and taught me that life experience was more important than academic accomplishment. I’ll always treasure a letter he wrote to my husband and I personally congratulating us on our marriage. A truly gifted teacher who has a passion for teaching.

    Thanks for the post,

    Cherie

    Like

  61. I have updated and pointed as many people as I can to the link. I will try to push as many people to vote.

    I Loved every day in school and quite possibly every single teacher made school better and gave me something to think about. I can remember a few of them but can always thank all of them.

    Like

  62. I changed my facebook status and sent an email to close friends and family reminding them that if Los Angeles doesn’t support it’s schools we can get ready for huge crimewaves.

    Then I went on to explain that I’d have to move in with them, kids in tow.

    Like

  63. Posted on facebook profile: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=693074722&ref=profile

    First, I would have to mention you as a great teacher, I wouldn’t be on the blog if I didn’t read the book… everything after reading 4HWW is owed to your writing as the catalyst.

    My greatest teacher is my mother. I had many great experiences and individuals throughout elementary, secondary and collegiate schooling, but far and away I learned the most and experienced the best from her. She was always around and always had an active interest; she couldn’t fail.

    Eventually she became a teacher herself (she actually finished her degree at Arizona State the year I was a freshman there), so she had a knack for it.

    I agree with you in your thinking that societies ills will only be solved in the long term through education.

    I also would say that the greater hope would be if we all could work less, more parents could be their child’s best teacher.

    Thanks for your work,

    Brian

    Like

  64. Tim I came up with a web page idea to spread the word.

    http://help100000children.org/

    Hope you enjoy!

    BONUS:
    My greatest and most influential teacher lives by the name of Ildefonso Gonzales, a Spanish teacher at my former school. His professional character and his experience on life taught some great lessons. I live my daily life through one of his quotes:

    “Si intentas y fracasas segui intentando. El verdadero fracaso es cuando dejas de intentar”

    “If you try and fail, keep trying. The only true failure is when you stop trying”

    Cheers.

    – Carlos

    Like

  65. I changed my facebook status and sent an email to close friends and family reminding them that if Los Angeles doesn’t support it’s schools we can get ready for huge crimewaves.

    Then I went on to explain that I’d have to move in with them, kids in tow.

    (also had to do this using ie, you site crashed my firefox)

    Like

  66. Tim I came up with a web page idea to spread the word.

    http://help100000children.org/

    Hope you enjoy!

    BONUS:
    My greatest and most influential teacher lives by the name of Ildefonso Gonzales, a Spanish teacher at my former school. His professional character and his experience on life taught some great lessons. I live my daily life through one of his quotes:

    “Si intentas y fracasas segui intentando. El verdadero fracaso es cuando dejas de intentar”

    “If you try and fail, keep trying. The only true failure is when you stop trying”

    Like

  67. Dear Tim, I _really_ hope you get the necessary votes!

    I did everything I could do!
    1) Made an adwords campaign! http://cvk.ca/tmp/ad.png [Someone actually clicked on it while I was writing this post] 1) Changed Facebook Status 2) Tweeted about it 3) Told a few close friends explicitly 4) Changed Windows Messenger Status 5) Changed GTalk status 6) Changed Yahoo Messenger Status 7) I tried to looking for my floormate who has a decent sized blogged, but he’s out of town :(

    I think the education system has so much potential, and that we’re undervaluing the effect it has on our children and society! There’s so much research we could be applying to improve our schools. For example, studies have shown that teaching Esperanto can significantly reduce the amount of time it takes to acquire secondary languages, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propaedeutic_value_of_Esperanto. I envision schools which base their curriculum off of hard data and experimentation =)

    My grade 12 French inspired me about romance, philosophy & culture. At the time, I was deeply involved in robotics, software engineering and mathematics, and I didn’t really care about his french class – I often would just ignore his lessons and settle for passing marks.

    He never took it personally though, he respected me for who I was, and started actually showing interest in my hobbies! I showed him some of the robotics that I was working on and he was completely astounded and said I was going to be very successful in life.

    However, then he started to surprise me! He had this amazing passion for french and french culture, and I couldn’t help but be dawn in to his world. One class, he brought in his guitar and played bilingual love songs and sung! Another class, he had recently watched his wife give birth, and he told us the entire story! Including how he broke out crying after delivery, it was very beautiful.

