Krill Oil 48x Better Than Fish Oil?

166 Comments


Krill isn’t your average shrimp. (Photo: The Sun and Doves)

Krill oil, logically enough, comes from krill, which are small, shrimp like crustaceans that inhabit the cold ocean areas of the world, primarily the Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans.

Despite their small size–one to five centimeters in length–krill make up the largest animal biomass on the planet. According to Neptune Technologies, the Canadian company that holds the patent for krill oil extraction, there are approximately 500 million tons of krill roaming around in these northern seas, 110,000 tons of which are harvested annually.

Krill oil, like fish oil, contains both of the omega-3 fats, eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA), but hooked together in a different form…

In fish oil, these omega-3 fatty acids are found in the triglyceride form, whereas in krill oil they are hooked up in a double chain phospholipid structure. The fats in our own cell walls are in the phospholipid form.

Attached to the EPA leg of the phospholipid is a molecule of astaxanthin, an extremely potent anti-oxidant. The phospholipid structure of the EPA and DHA in krill oil makes them much more absorbable and allows for a much easier entrance into the mitochondria and the cellular nucleus. In addition to EPA and DHA, krill oil contains a complex phospholipid profile including phosphatidylcholine, a potent source of reductive-stress-reducing choline, which also acts as a natural emulsifier.

Krill oil contains vitamin E, vitamin A, vitamin D and canthaxanthin, which is — like astaxanthin — a potent anti-oxidant. The anti-oxidant potency of krill oil is such that when compared to fish oil in terms of ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorptance Capacity) values, it was found to be 48 times more potent than fish oil.

The astaxanthin found in krill oil provides excellent protection against ultraviolet light and UV-induced skin damage. It was for this reason that I started taking krill oil to begin with–-I discovered its other virtues later on.

A number of studies have shown that krill oil is tremendously effective in reducing LDL-cholesterol, raising HDL-cholesterol (up to 44% in some cases), and lowering blood sugar. It has been shown to be effective in treating the pain and inflammation from rheumatoid arthritis and aches and pains in general. One large study showed that krill oil has tremendous benefits in terms of symptom reduction in PMS and dysmenorrhea. And it has been shown to be effective in the treatment of adult ADHD. In all these studies krill oil was tested against fish oil and not simply a placebo.

Due to the rapid absorption of krill oil and the high anti-oxidant content there is virtually never the fishy burping and aftertaste sometimes experienced with fish oil. The jury is out right now on if and to what degree there is a problem for those people allergic to shrimp. Until the jury is in, I would be careful in taking krill oil if I had a shrimp allergy.

Are there any downsides to this substance?

Only one. It is a little more expensive than fish oil, but, as with all things, you get what you pay for. virtually all krill oil is produced by Neptune Technologies and shipped to the various supplement manufacturers, so any krill oil you get will have come from the same place and be the same dosage. The only unknown is how long it has been sitting around in a warehouse somewhere, which is, of course, the same unknown with fish oil. At least with krill oil, thanks to the high anti-oxidant content, the shelf life is much longer.

One last thing to remember: popping a couple of fish oil and krill oil caps don’t give the same immediate relief as popping a NSAID [Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs like Advil, ibuprofen, Aleve, etc.].

It takes a while–a couple of weeks in my case–for the fish oil/krill oil to provide the same degree of pain relief as the NSAID. The take home message is: don’t take your first dose and compare it to the relief you got with a dose of NSAID. In the study I mentioned in the last post, the subjects took the fish oil for two weeks along with their NSAIDs, then tapered off the drugs and treated their pain with the fish oil alone.

[Two of several clinical studies on Krill Oil (NKO) from PubMed can be found below the author bio.]

###

About the author of this post:

Dr. Michael Eades is one of the foremost bariatric (obesity treatment) doctors in the US and the first to introduce insulin resistance to the mainstream. He is author of the international bestseller, Protein Power.

Clinical Studies:

“Omega-3 DHA and EPA for cognition, behavior, and mood: clinical findings and structural-functional synergies with cell membrane phospholipids.”

Kidd PM.

University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.

The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are orthomolecular, conditionally essential nutrients that enhance quality of life and lower the risk of premature death. They function exclusively via cell membranes, in which they are anchored by phospholipid molecules. DHA is proven essential to pre- and postnatal brain development, whereas EPA seems more influential on behavior and mood. Both DHA and EPA generate neuroprotective metabolites. In double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, DHA and EPA combinations have been shown to benefit attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), autism, dyspraxia, dyslexia, and aggression. For the affective disorders, meta-analyses confirm benefits in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder, with promising results in schizophrenia and initial benefit for borderline personality disorder. Accelerated cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) correlate with lowered tissue levels of DHA/EPA, and supplementation has improved cognitive function. Huntington disease has responded to EPA. Omega-3 phospholipid supplements that combine DHA/EPA and phospholipids into the same molecule have shown marked promise in early clinical trials. Phosphatidylserine with DHA/EPA attached (Omega-3 PS) has been shown to alleviate AD/HD symptoms. Krill omega-3 phospholipids, containing mostly phosphatidylcholine (PC) with DHA/EPA attached, markedly outperformed conventional fish oil DHA/EPA triglycerides in double-blind trials for premenstrual syndrome/dysmenorrhea and for normalizing blood lipid profiles. Krill omega-3 phospholipids demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, lowering C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in a double-blind trial. Utilizing DHA and EPA together with phospholipids and membrane antioxidants to achieve a triple cell membrane synergy may further diversify their currently wide range of clinical applications.

###

“Evaluation of the effect of Neptune Krill Oil on chronic inflammation and arthritic symptoms.”

Deutsch L.

OBJECTIVES: a) To evaluate the effect of Neptune Krill Oil (NKO) on C-reactive protein (CRP) on patients with chronic inflammation and b) to evaluate the effectiveness of NKO on arthritic symptoms. METHODS: Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study. Ninety patients were recruited with confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and/or rheumatoid arthritis and/or osteoarthritis and with increased levels of CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) upon three consecutive weekly blood analysis. Group A received NKO (300 mg daily) and Group B received a placebo. CRP and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis score were measured at baseline and days 7, 14 and 30. RESULTS: After 7 days of treatment NKO reduced CRP by 19.3% compared to an increase by 15.7% observed in the placebo group (p = 0.049). After 14 and 30 days of treatment NKO further decreased CRP by 29.7% and 30.9% respectively (p < 0.001). The CRP levels of the placebo group increased to 32.1% after 14 days and then decreased to 25.1% at day 30. The between group difference was statistically significant; p = 0.004 at day 14 and p = 0.008 at day 30. NKO showed a significant reduction in all three WOMAC scores. After 7 days of treatment, NKO reduced pain scores by 28.9% (p = 0.050), reduced stiffness by 20.3% (p = 0.001) and reduced functional impairment by 22.8% (p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: The results of the present study clearly indicate that NKO at a daily dose of 300 mg significantly inhibits inflammation and reduces arthritic symptoms within a short treatment period of 7 and 14 days.

