4HWW Cover Story in Men's Journal (Plus: Be in a Movie)

74 Comments

“Nothing bothers me more than sloth. The objective is to fix mistakes of ambition and not make mistakes of sloth. I work my ass off.”
-Tim Ferriss, from the new issue of Men’s Journal, Sept. 2008

Since I’m going nuts preparing for Burning Man, this post will be a short one.

The quote above is from the latest issue of Men’s Journal, where the main editorial cover story is a profile of me and the rise of The 4-Hour Workweek. There are also fascinating profiles of John McEnroe (awesome insight into his tennis strategies) and Gavin Newsom, as well as a cool snapshot of Tonny Sorensen, CEO of Von Dutch and former world champion in Tae Kwon Do.

The journalist, Larry Smith, spent almost three full days with me and covers a lot of details that haven’t been covered before, including background and education; core tenets of lifestyle design and common misinterpretations; interviews with family, professors, and friends; experiments involving critics; even how I organize my environment and home…

If you like the feature and find something useful, which I think most readers will, please let Men’s Journal know. Just take 10 seconds and shoot a quick e-mail to letters@mensjournal.com.

I think it would be cool to do an edgy monthly piece with them or similar magazine, but the demand needs to be clear. Letters to the editor is how you show demand.

To address the criticism of me in the last paragraph on pg. 200, I encourage you all to read this post on my SXSW panel. Here’s the Cliff Notes version:

Tim Ferriss (that’s me)
Please note that I was asked to also be a panelist and not just the moderator, so I’m participating in the discussion, not being a mic hog :)

Enjoy! More how-to and instructionals coming soon.

For an extra bonus, also check out what Gavin has on his bookshelf on pg. 196. Talk about a fun surprise.

###

Odds and Ends: Be in a movie! Deadline August 22nd.

Summary: 4-Hour Workweek Case Studies
Category: Lifestyle & Entertainment Documentary
Deadline: 6:00 PM PACIFIC – August 22

Case studies sought:

“I’m looking for people who have read Tim Ferriss’ 4-Hour Workweek’ to feature in a documentary… for all ranges of implementation, from those who have found a way to work 4 hours a week, to those [who’ve applied] a few of the techniques, such as outsourcing tasks to [overseas] assistants.”

Contact: Joey Daoud
Email: lifehackdoc@gmail.com

Posted on: August 12, 2008.

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Comment Rules: Remember what Fonzie was like? Cool. That’s how we’re gonna be — cool. Critical is fine, but if you’re rude, we’ll delete your stuff. Please do not put your URL in the comment text and please use your PERSONAL name or initials and not your business name, as the latter comes off like spam. Have fun and thanks for adding to the conversation! (Thanks to Brian Oberkirch for the inspiration)

74 comments on “4HWW Cover Story in Men's Journal (Plus: Be in a Movie)

  1. That is one thing I have noticed about the various interviewers, is that they haven’t seen any of your other interviews, or just seem to neglect what was covered in them. I’ll be interested to see some new stuff come out of this interview. I hope they don’t ask the “So do you really just work 4 hours a week…….question!”

    By the way, in reference to your quote above, under the picture, I posted the Steve Jobs quote from 4HWW in my shower to remind me not to go on living the life I don’t want to. See my post about that concept:

    http://snipurl.com/3hx4d

    Like

  2. Hey Tim,

    Read the interview. Again the media tries to paint authors into a corner by generalizing the concepts rather than looking at the main position of the book. I got the same thing when I was on Donny Deutsch. It seems writers are looking to pick a part every piece of a book rather than look at the points that fit for everyone. I think he tried to play the age card, which I also face. At some point business is going to realize that the old boys don’t have all the answers.

    Big fan of the book and good to see it in Men’s Journal. The people who get the message…get the message.

    Cheers,

    Chris.

    Like

  3. Hi Tim,

    great to see you in Men’s Journal! I read your book more then one time and love it. It’s a great resource and it brings hope to escape the 9 to 5 (or actual 9 to 22).

    Cheers, Tom

    Like

  4. Hi Tim,

    Good article to read about you, and nice to see some well balanced journalistic criticism.

    Throughout your interviews, conferences, speeches etc. you continue on a very consistent message which is highly commendable and shows how much you believe in your aspiring concepts.

    Also, I notice in the article and add very for a Mens grooming product (back shaver), you’ve got to wonder if that is someone’s muse haven’t you!

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Like

  5. @ Chris x 2 and Tom,

    Thanks much for the comments. Chris @ L, I appreciate the note on messaging.

    It’s simple for me to remain consistent b/c I actually do practice what I preach. What I suggest is what I do. Experts often contradict earlier statements or suggestions, and it – more often than I’d like to think – indicates a “do as I say, not as I do” approach to pandering or selling. This isn’t to say I’m a moral purist — I just do what I write. It gives me less to remember.