    Through his eyes, I started seeing a completely different perspective to life, a view far more romantic, passionate, and lively. I think he’s responsible for some major decisions I’ve made recently, including to do a lot of traveling and explore culture. And traveling has -completely- changed me =)

    I still go back to visit him when I came. He now has 2 kids =) I don’t think he’s ever going to be anyone ‘famous’ but he’ll always have affected his students and me.

    Good luck Tim, best wishes!!

    Like

  68. Tim I came up with a web page idea to spread the word.

    Hope you enjoy!

    BONUS:
    My greatest and most influential teacher lives by the name of Ildefonso Gonzales, a Spanish teacher at my former school. His professional character and his experience on life taught some great lessons. I live my daily life through one of his quotes:

    “Si intentas y fracasas segui intentando. El verdadero fracaso es cuando dejas de intentar”

    “If you try and fail, keep trying. The only true failure is when you stop trying”

    Like

  69. I have updated and pointed as many people as I can to the link. I will try to push as many people to vote.

    I Loved every day in school and quite possibly every single teacher made school better and gave me something to think about. I can remember a few of them but can always thank all of them.

    Love the site and still reading the book.

    Like

  70. I put the link on my linked in page.I have many foundation staff members in my network and I hope that bringing donor’s choose to their attention will ensure long term funding for this amazing organization.

    The teacher that has influenced me the most was Mrs. Ballard, my gym teacher and advisor for the African American student organization. She taught me that true service requires preparation. Because of her I attended college and graduate school. I am now one of the youngest foundation executive directors in the nation. I could not have done it without her support and encouragement.

    Like

  71. Tim I came up with a website idea to spread the word. Check it out.

    BONUS:

    The greatest teacher I have ever had lives by the name of Ildefonso Gonzales. His professional teaching and his views on life taught me lessons that a book, school, or teacher will never teach you. I live my daily life through one of his quotes:

    “Si intentas y fracasas, segui intentando. El unico fracaso es cuando dejas de intentar.”

    “If you try and fail, keep trying. The only true failure is when you stop trying.”

    Enjoy!

    -Carlos

    Like

  72. Tim,

    You are an amazing man and I am impressed with your honest efforts to make things better for others…education is one of the ways that truly brings children, adolescents or adults out of ignorance to be a better advocate for themselef then for others. I casted my vote with less than two and a half hours and encouraged my uncle to do the same.

    The most influential teacher in my life was my Psychology teacher/camus ministry counselor who encouraged me to be myself. Brother Paul was a man of conviction, courage and a true desire to help others with a gentle approach to life. He made learning fun with the use of humor and took the time to get to know his students personally. Being aware of a diificult time I had at home, he listened without judgement while encouraging me to make my own decisons with some gentle guidance. His impact on my life encouraged me to go on and become a Special Education teacher, although I stayed in the field for only three years then went on to work in the human service field. I have never lost my desire to learn and teach others.

    In that effort, family and friends started a scholarship fund in memory of my stepson who passed away unexpectedly six years ago at the age of twenty-one. You can see what a small group of committed people can do to make a difference in supporting students to continue their education after high school by awarding scholarships. http://www.rememberbrian.org

    One last note, I found out about your blog and interesting lifestye after going to the website on Total Immersion. I am training for a tri next Spring.

    Keep up your great work and hopefully our efforts will help this group.

    Thanks,

    Scott

    Like

  73. Hi Tim,

    I am glad that you are supporting a worthy cause. I have voted and posted on my facebook wall and notified all friends. I have passed this information on to my wife and she is campaigning as I write this.

    I think my best memory from grade school was the Desert Winds Steel Drum Band. It was a very unique program that our school music teacher put together and funded himself.At the time, I remember thinking that there must be nothing like it in the whole world.

    I have kids of my own now and they certainly have a number of great programs but nothing that exotic. It was really interesting considering the music room was a trailer in the desert and here we were playing this tropical styled uplifting music surrounded by dirt, dust devils and saguaro cactus.

    Anyway, I would really like to participate in the phone interview! After reading your book I liberated myself from 45-50 hrs a week to 20hrs by taking contract position (wohoo 1099). Now I am working on automation efforts. FYI – I noticed that you are speaking in SF on Oct 25th. Any chance you would give a jobless guy a free ticket?