Posted on: July 23, 2008.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Comment Rules: Remember what Fonzie was like? Cool. That’s how we’re gonna be — cool. Critical is fine, but if you’re rude, we’ll delete your stuff. Please do not put your URL in the comment text and please use your PERSONAL name or initials and not your business name, as the latter comes off like spam. Have fun and thanks for adding to the conversation! (Thanks to Brian Oberkirch for the inspiration)

166 comments on “Krill Oil 48x Better Than Fish Oil?

  1. I have been introduced to krill oil through the well known Dr. Joseph Mercola. It is indeed a very interesting product and that I will definitely try soon.

    One thing that is worth mentioning, krill oil is not only a good product but also a source that is a lot easier to replenish compared to fish oil, which is in high demand due to its high consumption.

    Like

    • Dr. Mercola’s Krill is pretty good but he just doesn’t seem to be trying as hard to offer value as other places.

      His Krill Oil only has 90 MG of EPA and 50MG of DHA with very little astaxanthin. Others have WAY more!

      Like

  2. I’ve recommended Krill oil to two friends, both of which had high cholesterol that drugs were not able to get down. Both of them were able to both lower their cholesterol and get off of the drugs. They had tried all sorts of natural methods previously, including fish oils. (Not that I’m that much into the cholesterol theory of heart disease, but they were.)

    I’ve also seen it work for prostate issues…okay, my prostate issues. As long as I take it I’m perfectly fine. If I stop, it’s multiple bathroom trips at night.

    Anecdote is not proof, but these experiences mirror those described by many others. I think it’s great stuff, and I recommend it to everyone.

    Like

  3. Tim,
    Please link to any study that compares krill oil to NSAIDS. Specifically any study published by a major medical journal. Beyond that I can’t just believe krill oil works.

    ###

    Hi Roger,

    I’ve pasted two clinical studies from PubMed (one from UC Berkeley) in the comments below and will put them at the end of the post as well.

    Best,

    Tim

    Like

  4. Molecularly distilled (i.e. contaminant-free) fish oil is a big deal among some types, especially those who are scared of lead or mercury poisoning in seafood. Is similar contamination a concern with krill oil?

    Like

  5. Hi All,

    Thanks for the great comments and questions. A few things, including clinicals and research:

    1. I use krill oil (about 1,000mg/day post-exercise) and also consume copious amounts of extra light olive oil, but…

    2. Please remember that this article is by Dr. Eades, not me. I’ll likely post a follow-up from Dr. Eades with additional clinical information. In the meantime, here are several abstracts from PubMed (there are more):

    “Omega-3 DHA and EPA for cognition, behavior, and mood: clinical findings and structural-functional synergies with cell membrane phospholipids.”

    Kidd PM.

    University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.

    The omega-3 fatty acids docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are orthomolecular, conditionally essential nutrients that enhance quality of life and lower the risk of premature death. They function exclusively via cell membranes, in which they are anchored by phospholipid molecules. DHA is proven essential to pre- and postnatal brain development, whereas EPA seems more influential on behavior and mood. Both DHA and EPA generate neuroprotective metabolites. In double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, DHA and EPA combinations have been shown to benefit attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), autism, dyspraxia, dyslexia, and aggression. For the affective disorders, meta-analyses confirm benefits in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder, with promising results in schizophrenia and initial benefit for borderline personality disorder. Accelerated cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) correlate with lowered tissue levels of DHA/EPA, and supplementation has improved cognitive function. Huntington disease has responded to EPA. Omega-3 phospholipid supplements that combine DHA/EPA and phospholipids into the same molecule have shown marked promise in early clinical trials. Phosphatidylserine with DHA/EPA attached (Omega-3 PS) has been shown to alleviate AD/HD symptoms. Krill omega-3 phospholipids, containing mostly phosphatidylcholine (PC) with DHA/EPA attached, markedly outperformed conventional fish oil DHA/EPA triglycerides in double-blind trials for premenstrual syndrome/dysmenorrhea and for normalizing blood lipid profiles. Krill omega-3 phospholipids demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, lowering C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in a double-blind trial. Utilizing DHA and EPA together with phospholipids and membrane antioxidants to achieve a triple cell membrane synergy may further diversify their currently wide range of clinical applications.

    ###

    “Evaluation of the effect of Neptune Krill Oil on chronic inflammation and arthritic symptoms.”

    Deutsch L.

    OBJECTIVES: a) To evaluate the effect of Neptune Krill Oil (NKO) on C-reactive protein (CRP) on patients with chronic inflammation and b) to evaluate the effectiveness of NKO on arthritic symptoms. METHODS: Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study. Ninety patients were recruited with confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and/or rheumatoid arthritis and/or osteoarthritis and with increased levels of CRP (>1.0 mg/dl) upon three consecutive weekly blood analysis. Group A received NKO (300 mg daily) and Group B received a placebo. CRP and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis score were measured at baseline and days 7, 14 and 30. RESULTS: After 7 days of treatment NKO reduced CRP by 19.3% compared to an increase by 15.7% observed in the placebo group (p = 0.049). After 14 and 30 days of treatment NKO further decreased CRP by 29.7% and 30.9% respectively (p < 0.001). The CRP levels of the placebo group increased to 32.1% after 14 days and then decreased to 25.1% at day 30. The between group difference was statistically significant; p = 0.004 at day 14 and p = 0.008 at day 30. NKO showed a significant reduction in all three WOMAC scores. After 7 days of treatment, NKO reduced pain scores by 28.9% (p = 0.050), reduced stiffness by 20.3% (p = 0.001) and reduced functional impairment by 22.8% (p = 0.008). CONCLUSION: The results of the present study clearly indicate that NKO at a daily dose of 300 mg significantly inhibits inflammation and reduces arthritic symptoms within a short treatment period of 7 and 14 days.