    Thanks again for contributing to the conversation,

    Tim

    Like

  6. Hey Tim, sorry to hear about what happened with your gf man, that sux. Looks like it was a good thing though, since you became a DEALmaker, and not to mention, have friends/mentors like Style and David D. ;-) Your online game is appreciated by men around the globe nowadays.

    -Cam

    Like

  7. What is neat about Larry Smith is he waited to test some of your theories, like the outsourcing, so that he could come from a viewpoint of experience rather than pure skepticism. This is one of the better interviews of Tim I have seen and I have read or watched about 20 now. I like how it goes into Tim’s home to show us a few things that are lurking there. I found the row of 4HWW’s and the saliva samples very interesting.

    Like

  8. Interesting article. I really liked the emphasis on the 4HWW not being about “sloth” and being more about keep “work” to the minimum required to live your dream life. That’s one of the biggest elements of the book for me.

    I don’t share Larry’s view that the weakest part of the book was the muse generation part although that is , for me, the pivotal part because if I can’t find my muse I’m not going to be able to live as I wish.

    As this is so key to the 4HWW enterprise Tim do you have any plans on writing more substantively on how to find and implement your muse? I’m sure I’m not alone in saying that more information would be well received.

    Andrew

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  9. This is great. One of my favorite books and magazines converging as one in a spectacular issue. Tim, you must be flattered that, of all 12 months of the year, you were included in their “Perfect Things” annual issue.

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  10. Hi Tim,

    Great article…I had one question though. Why do you think in Larry Smith’s poll people thought that your Income Autopilot chapters were weak. I actually felt I got a lot out of it.

    Do people think there is always only one answer to making it work and that they expected you to give it to them?

    I didn’t think you were saying that it was a Get-Rich-Quick sceme, it just read like a road map to me and that application was necessary because each business situation can be considered different. Plus I felt that you were leaving this open for a new book and/or some other future content opportunity.

    Thanks
    Shawn

    Like

  11. Tim,

    I managed to muscle my way through the boys in the magazine section yesterday!

    I consider myself a fan of yours, but still quite objective. It was a very interesting and made a stab at being fair, until the last paragraph.

    Larry is fond of a cheap shot, no? Mr. Smith should get himself a pair and try writing with less passive aggressive tendencies. It’s simply unattractive.

    Like

  12. Hey Tim,
    Really cool article, I think this is one of the better written ones on you I have read. I agree with Sean above on the “do you work 4 hours” question… lame!

    The article mentions something that I have been playing with on my own lately: Kettle Bell workouts. Do you have any great resources you would recommend for a newbie? I just bought a couple kettle bells (a 12 & a 16 KG) and watched the hilarious Soviet Pavel video… but you seem to have an interesting twist in that you are doing high reps. Any thoughts you have on this would be welcome.

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  13. I picked the magazine up yesterday it was a great read. It was very interesting to hear “your perspective” through someone else’s voice. I actually forwarded the article to one of my production crew members for Jet Set Life that wanted to know who this guy was that I blog and talk about all the time. Be Well and have fun at burning man.
    Rob

    Like

  14. Hi Tim,

    Could you write a post about your practice of keeping notes? The Men’s Journal article mentioned it. Also, you have referred to keeping notes and indexes of books you read. I would be interested in how you organize your notes.

    I have always admired the fact that Bruce Lee was a furious notetaker, but I haven’t really grasped his organization style. It seems that he had separate notebooks and calendars for workout logs, writings, Jeet Kune Do principles, etc.

    Maybe it’s an old habit from school days, but my inclination is to keep separate notebooks for separate subjects– one notebook for workout logs, one for food journal, one for my creative project, one for random thoughts, and one for collecting info. Of course, I cannot carry all those around with me. Somehow, keeping one notebook for everything seems difficult to refer back to.

    Of course, keeping notes from the internet could be a whole other discussion.

    Like

  15. Tim, your work is allowing me to change my life slowly but surely, I am still stuck in the 9-5 but every time I have the priveldge of reading about your philosophy it pours fuel on my fire to get the hell out of my job and build the life I want to create for myself. I don’t give a damn what the critics say there is nothing in this planet, there is no teacher out there that can break things down the way you have in your book, and created for yourself as an example. Keep going man you are an inspiration and role model to many people including myself. Thanks for all the work you have put in so that I can one day (soon) work less!

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  16. Hi Tim: Am a fan, recommend you/book/blog to all. Am prez of start-up film co. raising $16M & $30M and use your advice to help me in many ways. Agree completely re trying to reach the unreachable person ie Warren Buffet or T.Boone Pickens. Have done that kind of thing myself. And am looking forward to reading the interview. Would like to try and reach you. How about meeting at BM next week? Talk, share, and ask if you might be able to help – maybe contacts, advice, etc. I’d love to share dance notes – I taught disco 20+ yrs ago. Would love tango tips – I love B.A. want to go every year. Loved swimming blog – totally get it and relate – one of my fav sports. You are a great example – something we all need. Warm regards, Karen

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