    If not, I am willing to take the Karma goodness and run with that. Keep up the good work.
    -Robert.

    Like

  74. I really love this stuff Tim.

    Here is how I helped: I don’t have an AMEX, but I tweeted my friends and called the few people I know who are AMEX customers and gave them the news.

    Inspiration and then bonus answer:

    I have a good friend in Lumbini Nepal who I speak with weekly. He and I are discussing working on an NGO in the future that will help build schools in Nepal. I actually had an idea that I have discussed with friends and I wanted to bounce it off you and the wonderful participants of your blog. I will preface it with a quick story:

    I used to be a YMCA camp counselor and life guard for about 250 children ages 5-13 for 4 years of my life. I was hesitant to start the job out of worry of the responsibility I would be handed, only to discover later that I have a knack for working with, teaching and mentoring children. I dealt with children of rich families and destitute families and children with acute illnesses like ADHD (medicated), Asberger’s, Autism and more. We didn’t have running water, electricity or any building or structure to shelter us from storms, but that was part of the camp feel-it was rustic. The children would be away from their parents and with us for 12-15 hours per day during the summer so we became their families 2-3 months out of the year. We weren’t by any means in a bad situation because of the primitive environment, the conditions were to lower the burden on families while simultaneously providing a once in a lifetime experience for the children.
    What I gathered from my years as a counselor has not been exceeded before or since and when I sit in my desk chair at work and zone out I feel like Frodo dreaming of the Shire.
    The counselors I worked with were all my age at the time (17-21) so they were young, vivacious, and totally enraptured the children with lessons, knowledge, wisdom, story time, canoe lessons, friendship and discipline.

    Ok so now that you know the inspiration of my idea, here is the idea itself:

    I want to start an organization that focuses on recruiting people in their late teens to early twenties and higher that have those same feelings I did and still do. We will focus on paying for that individual’s airfare, room and board, and an allowance, in exchange for their devotion to travel to a certain area, much like a missionary, only to stay and enrich a group of children for a while. The main problem I find with many non profits that I have seen in the past is the lack of urge on the side of the donor other than fiscally. Unfortunately, money alone cannot educate. Of course you have experience with Donorschoose, but there can never be enough help.
    The enabling feature to travel to any one place and stay there for 3+ months and teach the local children as well as learn the local culture will create a tremendous interest in the hearts and minds of several people here in the states and abroad. I am one of those people. When I escape certain unnecessary responsibilities here in the US, I will travel abroad for extended periods of time and attempt to walk like my mentor.
    This type of public service may create a large enough interest from the community that older children may flock enmass to participate.

    Please let me know what you think.

    Jeremiah Smith

    Like

  75. Now, on to the bonus points :)

    So I have personally had several inspirations in my life and I would like to share just two of my mentors here with you.

    1.Randall Card: This man was my Information Systems Technology teacher 3 of my 4 years in high school. On the first day of class he said “I am supposed to teach you technology. Because this school does not specifically tell me what I am supposed to teach you in the fields of technology, then I will interpret that neglect as an opportunity to make my own lesson plan as we go.” He continued by defining for us (all guys) the term “Technology”. TECHNOLOGY: The use of tools to simplify one’s life.
    He said, “this does not necessarily mean mechanical or physical tools, so emotional and cognitive tools are included. Let us go over all the simple tools really quick: “Lever, Inclined Plane, Wheel & Axel, Screw, Wedge & Pulley”. He handed us a 2 page breakdown of all the 6 simple tools and told us to read it for homework. Then he said “Now we can move on to the intellectual tools and if anyone asks, you already learned the 6 most common tools and their applications on the first day of class.”
    His first ‘real’ lesson was to write a quote on the board. He said “I will write a tool on this board every day at the beginning of class and you will all get 10 minutes to digest it before we discuss it for the remaining 80 minutes.” His first quote:

    “Give a man a fish, he will eat for a day. Teach him how to fish, he’ll eat forever”

    This first 5 minutes struck a controversial, deep and everlasting chord with me and I haven’t been the same since. Every day of class continued the same, and some even had us get really emotional as we accepted the new pieces of wisdom like a foreign medical object in a hospital.
    I have gone back to my high school and looked up Randal Card all over the place, but I cannot find him. I wish I could tell him 5 years late how much he has helped me.