    Hope that helps, and keep up the conversation :)

    Tim

    Like

  6. Interesting article. I’ve messed with Omega 3′s before with some success. Do you know if Krill Oil gives any benefits to weight lifters?

    Like

  7. Hi Tim,
    According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest (basically, the Consumer Report equivalent of Nutrition), which puts out the Nutrition Action News Healthletter, too much vitamin A can increase risk for hip fractures, liver abnormalities, and birth defects (beta carotene, which the body converts to vitamin A, doesn’t cause those problems. Very high doses can increase risk for lung cancer in smokers. They advocate not getting more than 4,00 IU of retinol (or 5,000 IU beta carotene, vitamin A) from supplements. More than 400 IU of vitamin E a day may slightly increase one’s risk of dying. It would be nice if any of the Krill sellers (all very sketchy websites) would tell us how much vitamin A/E is in each pill.

    CSPI net are located at: http://www.cspinet.org/
    They are the folks who nailed Sara Lee for calling their whole grain bread whole grain – when it is only 30% so. And they are nailing the trans fat people, too.

    Lastly, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) proposed rule that would have protected krill, the organisms that form the foundation of the marine food web, was rejected (… perhaps a result of the pharmaceutical companies’ lobbyists….) Maybe we should think about our environment, before we all start taking a supplement without any large scale clinical trials (that aren’t funded by drug companies…) that might damage it.

    Tim, I am surprised that you endorsed this supplement at this stage in its development. I am also surprised that none of the websites detailing it actually show the IU levels of vitamins that it contains (E, A, D, etc.) Tim, it is important to look at who is funding the studies that you are citing. If the drug companies are funding them, there is a problem there… no?

    I was recently on ABC’s show, 20/20 talking about vitamins and supplements. If you are interested in what I learned during the experience, feel free to contact me.

    A.M.

    Like

    • The biomass of krill is about 500 million tons. Of that we harvest about 110 thousand tons a year. What is that about .002%? I don’t think it is a problem at the moment.

      Like

  8. Thanks for the advice Doc and also Tim for spreading the message. I have been taking fish oil for a few years now with pretty good results and have only in the last month or so seen krill oil enter the market here in Australia. After reading I think I will make the switch once this bottle is empty.

    After years using NSAID’s in my teens (as well as SAID’s) I now find little, if any, benefit from them in my early twenty’s.

    Like

  9. Hey Tim, really interesting post.

    I’m not sure how much to buy into it though. Part of my doubt is attributable to the massive hype surrounding Omega 3 and its capacity to mitigate ADHD. I didn’t follow it in actual medical journals, but I know that a great deal of the hype surrounding it was propagated after a study showing improvements in the mental performance of a group of British children. But as I understand it, it was an uncontrolled study and the children were taking Omega 3 while adopting a variety of other major dietary changes.

    Trying to take these nutrients are, for students such as myself, serious financial investments, and I can’t afford to buy into speculation. Many nutrients such as these come with the “non-FDA approved” disclaimers. How does one discern between the legitimate and illegitimate claims without trying to grapple with esoteric medical / nutritional journalism? At least in the case of Omega 3 and krill oil?

    Thanks in advance if you end up answering this,

    Zeeshan A

    Like

  10. I’d be interested in hearing from Mr. Ferriss what, if any, fish oil supplement he takes.

    This is a cool article, very exciting and worth looking into. I usually stick to the basics in my supplementation: protein, creatine and fish oil. If this stuff gets more bang for the buck so to speak, then it would be a welcome replacement.

    Does one take Krill in addition to fish oil? Or replace fish oil all together?

    -CD

    Like

  11. Great Post,

    I very much enjoyed an informative and brief article. Is there a specific brand by which you recommend?

    Best to you,

    Jose Castro-Frenzel

    P.S. I will be in Nicaragua on the 19th-29th of Aug 08, so I have not forgotten about posting the youtube URL. I am going to be doing some volcano surfing, pics and videos to arrive soon enough. Oh and btw check out Corn Island : )………. the small one( there are 2)

    Like

  12. Yo Tim,

    Thanks for the informative post. My dad is diabetic AND arthritic. I’ll pass this along to him.

    Also, a quick google search yielded this link about how the over-fishing of Krill is endangering the ocean’s ecosystem: http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/05/25/business/krill.php

    Curious to know your thoughts?

    Please don’t take this as an underhanded RainbowGathering Greenpeace attempt at a message… (not that there’d be anything wrong with that ;-)). I really dig your work and would love to hear your opinions and thoughts about how to reconcile our (human’s) desire for krill oil versus the Ocean’s depletion of these wee shrimpies.

    The force is strong in dees gwan,
    D

    ###

    Hi David,

    I read the Herald Tribune article, which is excellent. I would note, however, that the threat they rightly identify is a future threat based on potential abuse of new harvest technologies, combined with climate change that decreases the krill population. The “Overfishing of Krill Threatens Ocean Ecosystem” headline should really have a “Potential” in front of it. Here’s one portion of their introduction or lede:

    “So far, difficulties in processing krill on ships, high fuel prices and the expense of sending fleets to the bottom of the globe has kept a lid on annual catches, which remain far below levels set under a treaty governing Antarctic marine life.”

    I suspect that two things will keep future yields below the same levels: 1) rising gasoline prices (costs of sending fleets is increasing, not decreasing), and 2) food security legislation, particularly with an organism low on the food chain.

    Hope that helps!

    Tim

    Like

  13. I take a tablespoon of high quality Norwegian fish oil (CarlsenLabs.com) each day along with Black Strap Molasses and Flax Seed Oil. Molasses? yup the Uridine is great for many things including mood.
    Regarding fish oil and Omega-3, there is a great book out called, “The Queen of Fats” and there are many studies on the benefits.
    Krill is something new to me but makes sense and I look forward to looking into it further.

    Like

  14. An interesting article! Do you have some references for the studies you mentioned? I’d like to read more background on it.

    Like

  15. Great article …. It’s interesting seeing that as the oceans warm and the krill populations are suffering that we should now decided to harvest them to make up for our lazy eating habits and over indulgent diets.

    But I guess we could schmooze up to the Japanese and lobby the Whaling Commission to allow Japan and their harpoon hungry friends to start up whaling again and wipe out the majority of the whales that selfishly devour our krill .

    That would essentially leave more of the damn little critters so the lard asses of the world can fix their diet induced diseases without the fishy after taste.

    Like

  16. DR. EADES, Thanks you!! I have read many of your books and learned a lot from them. One question I have is this: Are all the re-branded products the same? I see Krill oil (NKO) from so many different brands including Now, Jarrow, Source Naturals. Which brand do you find to have the most regular dosage and quality? Thanks for all you do!

    Like

    • Thats nature, eat or be eaten. Animal cruelty is a different issue altogether but human health is more important than the feelings of bugs who live in the ocean

      Like

  17. Great Post Tim,

    Being a professional trainer, fitness psychologists, I have been eating very clean and healthy for 20 years. At 43 years old i am in the best condition of my life and am very in tune with my body. When I try something new, it is very easy for me to see the benefits of lack of.

    After personally talking to Dr. Mercola, he convinced me to try krill. I can tell you that I have seen all the benefits in your post and then some. I have been on it exclusively for a year now.

    It is an incredible nutrient without the risk of metal toxicity because of the “Krill” being so little and at the very bottom of the food chain in the ocean. You and your faithful followers will be well on your way to “Reaching Your True Fitness / Fat loss potential by using this product.

    Dr. Mercola and I are going to be doing some experiments with combining the intense athletic lifestyle with the holistic / organic lifestyle. I will keep you updated of our findings. I believe that we can all live long and strong (God willing) to 150 years of age. When I asked Dr. Mercola how long he would live to, he looked me square in the eye and said, “150″. And he meant it.

    I believe that by keeping things simple, but making informed decisions about the Foods That We Eat, The Exercise That We Get, & The Thoughts That We Think we all can change our body, our lifestyle, and our life. Our bodies our incredible, and we all have the ability to grow new healthy cells and become completely healthy in as little as 12 weeks (84 days).

    Tim, I commend your work. You are a very intelligent dude. Thanks for all the great fitness info. And my offer still stands, next time you are in Chicago, please look me up so we can put our heads together.

    P.S. one more note on healthy fat. After talking with Dr. Udo Urasmus I have also started taking “UDO’S OIL”. I believe that this is the other healthy fat that anyone and everyone could highly benefit from.

    Keep it up Tim, Live Long, Live Strong my Fitness Friend!!

    Like

  18. I would be interested to hear about doses and brands for kids under 7. Also, the vegetarian recipe that I learned which addressed Omegas in the most absorbable form was: equal parts 1) flax seed; 2) sesame seed; 3) pumpkin seed; 4) sunflower seed; all soaked in quality water for 8 hours to stimulate a beginning process of sprouting, rinsed and Vita-Mixed in quality water for a pure white tasteless shake. Twice a day.

    Hemp seed oil, if you look at the charts at the natural foods stores, promotes itself as a higher balance of all the omegas in the way the body likes to absorb it (over fish oils, didn’t see krill on the list though). I’m a flexa-pescatarian so I’m open to krill, but I would like to hear discussion on the different oils (including olive). I’ll take them all and give them to my wife and kids if it works, and over weeks and years too. It’s worth it to guard against not only the NDAIDs but other meds threatening children and adults.

    Like

  19. @David Gonzalez

    I read the Herald Tribune article, which is excellent. I would note, however, that the threat they rightly identify is a future threat based on potential abuse of new harvest technologies, combined with climate change that decreases the krill population. The “Overfishing of Krill Threatens Ocean Ecosystem” headline should really have a “Potential” in front of it. Here’s one portion of their introduction or lede:

    “So far, difficulties in processing krill on ships, high fuel prices and the expense of sending fleets to the bottom of the globe has kept a lid on annual catches, which remain far below levels set under a treaty governing Antarctic marine life.”

    I suspect that two things will keep future yields below the same levels: 1) rising gasoline prices (costs of sending fleets is increasing, not decreasing), and 2) food security legislation, particularly with an organism low on the food chain.

    Hope that helps!

    Tim

    Like

  20. I live in Vancouver, Canada and for the last little while this whole topic has got a lot of media buzz, but I can tell you first hand I gave it 2 month trial and documented everything about how i felt, how my stress levels were in response to work demands, etc …..

    Bottom line i do feel much better, have a more focused and longer energy level, as a long time fish oil user I wont go back, Krill is where it is at……
    Just be careful as to where you get the stuff from and do some research on the company you are using as mercury levels can be very high depending on actually source, etc

    best of luck

    Like

  21. I just started taking flax oil capsules. I’m about a month in to the bottle and already noticed 2 interesting effects:
    1) Skin is not dry whatsoever.
    2) Significant decrease in stiff joints post running

    I’m now wondering if they are on par with fish &/or krill oils, or in a class of their own. Time to investigate!

    Like

  22. “Krill are heavily fished commercially. The krill fishery has been the largest fishery in the Southern Ocean for the last 25 years, particularly in Ukraine, Poland and Japan. Because krill are at the center of the Antarctic food web, these countries have signed an agreement limiting the size of krill catches to hopefully keep a large enough population for the larger animals that feed on them such as baleen whales, penguins and seals.”

    Question: How have we managed to survive without Krill oil? Do we really need to rob marine life of their food supply when there are healthy alternatives? No!

    Like

  23. Interesting choice of headline. It’s a bit sensationalist to suggest that krill is “48x” as potent as fish oil. The line you derive that headline from simply suggests that the natural ORAC (antioxidant) capacity of krill is 48x higher than that of fish oil. But no one in their right mind takes either for its antioxidant capacity. For example, when you look at ORAC, the amount of krill Tim takes offers less than 5% of what might be considered the “DV” (or RDA) of antioxidants. We get orders of magnitude more antioxidants from fruits and vegetables (or other supplements). We take krill or fish oil supplements because they are great sources of DHA and EPA. And it that regard, they are virtually identical (subjective reports of diminished PMS symptoms in one study notwithstanding). Furthermore, most fish oil refiners add vitamin E to the oil as an antioxidant to give stability and add shelf-life, so the comparative shelf lives are also similar. I really don’t see one as being “better” than the other…intead, I see two alternative choices, either of which might represent the single best supplement choice you could make if you were only to take one supplement.

    Like

  24. Hi Tim,

    Krill oil looks like it has some killer antioxidant properties! But some suspect that introducing antioxidants can prevent your body’s repair mechanisms from acting optimally. What’s your take?