    2. Terry McGonigle: My senior year of high school, I still hadn’t tried anything extracurricular other than the extremely informal but fun *cough cough* chess club *cough cough*.
    Because my father has been an actor since before I was born, and he has been in many major hits, I decided maybe I could try my hand at theatre.
    I had always been afraid and intimidated by the theatre teacher who was at our school before Terry. She had won our school 8 consecutive state championships (GA) in theatre, but all the student actors seemed like the Jackson 5 with the amount of pressure they endured.
    I had to choose an elective for senior year so I chose theatre based on the fact that there was a new teacher who would teach the other half of the classes so our previous teacher could focus on the championships.
    I met Mr. McGonigle on the first day of class and he and I hit it off pretty quick. He was funny and I was a funny senior ready to be a class clown. After he saw my urge to participate in something he asked me to be the lead role in his play which had already been cast with 45 actors who had experience. I was shocked, but I took the role and the other teacher got so upset at him and me when she found out someone without experience was the lead role. I studied relentlessly for 2 months before our first play and was a nervous wreck. I went on with the show and after our 3rd performance I was on fire. We did 11 performances that year and I formed a tight bond with McGonigle, but none of the people I worked with on the play. This may seem sad, but the lesson here is, if you truly want to do something, sometimes you really do not even need the proper credentials or promotional following to do it. Sometimes you can slip right in just because you are the right person and destiny aligned. Also, when you get there, you may only leave with the experience. I could have left with 45 new friends, but they had been doing this stuff their whole lives and were jealous that I made it ahead of them. Also, I was on another level, I wanted to leave high school with a few very close friends instead of 45 distant friends, which is what they were to each other. I still talk to almost all of my real close friends to this day and I accept when we venture our different ways.

    I think to not let someone go the path that their heart takes them is inhumane and also very very common. I feel that enabling fervent young mentors to educate the younger leaders of the world is a way to build a Utopian society, or a greater focus on the needs and honest wants of the common good. I want badly to be a part of something big, even if nobody knows I’m involved, I want to help each child individually, and I feel that a close brother or sister like figure would be the ideal patron for that cause.

    Thank you Tim for the awesome opportunities and I pray I can impact education, children, and the lives of others in the way you and several others have impacted me.

    Thanks all!

    Jeremiah Smith

    Like

  76. Tim- great way to fill the void,

    I decided to approach this by leveraging my personal network

    I’m a student in Tucson AZ, attending both Pima community college (PCC) and the University of Arizona (UofA) I’m also the former Adfed student president of my school and have many contacts in the Local Advertising and media fields.

    Both schools have a college centric E-mail system, each allowing you to contact by email every student I every student I ever have a class with

    1. Thought this system and the past class archive I was able to obtain the email for every student and every teacher, (That’s lots of people :O) and I can do this because there is no student spam feature.

    I wrote them a “student” tailored massage with:
    – A short disruption of the mission
    – A link to the URL you gave
    – And in a “call to action” I asking them to forward the e-mail to there list.
    – And a PS: Please help me in this cause. Give 13 seconds of your time and you can have a very real chance of getting 100,000 students $1.5 million for education.

    2. And because I don’t have the access to reach every student I recruited (by phone) my close school friends who have different majors. I asked them to do the same thing and help me reach more students. (Got 90% yes rate :) )

    3. With my personal list of contacts in the Local Advertising and media I connected everyone with a similar E-mail (but tailored differently) asking them to use there network to spread the word.

    4. I also contacted my very good friend who is a graphic designer at a local news station. She is going to recommend this to the Producer for the Ten-o’clock. This is a long shot but cross your fingers.

    5. I gave a quick call to about 15 extended family members and gave them the speech. Then followed up by E-mailing them the URLs

    6. and a “Dig” for good luck.

    ———————————

    As for the teacher, class, or school project had the biggest impact on my like:
    I have to say the teacher that had the biggest impact on me (other then my father) was my digital arts teach. He helped me develop my passion for my art and gave me the confidence to act on behalf of it.