    Supposedly, when the body senses oxidative stress, it begins the process of repairing cells as well as growing new muscle. Antioxidant supplementation attenuates this response by mopping up the free radicals, causing the body to perceive less damage than there really is.

    Here’s some related research links found at the ever-truthy Wikipedia -

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=923220

    http://rparticle.web-p.cisti.nrc.ca/rparticle/AbstractTemplateServlet?journal=cjpp&volume=76&year=&issue=&msno=y98-047&calyLang=eng

    Nico

    Like

  25. Tim,

    Thanks for posting this article by Dr. Eades. It’s worth noting that you should read the label on the krill oil you buy to check the EPA/DHA content. While Neptune may produce “virtually all” of the krill oil sold to supplement companies, they are not the only producer.

    Another company, Cyvex (http://www.cyvex.com) produces a krill oil they call KriaXanthin. Based on the nutrition labels of the various products, it appears that Neptune Krill Oil has more than three times as much EPA/DHA (240mg per 1g) as KriaXanthin (only 70mg per 1g). (Both products seem to have the same amount of astaxanthin; 1.5mg).

    I don’t know if this huge difference is due to Neptune’s patented process or not, but I would be inclined to avoid the KriaXanthin in favor of NKO if these numbers are accurate. Caveat emptor, in any case.

    As an aside, I take 3g EPA/DHA daily, in the form of pharmaceutical grade fish oil, for it’s anti-inflammatory benefits. Without it, I experience mild chronic joint pains. With it, I am pain free. I’ve have yet to see another supplement with such dramatic results, and I will definitely be looking into the krill oil. Thanks again for posting Dr. Eades article!

    Like

  26. Gabby–

    “Question: How have we managed to survive without Krill oil? Do we really need to rob marine life of their food supply when there are healthy alternatives? No!”

    What are the healthy alternatives?

    Like

  27. Hey,
    I love all the stuff you have going on your blog. About this one though, I do wonder about raping another of earth’s amazing resources. Let’s all remember, krill is one of the elements at the bottom of the food chain for all life in the sea…are we going to wipe it out too. I know, 500 million tons but with 6 billion people in the world…500 million gets smaller very quickly…just a thought

    Like

  28. Interesting article.

    On the need for omega-3′s: Humans used to eat a lot of omega-3′s from fish and naturally fed livestock and game (not to mention grains and nuts). Over the course of our evolution our biology has had these substances. The Industrial Revolution (and a significant change in human diet) is relatively new compared to evolutionary time scales. It makes sense that supplementing our diets with these lipids either from natural sources or high quality supplements to levels that were common for our pre-modern ancestors might have health benefits. I don’t buy that these are miracle cures, though. The one solid use for fish bourne omega-3′s are triglyceride lowering medicines. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16832161?dopt=Abstract — although the exact method in which n-3 omega 3′s reduce triglycerides is not fully understood)

    Concerning flax seed oil and other ‘short chain’ omega-3′s: There is evidence that the vegetal based omega-3′s are less beneficial to you than the animal-derived long chain lipids.

    See this presentation. Other documents on this site are very interesting:

    http://www.lipidsonline.org/slides/talk_cme_activity.cfm?CME_activityid=126&talk_pk=42&tk=42&shownotes=1

    Like

  29. Oh btw, just an FYI to everyone out there. You can get the internet price of the Vitamin Shoppee if you just ask for it in the store. They will honor it, just ask for it. This will save you anywhere from 15%-50% off the marked prices in stores.

    Jose

    Like

  30. Hey Tim,

    I was on the Arnold recommended 6g of fish oil a day. Do you think this is exsessive? I was wondering how many mg of Krill Oil you take a day?

    -Matt

    Like

  31. I had read about krill oil on Dr. Mercola’s site, but I am still concerned about how we humans are screwing with the food chain (among other things) which we (ironically of course) need to survive. I appreciate this discussion.

    “The world does not exist solely for the betterment and multiplication of mankind.” — one of my favorite quotes :)

    I will be watching this one closely, before I decide to buy. Even as my husband and I are having issues with many of the exact symptoms described that this elixer should correct.

    I think we can be more okay by reducing stress #1 – and eating more fresh, local food to include ***healthy fats***!

    To be continued :) Excellent discussion.

    Like

  32. From a holistic perspective, it would seem that a krill supplement would be much more healthy than taking fish oil. If I’m correct, fish oil is derived from the fishes liver and that would also contain toxins that the fish absorbed during the end of its life. That’s not something you want in your body… Correct me if i’m wrong, but krill seems like a better alternative based on that alone.

    Like

  33. So what is this really, a commercial for krill oil? I don’t see how this is remotely relevant to the ostensible purpose of this blog. So Tim, how much are you making out of this then?

    The fact no-one else is seeing this for the transparent sales pitch it is dismays me to an astonishing degree.

    ###

    Hi Tetsuo,

    If you look at the “4-hour body” and “physical performance” categories, you’ll see that nutrition has been a part of this blog for some time. I can see how one might misread the blog post, but two things:

    1. This was written by Dr. Michael Eades.

    2. I don’t write blog posts for money. If I wanted more income, there are much more effective paths for me to take, including speaking, writing, investing, and consulting for companies.

    Hope that helps!

    Tim

    Like

  34. “The anti-oxidant potency of krill oil is such that when compared to fish oil in terms of ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorptance Capacity) values, it was found to be 48 times more potent than fish oil.”

    How was this measured? In-vitro? In vivo? An in-vitro assay can be promising, but it doesn’t mean that it will be as effective when tested in an animal model or even in a human as single cells are far less complex than organisms.

    Like

  35. On the flip side….

    It’s worth nothing that the body has endogenous and very tissue specific (read: effective) anti oxidant systems it uses and that consuming larger doses of *some* anti ox. compounds has been demonstrated to have a net PRO oxidative effect.

    ….especially after training…..

    Just thought you may want to know. Remember balance in reporting these things is always key.

    Like

  36. To: Tim Ferriss *NSCS Challenge Completed!* Tim, I didn’t see a way to email you directly so I hope you respond to this…I was at the NSCS convention in Florida, perhaps you remember me… I asked you about Lance Armstrong and for advice after your speech… Anyways I wanted to let you know that I was able to talk to an “untouchable” and ask two questions for your challenge because TONY DUNGY, the Colts football coach, was doing a book signing at the Mall of America! I can send you pictures of the book and the event photos to prove it. Just let me know what I need to do. Lance

    Like

  37. I took a bottle of Dr. Mercola’s krill oil. The negative is that the capsules are fat and hurt me to swallow (maybe I have thin plumbing?). Anyway I solved that by grinding up the capsules in my blender with a shake. This does NOT give it a fishy taste, which does happen if you put unflavored cod liver oil in a shake.

    What results did I get from taking the krill? Now I feel more… krilly.

    Like

  38. @Tetsuo
    If you read Tim’s posts from before, you’ll notice that he touches on nutrition topics periodically, which I find very interesting and enriching.

    I have had only limited amount of info about krill oil before, I was glad to look closer into this alternative.

    Like

  39. Krill are a major source of food for every other sea creature that eats them, including whales and fish.

    I would hate to see human harvesting of the bottom of the food chain,
    and its resulting total destruction of whole ecosystems.

    Krill hunting = very bad idea.

    Controlled Krill Farming, possibly a very good idea…

    Like

  40. Great post. I have had joint problems for a little while and have been experimenting with Omega-3. I need to keep up with it though and do a better job.

    I had never heard of krill oil before but it makes complete sense. If it can feed a whale then I am sure that it has some good health benefits.

    Like

  41. Having had a mild allergy to shellfish all of life I simply don’t eat seafood. Can’t stand the smell or taste either. I tried krill oil from Costco and sure enough, in a week,I developed itching and bumps on my arms and legs.
    So I am leaving the krill for the whales and returning to flax and fish oil-scales
    not shelled variety. When I cut the krill the allergic reaction went away.

    Krilling Me Softly

    Like

  42. Tim, ***Authors***, and all others,

    I’m afraid that my previous one-line questions are getting lost in heated discussions of Amish culture, krill oil benefits, and uses of JIT systems.

    So let me start by saying, technically, this should be considered OFF TOPIC.

    I’ve realized that I have esoteric knowledge in a specialized area that is not related to my existing business. There is a thirsty crowd that is seeking what my grey matter is holding.

    Solution? Book.

    (This was a lightbulb moment experienced while reading Tim’s book. So, thank you Tim!)

    I know what you are thinking, and the answer is, no, it is not going to be titled:

    THE 3-HOUR WORKWEEK
    Escape the Four Hour Workweek, Live Everywhere, and Compete with Tim Ferriss in Dance Competitions across the Globe

    My big question for authors:

    What are the benefits and drawbacks to offering a book as an ebook, or as an ebook only?

    The little questions:

    Is there any way to protect an ebook from being distributed all over kingdom come once purchased by one user?
    What are the benefits/drawbacks to getting or not getting an ISBN?
    What are the benefits/drawbacks to using a full-service publisher? On-demand publisher?
    How would you recommend new authors select the price for their book(s)? Are there any other resources that you would suggest for such an endeavor?

    Thank you for your help, kind bloggers.

    ~Sunday

    PS: Tim, have you read The Birth Order Book by Kevin Leman? You strike me as a first-born, or at least a “functional” first born. Would you share your birth order to settle my curiosity?

    Like

  43. Hi Tim -

    You may or may not know this about the different types of olive oils. It is a widely held belief that extra virgin olive oil is by far the healthiest.

    Extra virgin – considered the best, least processed, comprising the oil from the first pressing of the olives.
    Virgin – from the second pressing.
    Pure – undergoes some processing, such as filtering and refining.
    Extra light – undergoes considerable processing and only retains a very mild olive flavour.

    Like

  44. Sunday: With such open-ended questions, perhaps you should hire a business consultant rather than seek free advice on the net for what sounds like a report.

    It’s kind of hilarious at times what people ask strangers to do for them, as if we owe it to them.

    Like

  45. @akthe47

    Interesting. I often give free advice or provide resources to those who come to me seeking knowledge in my area of expertise. Are you suggesting that I should tell them to take a hike instead because it is also my business and livelihood?

    I’ve noticed that, when given the opportunity to help someone learn and grow, people will indeed share resources. Without compensation. Imagine that.

    Thank you for your contribution to this forum.

    ~Sunday

    Like

  46. Tim, given that your information is on the edge of popular culture, I was wondering if you would look into Helminthic Therapy. Maybe have a piece called “Cure all your allergies, asthma and arthritis in just 4 hours”.

    Like

    • Instead of consuming krill at the start of the food chain why not do as the Japanese do and eat whale meat at the end of the chain ( concentrated krill oil, if you like ) . Some say it taste like beef .

      Like

  47. Well, i’ve been on Tim’s lose 20 lbs in 30 days diet for about a month now, and it has definitely been working. Not quite at the that rate, but I think its because I’m a much smaller guy and I take my free days a little TOO seriously, haha. Regardless, the results have been immense and I’m very happy.

    My current body composition is 11% @ 149 lbs (I’m 5’6″). My goal is to reach 7% to FINALLY get that 6 pack I’ve been wanting for years. Fat loss is KEY.

    MY QUESTION-

    About a month ago, I bought a bottle of cold pressed flax seed oil for the omega3 benefits. Since then I have only taken it once. My main concern is that the fat will not be metabolized and will get stored as additional flubber (fat), which I’m trying to eliminate. I know everyone raves about these healthy supplemental oils, but are they really compatible/beneficial to fat loss goals? Also, as Tim’s diet suggests, I do get some healthy fats from walnuts, almonds, some olive oil, grilled salmon and other fish, etc. Is there a threshold at which my “healthy fat” consumption is too high and will begin getting stored in fat cells? This is my biggest concern.

    Thanks in advance to anyone that responds.

    Like

  48. I have just blogged about the use of these oils and your different options for supplements and foods for correcting omega 3:6 ratios. Just lick my name over there on the left….

    As for

    “I’ll stick to olive for the time being :)”

    Nestor, keep in mind this is a little like saying….

    ‘forget the trumpet, I’ll stick to a bicycle for the time being :)

    They may be made out of broadly similar materials but they have quite different functions.

    PUFA supplements are aimed at shifting your omega 3 to 6 balance. Olive oil, with a balance of > than 1:8 (omega 3:6) if will do nothing positive for this ratio. Oilve oil is something to include in a good varied diet though!

    Like

  49. Hey Tim,

    Thanks for another great post on nutrition.