    ————-
    ————-

    Good luck to all, go get those votes
    -Chris

    Like

  77. Tim

    Great post on education. I truly believe it is a great equalizer.Cross the right education with what a person is good at and they never have a job again. It is called your passion. Thanks for these blog updates
    Leonard

    Like

  78. Dear Tim, I _really_ hope you get the necessary votes!

    I did everything I could do!
    1) Made an adwords campaign! http://cvk.ca/tmp/ad.png [Someone actually clicked on it while I was writing this post] 1) Changed Facebook Status 2) Tweeted about it 3) Called a few close friends told them to do it 4) Changed Windows Messenger Status 5) Changed GTalk status 6) Changed Yahoo Messenger Status 8) Digged 7) I tried to looking for my floormate who has a decent sized blogged, but he’s out of town :(

    I think the education system has so much potential, and that we’re undervaluing the effect it has on our children and society! There’s so much research we could be applying to improve our schools. For example, studies have shown that teaching Esperanto can significantly reduce the amount of time it takes to acquire secondary languages, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propaedeutic_value_of_Esperanto. I envision schools which base their curriculum off of hard data and experimentation =)

    My grade 12 French inspired me about romance, philosophy & culture. At the time, I was deeply involved in robotics, software engineering and mathematics, and I didn’t really care about his french class – I often would just ignore his lessons and settle for passing marks.

    He never took it personally though, he respected me for who I was, and started actually showing interest in my hobbies! I showed him some of the robotics that I was working on and he was completely astounded and said I was going to be very successful in life.

    However, then he started to surprise me! He had this amazing passion for french and french culture, and I couldn’t help but be dawn in to his world. One class, he brought in his guitar and played bilingual love songs and sung! Another class, he had recently watched his wife give birth, and he told us the entire story! Including how he broke out crying after delivery, it was very beautiful.

    Through his eyes, I started seeing a completely different perspective to life, a view far more romantic, passionate, and lively. I think he’s responsible for some major decisions I’ve made recently, including to do a lot of traveling and explore culture. And traveling has -completely- changed me =)

    I still go back to visit him when I came. He now has 2 kids =) I don’t think he’s ever going to be anyone ‘famous’ but he’ll always have affected his students and me.

    Good luck Tim, best wishes!!

    J

    Like

  79. 1. I slapped a post-it on the monitor of everyone I work with. I told them to check out the site and then take the post it another department and slap it there, asking them to do the same.

    2. Mrs. Kaag made the biggest difference in my life. She told me I should join the Army to keep me out of prison. She was right, I was in prison – to do work, not as an imate. To this day when someone tells me I can’t do something it becomes the challenge that makes me do it. I ran 50miles in 8 hours – someone told me I would not be able to. Finished college – lots of people told me I would not. Qualified for the Boston marathon on the first try – some chick told me I was aiming too high. All this goes back to some guidance counselor named Kaag (AKA Kaag the Haag), telling me at 16 years old what my future would be. Maybe I just like proving people wrong, or maybe I just like telling/showing people that the perceived impossible is possible. Someone with determination, persistence, and goals becomes something to talk about.

    Like

  80. Tim,

    1. I just submitted my vote for DonorsChoose and sent an email to everyone I know who has an American Express card. My mother alone will help to spread this thing to countless potential voters! I’ve also posted a quick blurb about this to my Twitter followers.

    2. The best teacher I ever had was my video production teacher in high school. He showed me that I could use my weaknesses (social anxiety) to my advantage. He taught me how to use film and video as a way of expressing myself. He was the first teacher I ever had who allowed me to just play around, make mistakes, and discover what worked for me. This allowed me to grow and learn so much faster than I had ever done in the past. When I wrote my first book, I dedicated it to him!

    Keep up the good work!

    Like

  81. Tim

    Thanks for this postings on education. When a person gets an education that matches with their passion you get a calling.

    thanks

    Like

  82. Tim,

    Done and done. I’ve sent the tweet, updated the facebook status, and sent out smoke signals to all my friends that don’t have the internet…but I guess that probably won’t have too big of an impact since they won’t be able to vote.

    I appreciate the fact that you brought this to the attention of the blog readers. I had no knowledge of it until reading the blog post and, being the son of a teacher, I can certainly appreciate the need for quality education. It is frustrating to think that the mistakes made by the adults of this generation could be repeated if we don’t make a consistent commitment to arming future generations with the knowledge to tackle problems in a logical, solution-based manner rather than by doing what has always been done.