    You’ve touched on mobile training in one or two of your posts, I was wondering if you’d do a whole blog post on how you keep in shape while on the road.

    Thanks!

    Like

  50. Interesting post!

    I went over to my local vitamin store to grab some krill oil and had a hard time finding it. What is interesting is that it is not in the same section as all the other similar Oil’s (flax, grape, fish).

    I found it on the bottom shelf in the section for joint and womens health. It has been marketed mainly to women looking for PMS relief and older people with arthritis. Looks like the makers of fish oil are trying to keep this away from their products? The people that worked there didn’t even know what i was talking about until we looked it up online and they saw what the bottle looked like. It is definatly not one of those FAD pills at the moment.

    Tim – Is this something that has replaced your flaxseed oil or supplemented your flaxseed intake?

    Like

  51. Just waiting for the first post advocating snake oil as being 48x more powerful than krill oil?

    We need a really good study on the effects of omega-3 on the general population – there’s still no wide medical acceptance that omega-3 supplements have health benefits.

    Like

  52. Hi Tim,

    I’ve heard and read the same great things about krill oil. It’s been described to me as being “like fish oil on steroids.” BUT, according to Charles Poliquin anyway, all the current sources and suppliers of krill oil for some reason are presently sub-standard — I’m not sure why that is, but something about the global supply of it basically being shite right now. (Hopefully just temporarily). I’ll have to look into it more; you might want to do the same.

    Like

  53. I love krill oil. In fact, I have found it to be such a benefit I have joined a company that promotes health through ingredients from the ocean. You can check it out by clicking on my name. This is a great place to pick up some krill oil and support a company that believes in giving back to the environment in a big way.

    Like

  54. Interesting post. However, I’d have appreciated a larger disclaimer saying it wasn’t by Tim! I’ve been reading the blog for a while, and have appreciated Tim’s various articles on nutrition. I don’t read Dr Eades, and don’t know his background. Particularly given he has a financial interest in the sales of Krill oil (although I accept that may well be because he thinks it’s a good product), I’d have felt this article to be more useful if it had included a prominent mention of the alternate author.

    Like

  55. Based on this advice, I ordered some.
    I *hate* seafood. Taste, smell, texture, etc., the smell in a store will make me ill.

    I have tried various kinds of fish oil capsules and always taste it in burps. I have been diagnosed with Acid Reflux (GIRD) stage 3, which is about as bad as it gets.

    I took my first two krill oil capsules today.

    I have burped dozens of times since (as usual), but I have had no fish taste. Nothing unpleasant.

    If the other benefits are as good as this non-effect, I’ll be a very happy man.

    Like

  56. As an FYI in response to A.M’s post on July 23rd regarding the lack of seller’s disclosure of the amounts of vitamin A and other ingredients in their krill oil capsules…

    Dr. Mercola lists all the ingredients in the ANTARCTIC PURE KRILL OIL he sells.

    2 Softgels contain:

    1,000 mg genuine neptune Krill Oil
    100 IU vitamin A
    400 mg omega-3 rich phospholipids
    150 mg EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid)
    90 mg DHA (docosahexaenoic acid)
    20 mg omega-6 fatty acids
    1.5 mg astaxanthin

    Sincerely,
    Ami

    Like

  57. Phillip, where does Tim mention mobile training? I second your request, a post on diet and exercise while travelling would be excellent.

    thanks

    Hue

    Like

  58. Someone mentioned the idea of controlled farming of Krill.
    However, this approach hasn’t been particularly successful other types of fish and sea creatures.

    Have a look at this article in the Washington Post:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A8743-2004Jun26.html

    “They note that out of the 215 stocks the government tracks, one-third, or 76, are being fished faster than they can reproduce.”

    So it seems to me that the issue of overfarming Krill is a real concern, giving the human track record on this planet with other marine creatures that we eat and overdeplete.

    Like

  59. Does anyone knows how this krill oil is produced? I checked Neptune’s patents and it appears they are using solvent extraction. Now it is not to interesting to ingest something extracted by chemical solvents. Any comments?

    Like

  60. @Jeremy/Alex:

    Gleaned from Dr. Douglas Graham’s collection of articles at FoodnSport.com:

    -=-Because they are refined from their original state, oils are no longer safe to ingest into the body. In their concentrated forms, they are pure fat and large amounts of that fat will be directly absorbed into the bloodstream, adversely affecting the blood viscosity (thickness) and the blood chemistry. However, eating some fresh olives, coconut flesh, or sunflower seeds, in moderation, is not bad for you. These whole foods assuredly contain plenty of fat but it is in a form that is combined with all the essential nutrients designed by nature to accompany that fat.-=-

    In his book, “The 80/10/10 Diet,” Dr. D recommends a minimum of 80% Carbs, and a maximum of 10% Protein and 10% Fat for daily intake. Thanks for the opportunity to share this with my pal, Tim (long time, not talk — glad to see things are still going swimmingly! ;-) and fellow blog fans!

    Vayan con Dios, Amigos ~ I AM!

    Like

  61. I just thought I’d point out that the first paper listed in this article is in no way “from UC Berkeley”. The guy got his PhD there and was a lecturer there more than 20 years ago.

    Like

  62. Tim, you fitness nuthead.

    I think you are as insanely obsessed with finding this cool stuff as I am , yet I don’t have a book on the bestseller list – yet.

    As always you have done your homework and deserve the rewards for your continuous hard work. Thanks for digging these nuggets out for us lazy A$$es.

    Here is another ‘thumbs up’ from that Dr Weil fella that says Krill oil is better than sex … sorta.

    http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/QAA400239

    Like

  63. Most claim krill is safe as it’s low on the food chain. However, krill, like all other antarctic marine life, are polluted with organochlorine compounds.

    ABSTRACT

    Occurrence of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their enantiomeric signatures, and concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the Adélie penguin food web, Antarctica.
    Corsolini S, Covaci A, Ademollo N, Focardi S, Schepens P.