    You can count on my support,

    Cale

    Like

  83. Always enjoy your posts – this no less.

    > 50, so I don’t have Twitter, Facebook or Myspace accts ;(

    But I have had an Amex for many yrs, so I voted for Help 100K Children. Hope it helps. (I own a couple businesses, including a fax broadcast company, so I’ll launch a job to a couple hundred customers tomorrow urging them to vote with their mouse.)

    Doesn’t it seem tragic that teachers need to pay for their own supplies? At least they should be deductible as a business expense. Maybe in the flurry of bail-out legislation they could ‘ear mark’ that little pearl.

    I’ve helped local inner city Catholic schools for years. My IT service company even participated in the Universal Service Fund to get them cheap Internet and phone service. What a waste. (My blog lambastes the FCC program that administers this billion dollar disaster.) What warped priorities we must have to rebuild schools in Iraq and not New York?

    Meanwhile, I clearly remember my sixth grade math teacher: Mr. Nick Molnar who punished us with math series questions…they seem simple now (thanks to him.) Like: “5, 10, 30, 60. What are the next two numbers?” I graduated with an engineering degree and went on to law/business schools thanks to great parents and inspiring teachers. Why do they seem so rare now?

    Final point: A guy I met at church engaged me in conversation once. He was different than me: black, poor, street smart. We talked about what can change a kid’s life. He said two things: hope & education. I don’t know what Help 100K Children can do about hope, but it’s a good start at education.

    Good luck and thanks for a great book.

    Kim Brand
    Indianapolis

    Like

  84. Tim,

    I normally would have read this and not done anything, since there is only 1 hour left in the voting. Your post a while back “Why Bigger Goals = Less Competition” hammered home something I’ve always suspected but never vocalized. As a result, I decided to act instead of letting someone else. This isn’t the most difficult task, but then I don’t have to win the phone call or the $150 to win. All I have to do is help vote to get funding for a great cause. It’s a no-lose proposition.

    I dug out the old Amex card
    (since the one with the better interest rate wouldn’t register), voted, and added a paraphrased link to my Facebook status (as your better but longer message wouldn’t fit).

    Hopefully the kids will win as a result of your post. If that happens, I’ll already have won.

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  85. Great cause. Voted, Twitted and updated my FB profile. Great pleasure. Good karma indeed.
    My history teacher in high school had deep influence on me. She taught me that fate is not deterministic and we – as “ordinary people” – have the right and power to change it. Only those who dared to stand up for their rights or think in ways that others didn’t perceive as possible, managed to change things – as small as their way of life, and as big as the future of their nations.

    Thanks for the inspiration Tim.

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  86. I just updated my Facebook status, asked any friends logged in to chat to take a break and vote if they have an AMEX card, and posted to Twitter.

    The educator who had the biggest influence on me was my elementary school principal, Dr. Anne Lyons. When I was in first grade I would visit her in her office and we’d read together. I have no idea how the arrangement ever came to be, but it instilled a love of reading in me that has persisted all of my life. She encouraged me and gave me extra opportunities because I looked for them, and as I look back I realize how lucky I was that she took that extra bit of interest in me.

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  87. Tim,
    I received your new blog post about an hour before the deadline but got right on it. I hit up my facebook contacts as well as my twitter page. Hopefully it will reach as many people as possible and get some positive votes in. I was able to cast my vote as a guest but it counts none the less!
    As for a short story on what teacher has inspired me the most, I would have to say Jim Piorkowski, the head of the guitar department at the State University of New York at Fredonia. I studied with him from 98′ to 01′. He was the first person to get me my first guitar student. During my softmore year, he told me that there was someone who wanted to learn guitar so that they could pass the audition to get into the school of music and that I would be the best person to teach him. Up until that point I had no idea i was good enough to teach others. Since graduation in 02′, teaching guitar and piano has been my profession and main source of income. Last year I also put out my own guitar instructional videos called “Rock Guitar Power” so that I can reach out to more people and get them to learn to play the guitar.
    I’ve worked with hundreds of students, mostly in their teenage years and it has been awesome to be a positive force in their lives. Even though guitar is not a necessary thing for the kids in members project, any help they can get to give them a better education is well worth the time and effort!
    Thanks for inspiring me and others to take action and make positive things happen.

    Mike Deiure

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