    Department of Environmental Science G. Sarfatti, University of Siena, via P.A. Mattioli, 4, I-53100 Siena, Italy. corsolini@unisi.it

    Concentrations and enantiomeric signatures of organochlorine pesticides were determined in Antarctic krill, emerald rockcod and Adélie penguin from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. HCB and DDTs were prevalent contaminants in penguin eggs. The highest concentrations of SigmaHCHs (1.35 +/- 0.72 ng/g) were found in the rockcod muscle, where gamma-HCH (1.23 +/- 0.67 ng/g) was the principal isomer. The ratio gamma-HCH/alpha-HCH was evaluated. Enantioselective gas chromatography was used for the evaluation of enantiomeric fractions (EFs) for alpha-HCH and oxychlordane. An increase of 14% in the (+)alpha-HCH enantiomer was found from krill through penguin, suggesting the enantioselective biotransformation increased proportionately with trophic level. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured and their concentrations were 5.6 +/- 1.12, 5.81 +/- 2.32, 4.57 +/- 0.17 and 3.06 +/- 3.27 ng/g lipids in krill, rockcod muscle, rockcod homogenate and penguin eggs, respectively. The detection of BDE28, BDE47, BDE99 and BDE100 in Antarctic organisms confirmed their global transport and distribution; the detection of lower brominated congeners suggested a potential long-range transport.

    Like

  64. Thanks for the info, Hobolicious, but I have some questions;
    (I apologize if this seems rude)
    - Does anyone doubt that trace elements are carried in smaller organisms throughout the food chain? Isn’t that like saying water is wet? (apologies for the snark)
    - Do the numbers you present represent a positive help or potential harm for the consumer? While technical information like this is great, without context it is worse than not having it. I don’t know what Polybrominated diphenyl ethers are, don’t know if they are good or bad, and I’m not going to look them up. (OK, I looked it up in wikipedia. Yep, PBDEs accumulate. Nothing about how that is bad.)
    - And – very importantly – I see a lot of studies that show high cholesterol is bad and can result in an early, painful death via heart attack or stroke. The question for me (the consumer) is whether I am willing to risk potential PBDE accumulation in exchange for lower cholesterol and the other benefits of Krill. Everything has risk. I need to know the relative risk of one versus the other.

    Thanks for the info, but how about some context?

    Like

  65. why fish or krill – why not flaxseed oil? Flaxseed oil beats all of them hands down and as far as I’m aware is not allergenic. Not only this but it’s more environmentally friendly, and doesn’t kill any animals.

    Like

  66. Another oil to consider is “Udos Oil” which was formulated by a man named Udo Erasmus.

    This has been a popular oil used in fasting and various health retreats around the world and is perhaps the best source of Omega 3, 6 and 9 varieties of essential fatty acids.

    Contrary to popular opinion, the fats in EFAs (essential fatty acids) actually help you lose weight!

    The heavy acids and toxins in our bodies (consumed through our environment and particular foods) pack on unsightly belly fat. EFA’s actually help regulate and normalize those acids in our bodies which, in turn, have an amazing fat burning effect (while boosting your energy and overall health).

    Like

  67. Fantastic article!

    In addition to helping to provide long term pain relief, essential fatty acids (like the Omega 3s found in Krill Oil) help your body to:

    1. Strengthen the immune system
    2. Increase energy, performance, and stamina
    3. Lower most risk factors for cardiovascular disease
    4. Improve brain function: mood, intelligence, behavior, and vision
    5. Aid in weight reduction
    6. Speed recovery and healing
    7. Improve digestion
    8. Decrease infection
    9. Produce beautiful skin, hair, and nails
    10. Regulate organs and glands

    In fact, it’s been proven in a scientific study that athletes consuming EFAs on a regular basis have increased their stamina from 40-60%, recovered faster, added muscle more easily and had less pain.

    The benefits are numerous….

    Like

  68. This is not really connected, but i was wondering what your thoughts were on human growth hormone. I am not trying to get huge, or become a giant, I was just wondering if you think that HGH will keep us all healthier, happier and sexier for a lot longer than in days gone by….I have heard about supplements that make you feel better, and they are advertised as HGH, so what does tim ferris think???

    Like

  69. How about phytoplankton?

    Krill eat phytoplankton and phytoplankton contains EPA and DHA apparently also hooked up in a double chain phospholipid structure.

    It’s already being farmed so there’s no need to fear depleting the natural supply.

    Like

  70. Flax seed is NOT the same as fish oil/cod liver oil. The bio-availability ratio of flax vs fish is 20 to 1 (or more). Flax comes from a plant and needs to convert in your body to epa and dha, which is an extremely difficult conversion process since most of us are defficient in a digestive enzyme (d6)…mainly bc of our “western diet”.

    Fish oil is much more effective.

    The few studies written on Krill oil (objectively we should look at pubmed.gov) are useless from the perspective of human nutrition. How many studies do we really have on animals and humans when it comes to Krill oil??

    Like

  71. I was introduced to Krill oil through studying about supplements while working out with my personal trainer. I have found a source of Krill oil that is effective and I also use that company to sustain my lifestyle just as taught in your book. I love it thanks for the information

    Jon

    Like

  72. While the advantages of krill oil are numerous, even potentially better than that of the traditional fish oils, you have to look at the impact and the sustainability of such practices. Working in the health and fitness industry I am very aware of the benefits to be had with omega-3 supplementation and personally take Nordic Naturals Omega-3 fish oil on a daily basis

    However, I am somewhat concerned about the impact it may have on the ecosystem. Considering krill is the food source for Blue whales among many other very large animals the supply of krill is integral to their survival.

    The concept of omega-3 supplementation is strictly to rebalance the ratio of omega-3′s (anti-inflammatory) to omega-6′s (pro-inflammatory). Living off a traditional diet the average individual consumed a ratio of approximately 1:2 to 1:4 omega-3′s to omega-6′s. In recent years that ratio has shifted upwards of 1:20 omega-3′s to omega-6′s. This can be seen in the increased prevalence of degenerative disease.

    The major issue should be to address why we have made such a large shift in the past 20 years or so not continue to try to add more supplements to our list in hopes of overcoming our bad habits. Again I personally take moderate amounts of fish oil on a daily basis and think it is a good general prevention idea. The idea of starting to exploit a food source that humans have never directly consumed at the potential detriment of other species seems somewhat arrogant on our part.

    Sorry for being somewhat long-winded but I think it is important to understand multiple facets of any decision that is made.

    Like

  73. Thanks for the concise advice. I am on my way to grab a bottle now. I hope that it also helps to hydrate my hair, skin and nails! We shall see…
    Tance
    P.S. I am grateful to Tim Ferriss for all the awareness, perspective and brilliance of life he offers to the world. Merci Tim !!

    Like